Franz Liszt's treatments of the works of other composers

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The following shows details of the various treatments given by Franz Liszt to the works of almost 100 other composers.

These treatments included transcriptions for other instruments (predominantly solo piano), arrangements, orchestrations, fantaisies, reminiscences, paraphrases, illustrations, variations, editions, etc.

Liszt also extensively treated his own works in similar ways, but these are not shown here. Neither are his treatments of national/folk melodies whose composers are not known, or other anonymous works.

In most cases, Liszt arranged just one or two pieces by a composer, but he went somewhat further with the works of Bach, Beethoven, Berlioz, Donizetti, Mendelssohn, Meyerbeer, Mozart, Rossini, Schubert, Verdi, Wagner and Weber.

The earliest-born composer whose works Liszt dealt with was Orlande de Lassus (born c. 1532). Jacques Arcadelt was born earlier (c. 1507), but Liszt's treatment was not of Arcadelt's original work, rather of a setting by Pierre-Louis Dietsch loosely based on Arcadelt.

The last composer to die whose works Liszt dealt with was Géza Zichy, who died in 1924.

Contents

Kornél Ábrányi[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Tamássy József kedvelt dalai, 16 Hungarian folksongs, voice and piano:
  • Five songs
5 Ungarische Volkslieder piano 1873 S.245
Virág-dal (Chant des Fleurs), piano, Op. 43 (c. 1875) Additions and corrections 1880 S.383a
Elegáns csárdások (Csárdás nobles), 6 vols. (1884–86):
  • "Kertem alatt" (Vol. II, No. 1)
  • "Sarkantyú csárdás" (Vol. III, No. 6)[1]
Hungarian Rhapsody No. 19 in D minor 1885 S.244/19
piano 4-hands 1885? S.623a

Gregorio Allegri[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Miserere mei, Deus (1630s) À la chapelle Sixtine (organ version: Evocation à la Chapelle Sixtine)[2]> piano 1862 S.461
  • This piece combines Allegri's Miserere with Mozart's Ave verum corpus, K.618 (1791). (Mozart was deeply involved in the circumstances that led to the first publication of the Miserere: He heard it in the Sistine Chapel when visiting Rome at the age of 15, and famously wrote it down from memory, although publishing the work or even writing it down was prohibited on pain of excommunication. Rather than imposing this penalty, however, the Pope later congratulated Mozart on his genius).
  • À la chapelle Sixtine was the basis of the third movement (Preghiera) of Tchaikovsky's "Mozartiana" (Orchestral Suite No. 4), but he used only the Ave verum corpus component.
organ c.1862 S.658
piano 4‑hands c.1865 S.633
orchestra  ? S.360

Alexander Alyabyev[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "The Nightingale" (1825) Deux Mélodies russes:
  • No. 1, "Le Rossignol, air russe d'Alabieff"
piano 1842 S.250/1 No. 2 was Chanson bohémienne, after a work by Pyotr Bulakhov

Note: The Mazurka pour piano composée par un amateur de St. Pétersbourg, paraphrasée par F. L. (S.384) was based on a mazurka that has often been misattributed to Alyabyev, but was in fact written by Mikhail Vielgorski.[1]

Jacques Arcadelt[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Three-part madrigal Nous voyons que les hommes Alleluja et Ave Maria d'Arcadelt piano 1862 S.183 The Alleluja was based on themes from Liszt's own Cantico del sol di San Francesco d'Assisi, S.4.[3] The Ave Maria was based on Pierre-Louis Dietsch's Ave Maria, a setting for unaccompanied voices (1842?) loosely based on Arcadelt's madrigal Nous voyons que les hommes.[1]
organ S.659

Thomas Arne[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Rule, Britannia!" (1740) Grande paraphrase de concert sur "God Save the Queen" et "Rule Britannia" piano and orchestra 1841 S.694 Grove says this was unfinished, and refers to it as "Fantasia on English themes" (piano solo).[4] The Grosse Fantasie was a reworking of the Grande paraphrase de concert.[1]
Grosse Fantasie über "God Save the Queen" und "Rule Britannia" piano 4-hands S.755a

Daniel Auber[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera La muette de Portici (1828) Tarantelle di bravura d'après la tarantelle de La Muette de Portici piano 1846 S.386
Two pieces on themes from La muette de Portici S.387 One of the pieces is on the Berceuse[5]
Opera La fiancée (1829):
  • Aria "Montagnard ou berger"
Grande Fantaisie sur la tyrolienne de l'opéra La Fiancée 1829 S.385 Published as Op. 1; dedicated to Frédéric Chopin[5]
"Tyrolean Melody" S.385a

Johann Sebastian Bach[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Cantata Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen, BWV 12 Prelude on the theme of Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen piano 1859 S.179 The Variations, S.180/673 are based on the same theme.[6]
Variations on a theme of Bach (aka Variations on Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen) piano 1862 S.180 This set of variations uses the basso continuo of the second movement of the cantata Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen, base for the Crucifixus from the Mass in B minor. It is based on the same theme as the Prelude, S.179.
organ 1863 S.673
Cantata Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis, BWV 21:
  • Introduction and Fugue
Einleitung und Fuge aus der Motette 'Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis' und Andante 'Aus tiefer Not' organ 1860 S.660
Cantata Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, BWV 38:
  • Andante
Great Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, BWV 542 (organ) Fantasia and Fugue in G minor piano pub. 1863 S.463
6 Preludes and Fugues (organ), BWV 543-548 6 Preludes and Fugues 1842‑50 S.462 The Preludes and Fugues are: 1. A minor, BWV 543; 2. C major, BWV 545; 3. C minor, BWV 546; 4. C major, BWV 547; 5. E minor, BWV 548; and 6. B minor, BWV 544.[7]
Chaconne in D minor, BWV 1004 Transcription 1880 - Liszt planned this transcription but never executed it.[8]
Sonata No. 4 in C minor, violin and harpsichord, BWV 1017
  • III. Adagio
Adagio vom Bach organ 1861-63 S.661 Liszt arranged only the final 4 bars, the rest being the work of Alexander Wilhelm Gottschalg (1827–1908).[2]

Giuseppe Baini[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Chorus "O Roma nobilis" Arrangement mixed chorus and orchestra c. 1879 S.54 [1]
organ S.669c
piano S.506b

Ludwig van Beethoven[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Adelaide", Op. 46 (1795) Transcription piano 1839 S.466
Septet in E-flat, Op. 20 (1800) 1841 S.465 Dedicated to Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna of Russia[9]
piano 4‑hands S.634
Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 (1800) Arrangement 2 pianos 1878-79 S.657a/1 Includes a new cadenza for 1st movement, S.389a.[1]
6 Gellert Lieder, Op. 48 (1802) Sechs geistliche Lieder piano 1840 S.467 Liszt's order of the songs (with the original order in brackets) was: 1 (5). "Gottes Macht und Vorsehung"; 2 (1). "Bitten"; 3 (6). "Bußlied"; 4 (3). "Vom Tode"; 5 (2) "Die Liebe des Nächsten"; 6 (6). "Die Ehre Gottes aus der Natur (Die Himmel rühmen)".[10]
Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58 (1806) Arrangement 2 pianos 1878-79 S.657a/2
Coriolan Overture, Op. 62 (1807) Transcription piano  ? S.739 Lost[11]
6 Songs, Op. 75 (1809) "Beethoven's Lieder von Goethe":
  1. "Mignon", Kennst du das Land, Op. 75/1
  2. "Mit einem gemalten Band", Op. 83/3
  3. "Freudvoll und leidvoll", Op. 84/4
  4. "Mephistos Flohlied", Es war einmal ein König, Op. 75/3
  5. "Wonne der Wehmut", Op. 83/1
  6. "Die Trommel gerühret", Op. 84/1
1849 S.468 Liszt combined parts of three disparate Beethoven opuses into his transcription, the common thread being that all the words were by Goethe:
  • from 6 Songs, Op. 75: No. 1 ("Mignon") was S.468/1; No. 3 ("Mephistos Flohlied") was S.468/4
  • from 3 Songs, Op. 83: No. 1 ("Wonne der Wehmut") became S.468/5; No. 3 ("Mit einem gemalten Band") was S.468/2
  • from the Egmont incidental music, Op. 84: No. 1 (Lied "Die Trommel gerühret") was S.468/6; and No. 4 (Lied "Freudvoll und leidvoll") became S.468/3.[12]
3 Songs, Op. 83 (1810)
Egmont, incidental music, Op. 84 (1810)
Overture  ? S.740 Lost[11]
Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat, "Emperor", Op. 73 (1811) Arrangement 2 pianos 1878-79 S.657a/3
The Ruins of Athens, incidental music, Op. 113 (1811) Capriccio alla turca sur des motifs de Beethoven (Ruines d'Athènes) piano 1846 S.388 Uses same theme as the Fantasia, S.389
Fantasia on (themes from) 'The Ruins of Athens' piano and orchestra 1848-52 S.122 Uses same theme as the Capriccio, S.388; FP of orch. version Budapest, 1 June 1853, Hans von Bülow (piano), Ferenc Erkel (conductor);[13] same concert as the FP of the Hungarian Fantasy
2 pianos after 1852 S.649
piano pub. 1865 S.389
Song cycle An die ferne Geliebte, Op. 98 (1816) Transcription 1849 S.469
9 Symphonies (1800–24) Transcription 1837-64 S.464 Symphonies Nos. 5, 6 and 7 were transcribed in 1837; the Marcia funèbre of Symphony No. 3 was written in 1841; then there was a gap of 22 years before the remaining symphonies were written, at which time the existing transcriptions were revised.[9] In the meantime, Liszt completed a transcription of Symphony No. 9 for two pianos in 1851.[2]
Transcription 2 pianos 1851 S.657
String quartets (1800–26) Projected transcription piano 1863 - Liszt planned to transcribe the quartets for piano but never executed the plan.[8]

