Fred Anton

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Not to be confused with Fred Anton Maier.
Frederick Anton III
Born 1934 (age 79–80)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Alma mater Villanova University School of Law

Frederick Anton III is President and CEO of the Pennsylvania Manufactures Association and the Pennsylvania Manufactures Insurance Company.

A native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he graduated from Villanova University School of Law in 1958 and practiced law in Philadelphia.[1] In 1962, he took a job as a claims attorney with the Pennsylvania Manufactures Insurance Company, where he handled workers compensation cases.[1] He became president of the Pennsylvania Manufactures Insurance Company in 1972 and became president of the Pennsylvania Manufactures Association in 1975.[1]

As a Republican, he was a delegate to the 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008 Republican National Conventions.[2]

The Pennsylvania Report named him to the 2003 "The Pennsylvania Report Power 75" list of influential figures in Pennsylvania politics, calling him "an important financial player for GOP" (Republican Party)[3] In 2009, the Pennsylvania Report named him to the "The Pennsylvania Report 100" list of influential figures in Pennsylvania politics and noted that he remains a "key figure in the business community" and "[t]he “godfather” of all conservative organizations in the state."[4] He was named to the PoliticsPA list of "Sy Snyder's Power 50" list of influential individuals in Pennsylvania politics in 2002.[5] In 2010, he was named of the "Top 10 Republicans" in Pennsylvania by Politics Magazine, who noted that he "funds much of the conservative infrastructure in the state, such as the right of-center think-tank Commonwealth Foundation."[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bill Bova and Fred Anton (2007). PCN Profiles: Fred Anton (Television interview). Pennsylvania Cable Network. 
  2. ^ Kestenbaum, Lawrence (March 24, 2009). "Index to Politicians: Antilla to Aoelua". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 2009-09-12. 
  3. ^ "The PA Report "Power 75" List" (PDF). Pennsylvania Report. Capital Growth, Inc. January 31, 2003. Archived from the original on 2006-09-02. 
  4. ^ "PA Report 100" (PDF). Pennsylvania Report. Capital Growth, Inc. January 23, 2009. Archived from the original on 2009-08-14. 
  5. ^ "Sy Snyder's Power 50". PoliticsPA. The Publius Group. 2002. Archived from the original on 2002-04-21. 
  6. ^ Roarty, Alex; Sean Coit (January 2010). "Pennsylvania Influencers". Politics Magazine. pp. 44–49. Archived from the original on 2010-02-07. 

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