Fred Feldkamp

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Fred J. Feldkamp (March 2, 1914 – December 7, 1981) was an American writer, editor, and film producer. He was married to Phyllis Dubsky Feldkamp, an esteemed fashion writer from the 1940s to early 1990s.

Career[edit]

Feldkamp was born on March 2, 1914 in Newark, New Jersey.[1] He served in World War II as a correspondent with the Marine Corps in the Pacific.[1] After the war Feldkamp became a producer of his own films, an editor of the American magazine Life, and a writer for the newsreel "The March of Time."[1] Feldkamp died in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania at the age of 67.[1]

Films produced[edit]

In 1949, Feldkamp adapted General Dwight D. Eisenhower's book Crusade in Europe for a 26-part television series which featured actual film footage of World War II and won the Peabody Award.[1] Additionally, he wrote for another 26-part television series called Crusade in the Pacific which premiered in 1951.[2] He also independently produced three movies, Operation Manhunt (1954), The Silken Affair (1956), and Triple Cross (1966).[2]

Books edited[edit]

Feldkamp served as a friend and literary editor to American humorist Will Cuppy and worked extensively on many of the author's satirical history novels.[3] After Cuppy died in 1949, both Feldkamp and his wife Phyllis [4] sorted through thousands of his close friend's files and notes to finish writing The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody, a piece of historical satire that the writer had been working on for many years.[3] Due to Feldkamp's dedication and hard work, the book was published in 1950, less than a year after Cuppy's death.[3] For his deceased friend, he edited another posthumous volume, a comic almanac titled How to Get from January to December, that appeared in 1951.[5]

Books written[edit]

Feldkamp wrote two books about travel. The first, written in 1972, is titled, "The Good Life or What's Left of It (1972) and was co-authored by his wife Phyllis Feldkamp, a prominent figure in the fashion-writing world from Philly to Paris. This book details the pleasures and enjoyment of life in France.[6] ISBN 978-0-06-122480-5[6] The second book, *Not Everybody's Europe, written in 1976, provides descriptions and illustrations of Europe, all helpful for traveling the continent.[7] ISBN 978-0-06-122481-2[7]

Articles written[edit]

Feldkamp contributed several articles to the magazine The New Yorker. These include:

  • "Benny" (March 11, 1933) [8]
  • "Relative" with Russell Maloney (October 2, 1937) [8]
  • "The Comment" with E.B. White (August 11, 1939) [8]
  • "MIXTURE FOR MEN: A Collection of Fact and Humor by Some of the Best Writers of Short Pieces in Our Time" (1947)[8]
  • "The Talk of the Town" with St. Clair McKelway (January 11, 1958)[8]
  • "Cite du Cheval" (June 6, 1970)[8]
  • "Deauville" (August 14, 1971)[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e The New York Times (New York, NY) Obituary of Fred Feldkamp. December 8, 1981, http://www.nytimes.com.
  2. ^ a b "Fred Feldkamp."IMBD, 2011. http://www.imbd.com.
  3. ^ a b c Feldkamp, Fred J., ed."Introduction." In Cuppy, The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody, VII-X. Boston: Henry Holt and Company, 1950.
  4. ^ http://dla.library.upenn.edu/dla/pacscl/ead.pdf?id=PACSCL_BMC_USPBmBMCM89
  5. ^ Feldkamp, Fred J., ed. "Introduction." In Cuppy, How to Get from January to December, VI-X. Boston: Henry Holt and Company, 1951.
  6. ^ a b Feldkamp, Fred and Phyllis Feldkamp, The Good Life or What's Left of It. Indianapolis: Harper's Magazine Press, 1972.
  7. ^ a b Feldkamp, Fred, Not Everybody's Europe. Indianapolis: Harper's Magazine Press, 1976.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g "Archive Results for Fred Feldkamp." The New Yorker, http://www.newyorker.com.