Vincenzo Bellini[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera La sonnambula (1831) Fantaisie sur des motifs favoris de l'opéra La Sonnambula piano 1839 S.393
piano 4‑hands c.1852 S.627
Opera Norma (1831) Reminiscences de Norma piano 1841 S.394
2 pianos after 1841 S.655
Opera I puritani (1835) Reminiscences des Puritains piano 1836 S.390 Dedicated to Princess Belgiojoso. The latter section was re-used in the Introduction et Polonaise (S.391).[5]
I Puritani: Introduction et Polonaise 1840 S.391 The Polonaise is the latter section of the Reminiscences, S.390
Hexameron, morceau de concert. Grandes Variations de Bravoure sur le marche des Puritains piano 1837 S.392 Includes variations by Frédéric Chopin, Carl Czerny, Henri Herz, Johann Peter Pixis and Sigismond Thalberg. Dedicated to Princess Belgiojoso. The 2-piano version is much shortened. An extant version for piano and orchestra is by an unknown hand.[14]
2 pianos after 1837 S.654

Hector Berlioz[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Overture Les francs-juges, Op. 3 (1826) Ouverture des Francs-Juges piano 1833 S.471
Overture Le carnaval romain, Op. 9 (1843) Transcription  ? S.741 This was part of Liszt's performing repertoire, but is now lost[11]
Symphonie fantastique, Op. 14 (1830) Episode de la vie d'un artiste. Grande Symphonie fantastique. Partition de Piano c.1833 S.470 In c. 1864-65 Liszt made a new transcription of the 4th movement, "March au supplice".[10]
L'idée fixe. Andante amoroso S.395 Based on the theme of the Symphonie
Lélio, Op. 14b (1831) Grande Fantaisie Symphonique on themes from Berlioz’ Lélio piano and orchestra 1834 S.120 The themes are "Chant du pêcheur" and "Chant des brigands"; orchestration probably not by Liszt; FP Paris, 24 November 1834, Liszt (piano), Berlioz (conductor)[13]
Overture Le roi Lear, Op. 4 (1831) Ouverture du Roi Lear piano 1836 S.474
Harold en Italie, Op. 16 (1834) Transcription viola and piano S.472
Marche des Pèlerins piano S.473
Opera Benvenuto Cellini, Op. 23 (1838) Bénédiction et serment, deux motifs de Benvenuto Cellini 1852 S.396
piano 4‑hands 1853 S.628
La damnation de Faust, Op. 24 (1846) Danse des Sylphes piano c.1846 S.475

Louise Bertin[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera La Esmeralda (1836) Transcription of orchestral score piano 1837 S.476
  • No. 10, "D'ici vous pourrez voir, sans être vu"
3 morceaux detachés d‘Esmeralda S.477a
  • No. 11, "Quoi! lui"
  • No. 13, Quasimodo's aria "Mon Dieu! j'aime"
  • No. 13, Quasimodo's aria "Mon Dieu! j'aime"
Air chanté par Massol S.477 Massol was the baritone Jean-Étienne-Auguste Massol, who created the role of Quasimodo

János Bihari[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Lassú magyar, Hungarian slow dance (c.1820) "Zum Andenken", 2 movements of Hungarian character piano 1828 S.241/2 Bihari's dance was used in the second movement; the first was based on music by László Fáy.[1]

Giovanni Bononcini[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Canzonetta "Vado ben spesso cangiando loco" Années de pèlerinage, Deuxième année: Italie: No. 3 "Canzonetta del Salvator Rosa" piano 1849 S.161/3 This song, among many others, was long attributed to Salvator Rosa[15]

Alexander Borodin[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Paraphrases (piano; 1879):
  • No. 2, Polka in C major
Prélude à la Polka d'Alexandre Porfiryevitch Borodine piano 1880 S.207a This was previously catalogued as Variation über das Thema von Borodin, S.256[1] (which was also referred to as Variations on the "Chopsticks" theme").[16]

René de Galard de Béarn, Marquis de Brassac[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
"Pastorale" Chanson du Béarn piano 1844 S.236/2 Brassac's piece is not otherwise identified. Liszt's arrangement was published as No. 2 of "Faribolo Pastour and Chanson du Béarn".[1]

Pyotr Bulakhov[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
"Bohemian Song" Deux Mélodies Russes:
  • No. 2, "Chanson bohémienne"
piano 1842-43 S.250/2 No. 1 was "Le Rossignol, air russe d'Alabieff", after "The Nightingale" by Alexander Alyabyev
Song "You Will Not Believe" Russischer Galop 1843 S.478

Hans von Bülow[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Mazurka-Fantasie, Op. 13 (piano; 1860) Orchestration orchestra 1865 S.351
Wenn sie euch grüsst mit freundlicher Gebärde ("Dante's Sonett"), Op. 22 (1865) Transcription, as Tanto gentile e tanto onesta piano 1874 S.479

Frédéric Chopin[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Mazurka in C-sharp minor, Op. 6/2 (piano; 1830)[17] Duo (Sonata) sur des thèmes polonais violin and piano 1832‑35 S.127
24 Preludes, Op. 28 (piano; pub. 1839):
  • No. 4 in E minor
  • No. 9 in E major
Transcription organ 1862-63 S.662
Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35:
  • III. Marche funèbre
Transcription organ, cello and piano  ? S.761 Lost[11]
Fantaisie in F minor, piano, Op. 49 Transcription piano and orchestra - - This was planned but never executed.[8]
17 Polish songs, Op.posth. 74 (1827–47):
  • No. 1, "Życzenie" ("The Maiden's Wish"
Glanes de Woronince: II. "Mélodies polonaises" piano 1847-48 S.249/2 The order of the songs in S.480 is: 1. "Mädchens Wünsch" (= No. 1, "Życzenie"); 2. "Frühling" (= No. 2, "Wiosna"); 3. "Das Ringlein" (= No. 14, "Pierścień"); 4. "Bacchanal" (= No. 4, "Hulanka"); 5. "Meine Freuden" (= No. 12, "Moja pieszczotka"); 6. "Heimkehr" (= No. 15, "Narzeczony")

"Das Ringlein" leads without a break into "Bacchanal", and towards the end of the latter song, immediately before the coda, Liszt includes a short 6-bar reprise of the earlier song.

6 Chants polonais 1847-60 S.480
  • No. 2, "Wiosna" ("Spring")
  • No. 4, "Hulanka" ("Merrymaking")
  • No. 12, "Moja pieszczotka" ("My Joys")
  • No. 14, "Pierścień" ("The Ring")
  • No. 15, "Narzeczony" ("The Bridegroom")

August Conradi[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
2 Zigenuerpolkas, Op. 5 (orchestra; 1843)
  • No. 2 in E minor
Le Célèbre Zigeunerpolka piano 1848 S.481 Conradi was Liszt's copyist at Weimar for a number of years, and a minor composer in his own right.

