Fred Hampton, Jr.

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Fred Hampton, Jr.
Born (1969-12-29) December 29, 1969 (age 44)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Ethnicity African-American
Citizenship United States
Occupation Activist
Years active 1988–present
Known for Prisoners of Conscience Committee
(Chairman)
Relatives Father: Fred Hampton

Fred Hampton, Jr. (born December 29, 1969) is an African-American political activist and the son of Fred Hampton, Sr. His father was a Black Panther who was killed by the Chicago Police in 1969. Hampton's mother Deborah Johnson, who was also shot, was eight-and-a-half months pregnant with him when Hampton Sr. was killed in her presence during the pre-dawn police raid. Hampton Sr. was 21 at the time of his death; Johnson was 19.

Biography[edit]

Hampton became the president of the International People's Democratic Uhuru Movement in 1990.

1993 Conviciton[edit]

In 1993, he was convicted of aggravated arson. The case involved the firebombing of a Korean grocery store in the aftermath of the 1992 nationwide protests after the acquittal of the Los Angeles Police Department officers who beat Rodney King. Hampton was sentenced to eighteen years in prison, and was paroled on September 14, 2001.

Prisoners of Conscience Committee[edit]

Hampton is the chairman of the Prisoners of Conscience Committee (P.O.C.C.). On July 3, 2013, Hampton and three others filed a false arrest and excessive force lawsuit against Oakland and Emeryville, claiming that they were held for almost three hours on January 21, 2013 in retaliation for their well-known activism.[1]

Pop Culture[edit]

Hampton made an appearance in Michel Gondry's 2006 film Dave Chappelle's Block Party. His trial forms the basis of Fall Out Boy's song "You're Crashing, But You're No Wave". He is also mentioned in Dead Prez's 2000 song "Behind Enemy Lines".

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tim Phillips, "Fred Hampton Jr. and Three Other Activists Sue Oakland and Emeryville Over Police Misconduct", Activist Defense, July 8, 2013.

External links[edit]