Franz Joseph Aumann

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Franz Joseph Aumann (also Auman, Aumon; 24 February 1728, Traismauer – 30 March 1797, Sankt Florian) was an Austrian composer. Before his voice broke, he sang in the same Viennese choir as Michael Haydn and Johann Georg Albrechtsberger,[1] composers with whom he later in life traded manuscripts.[2] In view of this circulation, it is not surprising that some of his music has been incorrectly attributed to Haydn. However, his Missa Profana, satirizing the stuttering and bad singing of a schoolmaster, was once attributed to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.[3]

Aumann was ordained a priest in the Augustinian Order in St. Florian in 1757, essentially staying there for the rest of his life. He said Mass occasionally,[citation needed] but wrote lots of mass settings.

Aumann's music was a large part of the repertoire at St. Florian in the 19th century, and Anton Bruckner availed himself of this resource for his studies of counterpoint.[4] Bruckner focused a lot of his attention on Aumann's Christmas responsories and an Ave Maria in D major.[5] Aumann's oeuvre also includes instrumental music, such as some of the earliest string quintets.[6]

Works, editions and recordings[edit]

Recordings
  • Requiem. Ecce quomodo. Tenebrae. Te Deum. Ars Antiqua Austria, Gunar Letzbor. Pan Classics. 2011

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ New Grove, Volume 2[page needed]
  2. ^ p. 94, Hawkshaw Paul (2007). 90 "Anton Bruckner's Counterpoint Studies at the Monastery of Saint Florian, 1845–55", 1 Musical Quarterly
  3. ^ p. 772, Abert, Spencer; Eisen, Hermann; Stewart, Cliff (2007). New Haven, Connecticut, W. A. Mozart, Yale University Press
  4. ^ p. 98 (2007) Hawkshaw
  5. ^ p. 107 (2007) Hawkshaw
  6. ^ p. vii, Eisen Cliff (1998). Madison, Wisconsin, Four Viennese String Quintets, A-R Editions, Inc.