Peter Cornelius[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
2nd overture to opera Der Barbier von Bagdad, Completion orchestra 1877 S.352 Completed by Liszt from Cornelius's sketches

Guillaume-Louis Cottrau[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Tarantella Venezia e Napoli (1st version)
  • No. 4, Tarantelles napolitaines
piano 1840 S.159 The Tarantella is not otherwise identified. S.162 is a revision of S.159.[1]
Années de pèlerinage, Deuxième Année: Italie. Supplement: Venezia e Napoli
  • No. 3, Tarantella da Guillaume Louis Cottrau
1859 S.162

César Cui[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Tarantelle, Op. 12 (orchestra; 1858) Transcription piano 1885 S.482

Alexander Dargomyzhsky[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Tarantella slave (piano 4-hands, 1864–65)[1] Tarantelle, transcrite et amplifiée pour le piano à deux mains piano 1879 S.483

Ferdinand David[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Bunte Reihe, 24 pieces in all the major and minor keys,[18] Op. 30, violin and piano (c.1840; pub 1851)[19] Transcription piano 1850 S.484
  • No. 19 in A major ("Ungarisch")
Fantasy[18]  ? S.484/19bis
  • No. 22 in B-flat minor ("In russischer Weise")
Souvenir de Russie 1842 S.483bis This publication contained no attribution to Ferdinand David as the source of the material.[20]

Léo Delibes[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Jean de Nivelle (1880):
  • Ballade "Tant que le jour dure"
La mandragore piano 1881 S.698

Josef Dessauer[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
3 Lieder: "Lockung", "Zwei Wege", "Spanisches Lied" (by 1845) Lieder piano 1847 S.485

Anton Diabelli[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Waltz Variation on a Waltz by Diabelli piano 1822 S.147 One of 50 variations on the same waltz written by 50 different composers
for Vaterländischer Künstlerverein. Liszt's variation was No. 24.

Pierre-Louis Dietsch[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Ave Maria Alleluja et Ave Maria d'Arcadelt piano 1862 S.183 The Alleluja was based on themes from Liszt's own Cantico del sol di San Francesco d'Assisi, S.4.[3] The Ave Maria was based on Dietsch's Ave Maria, a setting for unaccompanied voices (1842?) loosely based on Jacques Arcadelt's three-part madrigal Nous voyons que les hommes.[1]
organ S.659

Gaetano Donizetti[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Lucrezia Borgia (1833) Reminiscences de Lucrezia Borgia piano 1840 S.400 The sections are: (1) Trio du second acte and (2) Fantaisie sur des motifs favoris de l'opéra: Chanson à boire (Orgie), Duo and Finale[14]
Opera Lucia di Lammermoor (1835) Reminiscences de Lucia di Lammermoor 1835‑36 S.397 Based on the Sextet
Marche et cavatine de Lucie de Lammermoor S.398 Intended as part of the Reminiscences (S.397) but separated by the publisher[14]
Lucia di Lammermoor Valse à capriccio sur deux motifs de Lucia et Parisina 1842 S.401 Combines motifs from Lucia di Lammermoor and Parisina. The Valse à capriccio, S.401 was revised as No. 3 of 3 Caprices-Valses, S.214 (1850–52).[1]
Opera Parisina (1833)
Nuits d'été à Pausilippe, 12 ariettas and nocturnes (voices and chamber ensemble; 1836):
  • No. 1, "Barcajuolo"
  • No. 9, "L'Alito di Bice"
  • No. 4, "La Torre di Biasone"
Nuits d'été à Pausilippe 1838 S.399 [14][21]
Opera La favorite (1840):
  • Duettino (Act IV)
Spirito gentil 1847 S.400a Possibly same as S.742.
Opera Dom Sébastien (1843):
  • Funeral march
Marche funèbre de Dom Sébastien 1844 S.402
  • Act IV
Paraphrase  ? S.744 Lost; this was based on Theodor Kullak's transcription (paraphrase), Op. 31,[22] which was itself dedicated to Liszt.[23]
"Duettino" Transcription  ? S.742 Lost.[11] Possibly same as S.400a.

Giuseppe Donizetti[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Mecidiye March Grande Paraphrase de la marche de Donizetti composée pour Sa Majesté le sultan Abdul Medjid-Khan piano 1847 S.403 Giuseppe was the elder brother of the opera composer Gaetano Donizetti. A simplified version of this paraphrase was also published.[14]

Felix Draeseke[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Helges Treue" Recitation "Helges Treue" voice/piano 1860 S.686
Cantata Der Schwur im Rütli (1862–63, rev. 1868)[1] Reduction of Part I piano 1870 S.485a

Béni Egressy and Ferenc Erkel[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Patriotic songs, "Szózat" (Egressy) and "Himnusz" (Erkel) "Szózat und Ungarischer Hymnus" orchestra 1870‑73 S.353 "Szózat" (words Mihály Vörösmarty, 1836; music Egressy, 1840) and "Himnusz" (words Ferenc Kölcsey, 1823; music Erkel) are national anthems of Hungary adopted in 1844; FP of orchestral version, Budapest, 19 March 1873, Liszt (conductor).[24]
piano S.486
piano 4‑hands S.628a

Ferenc Erkel[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Patriotic song "Himnusz" "Szózat und Ungarischer Hymnus" see above Erkel's Himnusz was combined with Béni Egressy's "Szózat" in three versions
Opera Hunyadi László (1844) Schwanengesang and March piano 1847 S.405 Liszt was the godfather of Erkel's son, who was born in the autumn of 1856 but died in 1863.[25]

Ernest II, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Die Gräberinsel" (1842)[1] Transcription piano 1842 S.485b Ernst Herzog zu Sachsen-Coburg-Gotha was an amateur composer; he was the brother of Queen Victoria's consort Prince Albert.
Opera Tony, oder die Vergeltung (1849) Halloh! Jagdchor und Steyrer 1849 S.404
Opera Diana von Solange (1858) Festmarsch nach Motiven von E.H.z.S.-C.-G.[13] orchestra 1857 S.116
piano 1859 S.522
piano 4‑hands S.607

László Fáy[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Kinizsi notája, Hungarian dance (1822) "Zum Andenken", 2 movements of Hungarian character piano 1828 S.241/1 Fáy's dance was used in the first movement; the second was based on music by János Bihari.[1]

Leó Festetics[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Spanisches Ständchen" (by 1844)[1] Transcription piano 1846 S.487
Les noces du Pâtre, mélodies hongroises, piano (1858) Corrections and alterations to manuscript score[1] 1858 S.405a

John Field[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
12 Nocturnes (piano) Transcription piano 4-hands c. 1866 S.577a

Robert Franz[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Er ist gekommen in Sturm und Regen", Op. 4/7 (1845) Transcription piano 1848 S.488
12 Lieder from Opp. 2, 3 and 8 12 Lieder von Robert Franz (3 books) 1849 S.489
  • Book I (1-5) is the 5 Schilflieder, Op. 2: "Auf geheimen Waldespfaden", "Drüben geht die Sonne scheiden", "Trübe wird's", "Sonnenuntergang", "Auf dem Teich"
  • Book II (6-8) contains: "Der Schalk", Op. 3/1, "Der Bote", Op. 8/1, and "Meerestille", Op. 8/2
  • Book III (9-12) contains: "Treibt der Sommer seinen Rosen", Op. 8/5, "Gewitternacht", Op. 8/6, "Das ist ein Brausen und Heulen", Op. 8/4, and "Frühling und Liebe", Op. 3/3.[1][26]

Robert von Gallenberg[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Die Amazonen, ballet (1823) 2 Waltzes:
  • No. 2, Waltz aus dem Ballet Die Amazonen
violin and piano 1823-25 S.126b/2 Count Wenzel Robert von Gallenberg (1783–1839)[1]
piano S.208a/2

Manuel García[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera El poeta calculista (1805):
  • Aria "Yo que soy contrabandista"[1]
Rondeau fantastique sur un thème espagnol piano 1836 S.252

Ludmilla Gizycka-Zámoyská[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "A Puszta Keserve" (Lenau) Puszta-Wehmut piano 1871 S.246 Gizycka-Zámoyská was born 1829.[1]
violin and piano 1880 S.379b

Mikhail Glinka[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Ruslan and Lyudmila (1842):
  • "Chernomor's March" (Act IV, No.19)
Tscherkessenmarsch piano 1843-75 S.406
piano 4-hands 1875 S.629

Adalbert von Goldschmidt[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Cantata Die sieben Todsünden (1875):
  • Liebesszene und Fortunas Kugel
Transcription piano 1880 S.490

Charles Gounod[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Faust (1859):
  • Waltz and duet "O nuit d'amour" (Act II)
Valse de l'opéra Faust piano by 1861 S.407
  • Soldiers' Chorus, "Gloire immortelle de nos aieux" (Act IV)
Transcription 1864 S.743 Lost[11]
Opera La reine de Saba (1862):
  • Berceuse
Les Sabéennes. Berceuse de l'opéra La Reine de Saba pub. 1865 S.408
Hymne à Sainte-Cécile (1865 version for violin solo, harps,
timpani, wind instruments and double basses)[1]
Transcription 1866 S.491
Opera Roméo et Juliette (1867) Les Adieux. Reverie sur un motif de l'opéra Roméo et Juliette pub. 1868 S.409

Fromental Halévy[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera La Juive (1835) Reminiscences de La Juive piano 1835 S.409a
Opera Le guitarréro (1841) Fantaisie sur des thèmes de l'opéra Guitarero 1841 S.743a Lost[1]

George Frideric Handel[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Almira, HWV 1 (1705) "Sarabande and Chaconne from Handel's Almira" piano 1879 S.181

Johann von Herbeck[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Tanz-Momente, Op. 14, orchestra (1868) Transcription piano 1869 S.492 A version for piano 4-hands was also published.[27]

Ferdinand Huber[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Receuil de Ranz des vaches (1830) Album d'un voyageur: Book III, Paraphrases:
  • No. 10, Improvisata sur le Ranz des vaches (Départ pour les Alpes; Aufzug auf die Alp)
piano 1835‑36 S.156/10 Ferdinand Fürchtegott Huber (1791–1863). Revised as Ranz de vaches (Montée aux Alpes: Improvisata)
Ranz des chèvres (? 1830) Album d'un voyageur: Book III, Paraphrases:
  • No. 12, Rondeau sur le Ranz des chèvres
S.156/12 Re-issued as Ranz de chèvres de F. Huber (1837–38), and revised as Ranz de chèvres. Rondeau, No. 1 of 3 Morceaux suisses (1876–77).[1]
3 Morceaux suisses:
  • No. 1, Ranz de chèvres. Rondeau
1876-77 S.156a/1

Johann Nepomuk Hummel[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Septet in D minor, Op. 74 (piano, flute, oboe, horn, viola, cello, double bass) Edition piano, flute, oboe, horn, viola, 2 cellos  ? - Liszt transcribed the work for piano solo, in 2 versions. He also produced his own edition of the original work but provided an alternative scoring in which a second cello replaced the double bass.[28]
Transcription piano 1848; c.1866 S.493

Ernest Knop[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Air suisse varié, guitar (1830) Album d'un voyageur: Book III, Paraphrases:
  • No. 11, Nocturne sur le Chant Montagnard
piano 1835‑36 S.156/11 Re-issued as Un soir dans la montagne. Mélodie d'Ernest Knop. Nocturne (1837–38); revised as Un soir dans les montagnes (Nocturne pastoral), No. 3 of 3 Morceaux suisses (1876–77).[1]
3 Morceaux suisses:
  • No. 3, Un soir dans les montagnes (Nocturne pastoral)
1876-77 S.156a/3

Francis Korbay[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Le matin" (words by Georges Bizet) 2 Lieder von Francis Korbay voice and orchestra 1883 S.368/1 Korbay was a godson of Liszt and a well-known performer of his music.
Song "Gebet" (words by Emanuel Geibel) S.368/2
"Gebet" voice and organ 1883? S.683a

Josef Krov[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Těšme se blahou nadějć" (c. 1824) Hussitenlied (from the 15th Century) piano 1840 S.234 This drinking song by Josef Theodor Krov (1797–1859) to words by Václav Hanka was erroneously identified by the publisher as an early Hussite hymn. The tune was extensively quoted in Balfe's The Bohemian Girl as a patriotic song.[29][30]
piano 4‑hands 1840‑41 S.620

Charles Philippe Lafont[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Romance "Le départ du jeune marin" Grand duo concertant sur la romance de M. Lafont "Le Marin" violin and piano 1835-37 S.700h [17]
1849 S.128 Revised version

Eduard Lassen[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
6 Lieder von Peter Cornelius, Op. 5:
  • No. 3, "Löse, Himmel, meine Seele"
Transcription piano 1861-72 S.494 Liszt wrote 2 versions[1]
  • No. 4, "Ich weil' in tiefer Einsamkeit"
Transcription 1872 S.495
Incidental music to Hebbel's Die Nibelungen, Op. 47 (1873) Aus der Musik zu Hebbels Nibelungen und Goethes Faust:
  • I. Nibelungen1. "Hagen und Kriemhild"; 2. "Bechlarn"
  • II. Faust: 1. "Osterhymne"; 2. "Hoffestlische Marsch und Polonaise"
1878‑79 S.496
Incidental music to Goethe's Faust, Op. 57 (1876)
Incidental music to Calderón's Über allen Zauber Liebe, Op. 73 (1883):
  • Intermezzo
Symphonisches Zwischenspiel c.1882 S.497 Calderón's 1635 play is known in Spanish as El mayor encanto, amor, and in English as Love, the Greatest Enchantment.

Orlande de Lassus[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Regina coeli laetare, motet for unaccompanied voices (1604) Transcription organ 1865 S.663

Otto Lessmann[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
3 Songs from J. Wolff's Tannhäuser, Op. 27 (1881):
  • "Der Lenz ist gekommen"
  • "Trinklied"
  • "Du schaust mich an"
Transcription piano c.1882 S.498 Otto Lessmann (1844–1918)[1]

Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
 ? Élégie sur des motifs du Prince Louis Ferdinand de Prusse piano 1842 S.168 Prince Louis Ferdinand was an amateur composer whose musical gifts were nevertheless held in high esteem by such as Beethoven, who dedicated his Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor to the Prince.

Sir Alexander Mackenzie[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera The Troubador, Op. 33 (1886) Transcription piano 1886 - This was planned but Liszt never went past the sketching stage.[8]

Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna of Russia[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Es hat geflammt die ganze Nacht" Arrangement voice and piano 1849-54 S.685
Theme 6 Consolations: No. 4, Quasi adagio piano 1849-50 S.172/4 [6]

Jules Massenet[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Marche hongroise de Szabady, orchestra, 1879 Revive Szegedin: Marche hongroise piano 1879 S.572 Massenet based his work on Marche turque-hongroise by Frank Ignac Szabadi (1825–79); Liszt's transcription was inscribed Revive Szegedin: Marche hongroise transcrite d'après l'orchestration de J. Massenet

Felix Mendelssohn[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Songs Without Words:
  • Book I, Op. 19b: Nos. 1-3[31]
Grosses Konzertstück über Mendelssohns Lieder ohne Worte 2 pianos 1834 S.257 Liszt and a student, Mlle. Vial, started to perform it in Paris on 9 April 1835[16] but Liszt became ill. Ferruccio Busoni, who considered Mendelssohn a composer of genius, died before fulfilling his plan to play it with Egon Petri in London. It was first performed in full by Richard and John Contiguglia at the 1984 Holland Liszt Festival in Utrecht.[32]
6 Songs, Op. 19a (1830-34):
  • 2 songs
Mendelssohn Lieder:
  • "Auf Flügeln des Gesanges", Op. 34/2
  • "Sonntagslied", Op. 34/5
  • "Reiselied", Op. 34/6
  • "Neue Liebe", Op. 19a/4
  • "Frühlingslied", Op. 47/3
  • "Winterlied", Op. 19a/3
  • "Suleika", Op. 34/4
piano 1840 S.547
6 Songs, Op. 34 (1834-37):
  • 4 songs
6 Songs, Op. 47 (1839):
  • 1 song
6 Songs for male chorus, Op. 50 (1837‑40):
  • 2 songs
  • "Wasserfahrt", Op. 50/4
  • "Der Jäger Abschied", Op. 50/2
1848 S.548
A Midsummer Night's Dream, incidental music, Op. 61 (1842) Wedding March and Dance of the Elves 1849‑50 S.410

Saverio Mercadante[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Il giuramento (1837) Réminiscences de La Scala piano 1837‑38 S.458 This work uses three themes from Il giuramento and a fourth theme that is as yet unidentified.[33] The piece also appeared as Fantasia on Italian Operatic Melodies.[34] It was listed in the Searle catalogue as "Piano piece on Italian operatic melodies", the writers of which were listed as "unknown".[9]
Soirées italiennes, 8 ariettas and 4 duos:
  • No. 2, "La primavera: Canzonetta"
  • No. 10, "Il galop"
  • No. 4, "Il pastore svizzero: Tirolese"
  • No. 5, "La serenata del marinaro"
  • No. 11, "Il Brindisi: Rondoletto"
  • No. 8, "La zingarella spagnola: Bolero"
Soirées italiennes: Six amusements sur des motifs de Mercadante 1838 S.411 Dedicated to Archduchess Elizabeth of Austria.[35][36]

Giacomo Meyerbeer[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Robert le diable (1831) Reminiscences de Robert le Diable. Valse infernale piano 1841 S.413
piano 4-hands 1841‑43 S.630
Opera Les Huguenots (1836) Grande Fantaisie sur des thèmes de l'opéra Les Huguenots piano 1836 S.412 Dedicated to Marie d'Agoult[36]
Song "Le Moine" ("Die Mönch") (1841) "Le Moine" 1841 S.416 Incorporates two other themes by Meyerbeer.[36]
Opera Le prophète (1849) Illustrations du Prophète piano 1849-50 S.414 The 3 Illustrations of S.414 are: 1. Prière, hymne triomphale, marche du sacre; 2. Les Patineurs, scherzo; 3. Choeur pastoral, appel aux armes. The Fantasy and Fugue is sometimes listed as No. 4 in the series[36]
Fantasie und Fuge über den Choral "Ad nos, ad salutarem undam" organ S.259
piano 4‑hands
or pedal piano
S.624
Festmarsch zu Schillers 100-jähriger Geburtsfeier (1859) Transcription piano 1860 S.549
Opera L'Africaine (1864):
  • Sailors' Prayer "O grand Saint Dominique" (Act III)
  • Indian March (Act IV)
Illustrations de l'Africaine 1865 S.415 The two Illustrations are: 1. Prière des matelots; 2. Marche indienne.

Mihály Mosonyi[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Szép Ilon (1861) Fantaisie sur l'opéra hongrois Szép Ilonka piano 1867 S.417 Dedicated to Mosonyi[36]
Funeral Music for István Széchenyi, piano (1860) Historische ungarische Bildnisse:
  • No. 4, "Ladislaus Teleki / Teleki László"
1885 S.205 Uses basso ostinato.[1]
Trauervorspiel und Trauermarsch:
  • No. 2, Marcia funebre
1885 S.206 Uses main theme.[1]

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera The Marriage of Figaro, K.492 (1786) Fantasy on Themes from Mozart's 'Figaro' and 'Don Giovanni' piano 1842 S.697 Performed Berlin 11 January 1843; edited and completed by Ferruccio Busoni[4]
Opera Don Giovanni, K.527 (1787) 1842 S.697
Reminiscences de Don Juan 1841 S.418 Dedicated to King Christian VIII of Denmark[36]
2 pianos after 1841 S.656
Motet Ave verum corpus, K.618 (1791) À la chapelle Sixtine

(organ version: Evocation à la Chapelle Sixtine)[2]
piano 1862 S.461 This piece combines Allegri's Miserere (1630s) with Mozart's Ave verum corpus. (Mozart was deeply involved in the circumstances that led to the first publication of the Miserere: He heard it in the Sistine Chapel when visiting Rome at the age of 15, and famously wrote it down from memory, although publishing the work or even writing it down was prohibited on pain of excommunication. Rather than imposing this penalty, the Pope later congratulated him on his genius). À la chapelle Sixtine was the basis of the third movement (Preghiera) of Tchaikovsky's "Mozartiana" (Orchestral Suite No. 4), but he used only the Ave verum corpus component.
organ c.1862 S.658
piano 4‑hands c.1865 S.633
orchestra  ? S.360
Opera The Magic Flute, K.620 (1791):
  • Overture
Transcription piano  ? S.748 This was part of Liszt's performing repertoire but is now lost.[11]
  • "Der, welcher wandelt diese Straße voll Beschwerden" (Act II)
Adagio von Die Zauberflöte piano 4-hands 1875-81 S.634a
Requiem in D minor, K.626 (1791):
  • "Confutatis" and "Lacrymosa"
Transcription piano pub. 1865 S.550

Otto Nicolai[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Ecclesiastical Festival Overture on the
chorale "Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott", Op. 31
Transcription organ 1852 S.675

Giovanni Pacini[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Niobe (1826) Divertissement sur le cavatine "I tuoi frequenti palpiti" piano 1835-36 S.419

Niccolò Paganini[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
24 Caprices for Solo Violin, Op. 1 (1802–17)[37] Études d'exécution transcendante d'après Paganini (S.140): piano 1838‑51 S.140, 141 Paganini's Caprices Nos. 1, 6, 9, 17 and 24 were the basis of Nos. 4, 1, 5, 2 and 6 respectively of Liszt's Études d'exécution transcendante d'après Paganini (S.140). La campanella became Étude No. 3. The set of 6 Études were revised as Grandes études de Paganini (S.141). La campanella had earlier been the basis of a separate work, the Grande Fantaisie de bravoure (S.420).[38]
Violin Concerto No. 2 in B minor, Op. 7 (1826):
  • III. La campanella[37]
Grande Fantaisie de bravoure sur la Clochette 1831-32 S.420
Il carnevale di Venezia, violin and orchestra, Op. 10 (1829) Variations sur le Carnaval de Venise 1843 S.700a
Grande Fantaisie sur des thèmes de Paganini (S.700/1):
  • revised as Variations de bravoure sur des thèmes de Paganini (S.700/2)
1845 S.700 [1]

Luigi Pantaleoni[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Barcarole vénitienne, song for solo voice (1840?) Arrangement voice and piano 1840 S.684

Giovanni Battista Perucchini[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "La Biondina in Gondoletta" Venezia e Napoli (1st version)
  • No. 3, Andante placido
piano 1840 S.159/3 S.162 is a revision of S.159.[1]
Années de pèlerinage, Deuxième Année: Italie. Supplement: Venezia e Napoli
  • No. 1, Gondoliera
1859 S.162/1

F. Pezzini[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
"Una stella amica" Transcription piano 1874‑75 S.551 Pezzini was a local band master at the Villa d'Este, but no further details about him are known. "Una stella amica" is variously described as a waltz[1][39] or a mazurka.[40]

Joachim Raff[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera König Alfred (1851):
  • Andante finale and March
Transcription piano 1853 S.421 Dedicated to Karl Klindworth[38]
piano 4-hands S.631
Tanz-Capricen, Op. 54, 3 pieces for piano (1852):
  • No. 1, Waltz in D major
New introduction and coda piano 1854 S.551a

Alexander Ritter[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
5 Charakterstücke, Op. 3, violin and organ (1873):
  • No. 1, In der Christmette
Revised and corrected violin and organ 1873? S.675a

Salvator Rosa (attrib.)[edit]

Original work Liszt work Notes
Canzonetta "Vado ben spesso cangiando loco" See Années de pèlerinage, Deuxième année: Italie at Giovanni Battista Bononcini above This song, among many others, was long attributed to Salvator Rosa, but was in fact written by Bononcini.[15]

Gioachino Rossini[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Otello (1816):
  • Gondolier's song "Nessun maggior dolore" (Act III)
Années de pèlerinage, Deuxième Année: Italie. Supplement: Venezia e Napoli
  • No. 2, Canzone
piano 1859 S.162/2
Operas Armida (1817) and La donna del lago (1819)[37] Impromptu brilliant sur des thèmes de Rossini et Spontini 1824 S.150 Also includes themes from operas by Gaspare Spontini
Opera La donna del lago[37] Sept variations brillantes sur un thème de G. Rossini S.149
Opera Mosè in Egitto (1818) Fantaisie sur des thèmes de 'Maometto' et 'Mose'  ? S.751 Lost[11]
Opera Le siège de Corinthe (1826) Introduction et variations sur une marche du Siège de Corinthe 1830 S.750 Lost[11]
Opera William Tell (1829) Transcription 1838 S.552
Les Soirées musicales, 8 ariettas and 4 duets (1835) La Serenata e l'Orgia. Grande Fantaisie sur des motifs des Soirées musicales 1835‑36 S.422 Nos. 10 and 11; also includes a theme from La promessa (No. 1)[38]
La pastorella dell'Alpi e Li marinari. 2me Fantaisie sur des motifs des Soirées musicales S.423 Nos. 6 and 12; also includes a theme from La regata veneziana (No. 2)[38]
Soirées musicales 1837 S.424 The 12 numbers are: 1. La promessa; 2. La regata veneziana; 3. L'invito; 4. La gita in gondola; 5. Il rimprovero; 6. La pastorella dell'Alpi; 7. La partenza; 8. La pesca; 9. La danza; 10. La serenata; 11. L'orgia; 12. Li marinari
Stabat Mater (1841):
  • No. 2, "Cujus animam"
Transcription organ/trombone 1860s S.679 Also used in S.553
tenor/organ pub. 1874 S.682
Deux Transcriptions d'après Rossini:
  • No. 1, "Cujus animam"
  • No. 2, "La Charité"
piano 1847 S.553
3 Choeurs religieux, female chorus and piano (1844):
  • No. 3, "La Charité"

Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "La Marseillaise" (1792) "La Marseillaise" piano 1872 S.237

Jean-Jacques Rousseau[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Le devin du village (1752) Transcription piano 1883 - This was planned but never executed.[8]

Anton Rubinstein[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
6 Lieder von Heine, Op. 32 (1856):
  • No. 6, "Der Asra"
Transcription piano 1883? S.554 [1]
12 Lieder des Mirza-Schaffy, Op. 34 (1854):
  • No. 9, "Gelb rollt mir zu Füßen"
1881
Transcription  ? S.752 Lost[11]
Étude on False Notes (piano; 1867) Revised as Étude sur des notes fausses 1880? S.554a

Camille Saint-Saëns[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Danse macabre, symphonic poem, Op. 40 (1874) Transcription piano 1876 S.555 Dedicated to Sophie Menter.[40]

Franz Schubert[edit]

Original work D no. Op. Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
"Gretchen am Spinnrade" (1814) D.118 Op. 2 6 Songs voice and orchestra 1860 S.375/2
12 Lieder von Franz Schubert piano 1838, rev. 1876 S.558/8
"Rastlose Liebe" (1815) D.138 Op. 5/1 12 Lieder von Franz Schubert 1838 S.558/10
Walzer, Ländler und Ecossaisen, piano D.145 Soirées de Vienne: 9 Valses caprices d'après Schubert 1852 S.427/2, 3 Used in Nos. 2 and 3[41]
"Des Mädchens Klage" (2nd version; 1815) D.191 Op. 58/3 No. 2 of Sechs Melodien von Franz Schubert 1844 S.563/2
"Meeres Stille" (1815) D.216 Op. 3/2 Transcription 1837 S.557b 1st version
12 Lieder von Franz Schubert 1838 S.558/5
"Der Erlkönig" (1815‑21) D.328 Op. 1 6 Songs voice and orchestra 1860 S.375/4
Transcription piano 1837 S.557b
12 Lieder von Franz Schubert 1838, rev. 1876 S.558/4
"Litanei (Auf das Fest Aller Seelen)" (1816) D.343 Transcription: Franz Schuberts geistliche Lieder 1840 S.562/1
Originaltänze, piano D.365 Op. 9 Apparitions: III. Fantaisie sur une valse de François Schubert (Molto agitato ed appassionato)[42] 1834 S.155/3 Waltz No. 33 in F major;[43] the same waltz appeared in Soirées de Vienne, S.427
Soirées de Vienne: 9 Valses caprices d'après Schubert 1852 S.427 Used in Nos. 1-5 and 9[41]
"Die gestirne" (1816) D.444 Transcription: Franz Schuberts geistliche Lieder 1840 S.562/3
"Der Wanderer" (1816) D.493 Op. 4/1 12 Lieder von Franz Schubert 1838, rev. 1876 S.558/11
"Die Forelle" (1817) D.550 No. 6 of Sechs Melodien von Franz Schubert 1844 S.563/6
Transcription (2nd version) 1846 S.564
"Himmelsfunken" (1819) D.651 Transcription: Franz Schuberts geistliche Lieder 1840 S.562/2
"Frühlingsglaube" D.686 Op. 20/2 Transcription 1837 S.557c 1st version
12 Lieder von Franz Schubert 1838, rev. 1876 S.558/7
"Lob der Tränen" D.711 Op. 13/2 Transcription 1838 S.557
Opera Alfonso und Estrella (1822):
  • Act I
D.732 Transcription  ? S.753 Liszt conducted the world premiere performance in Weimar, 24 June 1854; he had published an essay on the opera in advance of the first performance, and also had made cuts to the score for the production. The score of the transcription is lost.[11]
Wiener Damen-Ländler, piano D.734 Soirées de Vienne: 9 Valses caprices d'après Schubert 1852 S.427/1 Used in No. 1[41]
"Sei mir gegrüsst!" (1822) D.741 Op. 20/1 12 Lieder von Franz Schubert 1838 S.558/1
"Die Rose" (? 1820) D.745 Op. 73 Transcription 1835 S.556
Wanderer Fantasy in C, piano (1822) D.760 Op. 15 piano and orchestra by 1851 S.366 FP of orch. version Vienna, 14 December 1851, J. Egghard (piano), Hellmesberger (conductor)[44]
2 pianos S.653
"Auf dem Wasser zu singen" (1823) D.774 Op. 72 12 Lieder von Franz Schubert piano 1838 S.558/2
"Du bist die Ruh" (1823) D.776 Op. 59/3 12 Lieder von Franz Schubert 1838, rev. 1876 S.558/3
Valses sentimentales, piano D.779 Soirées de Vienne: 9 Valses caprices d'après Schubert 1852 S.427/6 Used in No. 6[41]
18 Deutsche und Ecossaisen, piano D.783 Soirées de Vienne: 9 Valses caprices d'après Schubert 1852 S.427 Used in Nos. 1, 3, 7 and 8[41]
Song cycle Die schöne Müllerin (1823): D.795 Op. 25
  • No. 1, "Das Wandern"
No. 1 of Müllerlieder 1846 S.565/1
  • No. 2, "Wohin?"
No. 5 of Müllerlieder S.565/5
  • No. 7, "Ungeduld"
No. 5 of Sechs Melodien von Franz Schubert S.563/5
No. 6 of Müllerlieder S.565/6
  • No. 14, "Der Jäger"
No. 3 of Müllerlieder S.565/3
  • No. 17, "Die böse Farbe"
No. 4 of Müllerlieder S.565/4
  • No. 18, "Trockne Blumen"
No. 4 of Sechs Melodien von Franz Schubert S.563/4
  • No. 19, "Der Müller und der Bach"
No. 2 of Müllerlieder S.565/2
Rosamunde incidental music (1823) D.797 Transcription: Franz Schuberts geistliche Lieder 1840 S.562/4 Liszt transcribed part of No. 4 Geisterchor as "Hymne"
"Die Gondelfahrer", male chorus and piano (1824) D.809 Op. 28 Transcription 1838 S.559
Divertissement à la hongroise, piano duet (1824) D.818 Op. 54 Mélodies hongroises (d'après Schubert) 1838-39 S.425 1. Andante; 2. Marcia; 3. Allegretto
II. Ungarischer Marsch in C minor used in 4 Marches orchestra 1859-60 S.363/4
piano 4-hands after 1860 S.632/4
Six Grand Marches and Trios, piano duet (1824) D.819 Op. 40 Schubert's Märsche für das Pianoforte Solo piano 1846 S.426/1-2 March in B minor D.819/3 was S.426/2; Trauermarsch in E-flat minor, D.819/5 was S.426/1[45]
Two marches used in 4 Marches orchestra 1859-60 S.363/1-2 March in B minor D.819/3 was S.363/1; Trauermarsch in E-flat minor, D.819/5 was S.363/2[45]
piano 4-hands after 1860 S.632/1-2
"Die Junge Nonne" (1825) D.828 Op. 43/1 6 Songs voice and orchestra 1860 S.375/1
12 Lieder von Franz Schubert piano 1838 S.558/6
"Ave Maria" (1825) D.839 Transcription 1837 S.557d 1st version
12 Lieder von Franz Schubert 1838 S.558/12
"Die Allmacht" (1825) D.852 Op. 79/2 "Die Allmacht" T or S solo, male chorus & orchestra 1871 S.376
"Das Zügenglöcklein" (aka "Das Sterbeglöcklein"; 1826) D.871 No. 3 of Sechs Melodien von Franz Schubert piano 1844 S.563/3
"Lied der Mignon" (1826) D.877/2 Op. 62/2 6 Songs voice and orchestra 1860 S.375/3
"Ständchen (Horch! Horch! die Lerch!)" (1826) D.889 12 Lieder von Franz Schubert piano 1838, rev. 1876 S.558/9
Winterreise, song cycle (1827) D.911 Op. 89 Transcription of 12 songs 1840 S.561 Liszt chose 12 of the 24 songs, and rearranged their order: 1. "Gute Nacht" (S.561/1); 4. "Erstarrung" (S.561/5); 5. "Der Lindenbaum" (S.561/7); 6. "Wasserflut" (S.561/6); 13. "Die Post" (S.561/4); 17. "Im Dorfe" (S.561/12); 18. "Der stürmische Morgen" (S.561/11); 19. "Täuschung" (S.561/9); 21. "Das Wirtshaus" (S.561/10); 22. "Mut!" (S.561/3); 23. "Die Nebensonnen" (S.561/2); and 24. "Der Leiermann" (S.561/8).[1]
Symphony No. 9 in C major (1826) D.944 Projected transcription - - This was planned but never executed.[8]
Schwanengesang, 14 lieder (1828) D.957 Transcription 1838-39 S.560 Liszt rearranged the order of the songs: 1. Liebesbotschaft (S.560/10); 2. "Kriegers Ahnung" (S.560/14); 3. "Frühlingssehnsucht" (S.560/9); 4. "Ständchen" (S.560/7); 5. "Aufenthalt" (S.560/3); 6. "In der Ferne" (S.560/6); 7. "Abschied" (S.560/5); 8. "Der Atlas" (S.560/11); 9. "Ihr Bild" (S.560/8); 10. "Das Fischermädchen" (S.560/2); 11. "Die Stadt" (S.560/1); 12. "Am Meer" (S.560/4); 13. "Der Doppelgänger" (S.560/12); and 14. "Die Taubenpost" (S.560/13).[46]
  • No. 7, "Abschied"
6 Songs voice and orchestra 1860 S.375/6
6 Songs 1860 S.375/5
Reitermarsch, No. 1 of 2 Marches caractéristiques, piano duet (? 1826) D.968b Op. 121 Schubert's Märsche für das Pianoforte Solo piano 1846 S.426/4 [45] D.968b was formerly D.886
Used in 4 Marches orchestra 1859-60 S.363/3 [45]
piano 4-hands after 1860 S.632/3
12 Valses nobles D.969 Soirées de Vienne: 9 Valses caprices d'après Schubert piano 1852 S.427 Used in Nos. 5, 6 and 8[41]

Clara Schumann[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Gedichte aus Rückerts Liebesfrühling, Op. 12 (1841):
  • No. 3, "Warum willst du and're fragen"
Lieder von Robert und Clara Schumann: Book B (Clara) piano 1874 S.569/8-10 The set of 10 transcriptions also includes 7 songs by Robert Schumann
6 Lieder, Op. 13 (1842–44):
  • No. 5, "Ich hab' in deinem Auge"
6 Lieder aus Jucunde von Rollet, Op. 23 (1853):
  • No. 10, "Geheimes Flüstern"

Robert Schumann[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Myrthen, Op. 25 (1840):
  • No. 1, "Widmung"
"Liebeslied" piano 1848 S.566
Lieder und Gesänge, Vol. I, Op. 27 (1840):
  • No. 2, "Dem roten Röslein gleicht mein Lieb"
"Rotes Röslein", No. 2 of 2 Lieder von Robert Schumann 1861 S.567/2
6 Gedichte, Op. 36 (1840):
  • No. 4, "An den Sonnenschein"
No. 1 of 2 Lieder von Robert Schumann 1861 S.567/1
Liederkreis, Op. 39 (1840):
  • No. 12, "Frühlingsnacht"
Transcription 1872 S.568
Liederalbum für die Jugend, 28 songs, Op. 79 (1849):
  • No. 16, "Weihnachtslied"
  • No. 17, "Die wandelnde Glocke"
  • No. 19, "Frühlings Ankunft"
  • No. 22, "Des Sennen Abschied"
  • No. 23, "Er ist's"
Lieder von Robert und Clara Schumann: Book A (Robert) 1874 S.569/1‑7 Nos. 1-5 were from Op. 79, and Nos. 6-7 were from Op. 98a. The set of 10 transcriptions also includes 3 songs by Clara Schumann
Lieder und Gesänge aus 'Wilhelm Meister', 9 songs, Op. 98a (1849):
  • No. 3, "Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt"
  • No. 5, "An die Türen will ich schleichen"
Des Sängers Fluch, 14 songs, Op. 139 (1852):
  • No. 4, "Provenzalisches Minnelied"
Transcription 1881 S.570

Bedřich Smetana[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
3 Polkas de salon, Op. 7, piano (1848–54):
  • No. 1 in F
New introduction and coda piano 1885 S.570a

Mariano Soriano[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
 ? Feuille morte: Élégie d'après Sorriano [sic] piano c. 1845 S.428 Mariano Soriano Fuertes y Piqueras (28 March 1817 - 26 March 1880);[47] Soriano's surname was misspelled as "Sorriano" on the title page.[48] There is no information about the source of this piece or how Liszt came to know it, but it is speculated it may have been a melody from a zarzuela, as it is known Liszt was in Córdoba in 1844. The title Feuille morte is probably Liszt's own.

Louis Spohr[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Zemire et Azor (1819):
  • Zemire's romance "Rose wie bist du reizend und mild!" (Act I, No. 8)
"Die Rose", Romanze piano 1876 S.571

Gaspare Spontini[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Fernand Cortez (La conquête de Mexique) (1809–32)[37] Impromptu brilliant sur des thèmes de Rossini et Spontini piano 1824 S.150 Also includes themes from operas by Gioachino Rossini
Opera Olimpie (1819–26)

Imre Széchényi[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Ungarischer Marsch (? 1872) Einleitung und Ungarischer Marsch
(Bevezetés és magyar indulò)
piano 1872 S.572 Imre Széchényi 1858–1905[1]

Carl Tausig[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Valse-Caprice No. 3, piano (1862) Revised with additions piano 1883-85 S.571a (S.571a was formerly S.167a.)
Tausig's Valse-Caprice No. 3 was based on Johann Strauss II's Wahlstimmen, Op. 250.[1]

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Eugene Onegin, Op. 24 (1879):
  • Polonaise from Act III
Transcription piano 1880 S.429 Dedicated to Karl Klindworth[38]

Pier Adolfo Tirindelli[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Mazurka No. 2 Variations piano 1880 S.754 Probably not by Liszt.[11]

János Végh[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Suite en forme de valse (piano 4-hands; 1882) Valse de concert d'après la "Suite en forme de valse" piano pub. 1889 S.430 János Végh von Vereb (1845–1918) was a close friend of Liszt. He studied with Károly Thern and Mihály Mosonyi but decided to pursue a judicial career while continuing his involvement in music as an amateur. With Liszt's approval he transcribed for 2 pianos 8‑hands several of Liszt's works, such as the Dante Symphony, and the Grand Galop Chromatique.[49] In 1879 Liszt dedicated to Végh his symphonic poem Hunnenschlacht and his transcription for piano 4-hands of that work as well as Hamlet, Die Ideale, and Zwei Episoden aus Lenaus Faust. In 1881 Végh became vice-president of the Budapest Academy of Music, Liszt being the president.[50][51]

Giuseppe Verdi[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera I Lombardi (1843) Salve Maria de Jérusalem piano 1848 S.431
Opera Ernani (1844) Concert paraphrase on Ernani 1847 S.431a These are different works, despite the similarity of the names. S.431a was formerly numbered S.457.[52]
Ernani. Paraphrase de concert by 1849 S.432
Opera Rigoletto (1851) Rigoletto. Paraphrase de concert 1859 S.434
Opera Il trovatore (1853) Miserere de Trovatore 1859 S.433
Opera Simon Boccanegra (1857) Reminiscences de Boccanegra 1882 S.438
Opera Don Carlos (1867) Coro di festa e marcia funebre 1867‑68 S.435
Opera Aida (1871) Danza sacra e duetto final 1871-72 S.436 Dedicated to Toni Raab[53]
Requiem (1874):
  • Agnus Dei
Agnus Dei de la Messe de Requiem piano 1877 S.437
organ or harmonium 1877-83 S.675c

Mikhail Vielgorski[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Mazurka Mazurka pour piano composée par un amateur de St. Pétersbourg, paraphrasée par F. L. piano 1842 S.384 This mazurka was often misattributed to Alexander Alyabyev.[1]
Romance "I Love" (Люблю я) Transcription: 2nd version titled Autrefois 1843 S.577

Note: Vielgorski is also seen as Count Michael Wielhorski.[1]

Richard Wagner[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Opera Rienzi (1840) Phantasiestück über Motive aus Rienzi ("Santo spirito cavaliere") piano 1859 S.439 The Roman War Song "Santo spirito cavaliere" is from the finale of Act III. The work also quotes the Gebet (Prayer) from Act V and the Aufruf zum Kampf (Call to Arms) "Doch horet ihr der Trompete Ruf" from Act I.[54]
Opera The Flying Dutchman (1843) Spinning Chorus 1860 S.440
Ballad pub. 1873 S.441
Opera Tannhäuser (1845) Overtüre zu Tannhäuser: Konzertparaphrase 1848 S.442
"O du mein holder Abendstern" 1849 S.444
cello and piano 1852 S.380
Entry of the Guests piano 1852 S.445/1 Liszt published the Entry of the Guests along with Elsa's Bridal Procession from Lohengrin, as "Two Pieces from Tannhäuser and Lohengrin"
Pilgrims' Chorus: Paraphrase organ 1860 S.676 This paraphrase is not based on the Pilgrims' Chorus from Act III, but on a simplified version of the opening section of the Overture, which uses the same melody, but differs from the Chorus in both structure and key.[54]
piano c.1861 S.443
Opera Lohengrin (1850) Elsa's Bridal Procession 1852 S.445/2 Liszt published Elsa's Bridal Procession along with the Entry of the Guests from Tannhäuser, as "Two Pieces from Tannhäuser and Lohengrin"
1. Festival and Bridal Song
2. Elsa's Dream
3. Lohengrin's Rebuke
1854 S.446
Opera Tristan und Isolde (1859):
  • Isolde's final aria, "Mild und leise"
Isoldens Liebestod 1867 S.447 In his concert version of the Prelude (Overture) and Isolde's Act 3 final aria "Mild und leise", first performed in 1862 (several years before the premiere of the opera in 1865), Wagner called the Prelude the Liebestod (Love-death) while Isolde's final aria "Mild und leise" he called the Verklärung (Transfiguration). Liszt named his transcription of "Mild und leise" Isoldes Liebestod; he prefaced his score with a four-bar motto from the Love Duet from Act II, which in the opera is sung to the words "sehnend verlangter Liebestod". Liszt's transcription became well known throughout Europe well before Wagner's opera reached most places, and the final scene is now always called by the name Liszt gave it, Liebestod.[54]
Opera Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (1867) "Am stillen Herd" 1871 S.448
Opera Das Rheingold (1869) "Valhalla" from Der Ring des Nibelungen c.1876 S.449 Liszt based this on "The Entry of the Gods into Valhalla", the closing scene of Das Rheingold, the opening opera of the Ring. However, as it conforms to no single passage in that scene, it is thus a paraphrase, not strictly a transcription.[54]
Opera Parsifal (1882) Feierlicher Marsch zum heiligen Gral 1882 S.450

Carl Maria von Weber[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Leier und Schwert, six 4-part men's choruses, Op. 42, J.168-173 (1814):
  • No. 2, Lutzows wilde Jagd, J.168
  • No. 3, Gebet vor der Schlacht, J.173
  • No. 6, Schwertlied, J.169
Leier und Schwert – Heroïde piano 1846-47 S.452 An Introduction was followed by Schwertlied, Gebet vor der Schlacht and Lutzows wilde Jagd.[55]
Jubelouvertüre, Op. 59, J.245 (1818) Transcription 1846 S.576
Polacca brillante in E major "L'hilarité", piano, Op. 72, J.268 (1819) Polonaise brillante piano and orchestra c.1851 S.367 Dedicated to Adolf von Henselt. FP of S.367 Weimar, 13 April 1851, Salomon Jadassohn (piano), Liszt (conductor). Liszt also arranged S.367 for piano solo (S.455), which was the solo part with ossias.[44]
piano S.455
Opera Der Freischütz, Op. 77, J.277 (1821) Overture 1846 S.575
Freischütz Fantasy 1840‑41 S.451
Konzertstück in F minor, piano and orchestra, Op. 79, J.282 (1821) Transcription 1868-70 S.576a
piano and orchestra S.367a The piano part appears to be a slightly altered version of S.576a, which is played with Weber's original orchestration.[56]
Preciosa, incidental music, Op. 78, J.279 (1820):
  • "Einsam bin ich, nicht alleine"
Transcription piano 1848 S.453
Partsong Schlummerlied, 4 male voices, Op. 68/4, J.285 (1822) "Schlummerlied mit Arabesken" 1848 S.454
Opera Oberon, J.306 (1826) Overture 1843 S.574

August Heinrich von Weyrauch[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Song "Nach Osten!" (1824) No. 1 of Sechs Melodien von Franz Schubert piano 1846 S.563/1 August Heinrich von Weyrauch, also known as Hans von Weyrauch (1788–1851). The song was reissued in 1843 with new words, a new title "Adieu" (which was translated as "Lebe wohl"), and misattributed to Franz Schubert. Liszt included it with 5 genuine Schubert songs in his collection of 6 transcriptions.[57][58]

Juliusz Zarębski[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Danses galiciennes, piano 4-hands (1880) Orchestration orchestra 1881 S.364 Zarębski was a pupil of Liszt.

Géza Zichy[edit]

Original work Liszt work Forces Date S no. Notes
Valse d'Adèle, piano left‑hand Valse d'Adèle: Transcription brillante à deux mains piano 2-hands pub. 1877 S.456 Count Géza Zichy lost his right arm in a hunting accident at age 15. He later became a pionereering left-hand pianist and composer of works for piano left-hand, including the first known concerto for piano left-hand and orchestra (1902).
Ballad "Der Zaubersee" "Der Zaubersee" voice and orchestra  ? S.377

Index of S. numbers[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am IMSLP: Versions of Works by Others (Liszt, Franz)
  2. ^ a b c d Grove, p. 309
  3. ^ a b Grove, p. 281
  4. ^ a b Grove, p. 311
  5. ^ a b c Grove, p. 294
  6. ^ a b Grove, p. 280
  7. ^ IMSLP: Preludes and Fugues by J.S. Bach, S.462 (Liszt, Franz)
  8. ^ a b c d e f Grove, p. 315
  9. ^ a b c Grove, p. 299
  10. ^ a b Grove, p. 300
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Grove, p. 314
  12. ^ Hyperion Records: Beethovens Lieder (Sechs Lieder von Goethe), S468
  13. ^ a b c Grove, p. 275
  14. ^ a b c d e Grove, p. 295
  15. ^ a b Naxos Direct
  16. ^ a b Grove, p. 286
  17. ^ a b Grove, p. 276
  18. ^ a b Hyperion Records: Franz Liszt, The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 16 – Bunte Reihe
  19. ^ IMSLP: Bunte Reihe, Op.30 (David, Ferdinand)
  20. ^ Grove, p. 301
  21. ^ The Lied, Art Song and Choral Text Archive: Donizetti, song cycle Nuits d'Été à Pausilippe
  22. ^ Michael Saffle, Liszt in Germany, 1840-1845
  23. ^ World Cat
  24. ^ Grove, p. 292
  25. ^ Mária P. Eckhardt, Franz Liszt's Music Manuscripts in the National Széchényi Library, Budapest, p. 196
  26. ^ Grove, pp. 301-2
  27. ^ Grove, p. 302
  28. ^ Septet No.1, Op.74 (Hummel, Johann Nepomuk)
  29. ^ Grove, p. 283, footnote
  30. ^ Grove, Vol. IV, pp. 858-9, KROV, Josef Theodor
  31. ^ Liszt Society Newsletter No. 70, June 1999
  32. ^ Richard and John Contiguglia, Duo-Pianists
  33. ^ Hyperion Records
  34. ^ Cantorion
  35. ^ Hyperion Records: Soirées italiennes – Six amusements sur des motifs de Mercadante, S411
  36. ^ a b c d e f Grove, p. 296
  37. ^ a b c d e Grove, p. 277
  38. ^ a b c d e Grove, p. 297
  39. ^ Hyperion Records
  40. ^ a b Grove, p. 304
  41. ^ a b c d e f IMSLP: Soirées de Vienne, S. 427 (Liszt, Franz)
  42. ^ Grove, p. 278
  43. ^ IMSLP: Apparitions, S. 155 (Liszt, Franz)
  44. ^ a b Grove, p. 293
  45. ^ a b c d Mária P. Eckhardt, Franz Liszt's Music Manuscripts in the National Széchényi Library, Budapest, p. 146
  46. ^ Grove, p. 305
  47. ^ Hyperion Records
  48. ^ Hyperion Records
  49. ^ Music Web International
  50. ^ Maria P. Eckardt, Franz Liszt's Music Manuscripts in the National Széchényi Library, Budapest, p. 194
  51. ^ Hyperion Records
  52. ^ Grove, p. 299, footnote
  53. ^ Grove, p. 298
  54. ^ a b c d Charles Suttoni, Introduction, Franz Liszt: Complete Piano Transcriptions from Wagner's Operas, Dover Publications
  55. ^ Hyperion Records
  56. ^ Hyperion Records
  57. ^ Hyperion Records
  58. ^ The Lied, Art Song and Choral Text Archive

Sources[edit]