Fred Salle

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Fred Salle
Medal record
Men's athletics
Commonwealth Games
Silver 1986 Edinburgh Long jump

Frédéric Ebong-Salle,[1] better known as Fred Salle (born 10 September 1964) is a retired athlete who specialized in the long jump. He represented Great Britain for most of his career, except for a period in the late 1980s and early 1990s when he represented Cameroon. His personal best jump of 8.10 metres was achieved at the 1994 IAAF World Cup, which he won; he also won the silver medal at the 1986 Commonwealth Games representing England.

Cameroon[edit]

Starting in the 1986–87 indoor season, Salle opted to represent Cameroon.[2] He competed in a high jump meeting in December 1986, jumping a personal best of 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m). His best jump while representing England had been 2.13 metres, achieved in May 1985 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.[2]

Salle competed internationally for his new country, starting at the 1987 World Championships, though he did not reach the final round.[3] At the 1987 Central African Games, he won the gold medals in both long and high jump,[4] and at the 1988 African Championships, he won the silver medal in the long jump—behind Yusuf Alli—and the bronze medal in the high jump.[5] He then competed at the 1988 Olympic Games, but 7.65 metres in the qualifying round was not enough to reach the final.[1] At the 1989 World Indoor Championships he only managed 7.31 metres, ending in last place of the qualifying round.[6] At the 1991 World Indoor Championships, he ended third to last with 7.11 metres.[7] He won a silver medal as a guest competitor at the AAA Indoor Championships of 1990.[8]

Back to England[edit]

By 1992 he returned to representing Great Britain in competitions.[9] He competed at the World Championships in 1993 and 1995 as well as the 1995 World Indoor Championships without reaching the final.[3] However, he won the 1994 IAAF World Cup competition in London with a jump of 8.10 metres.[10] This was Salle's personal best jump. He did have one wind-assisted 8.10 result in the same year, achieved in July in Gateshead.[2]

In domestic competitions, he won several medals. At the UK Championships, he won a bronze medal in 1992 and a silver in 1993.[9] At the AAA Championships, he won gold medals in 1993 and 1995 and a silver in 1994.[11] At the AAA Championships, he won the bronze medal in 1993, behind two Swedish guests.[8]

The Present[edit]

After working at many different ICT firms, Fred Salle had turned his passion to teaching at St Paul's Catholic College (Burgess Hill), inspiring many young people to achieve through telling them of his own experiences. However, as of Summer 2011 - Fred Salle has decided to go back to the industry to do more ICT consultancy work as he had now realised that it was the lifestyle that he preferred.

Salle.co.uk[edit]

http://www.salle.co.uk is Fred Salle's personal website, a new version is currently under development. His current website is http://www.aimbeyond.co.uk

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Frédéric Ebong-Salle". Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 20 March 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c "UK All-Time Lists: Men – Jumps". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 20 March 2009. 
  3. ^ a b Fred Salle profile at IAAF. Retrieved on 20 March 2009.
  4. ^ "Central African Games and Championships". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 20 March 2009. 
  5. ^ "African Championships". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 20 March 2009. 
  6. ^ "1989 World Indoor Championships, men's long jump qualification". Die Leichtatletik-Statistik-Seite. Retrieved 20 March 2009. 
  7. ^ "1991 World Indoor Championships, men's long jump qualification". Die Leichtatletik-Statistik-Seite. Retrieved 20 March 2009. 
  8. ^ a b "AAA Indoor Championships (Men)". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 20 March 2009. 
  9. ^ a b "UK Championships". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 20 March 2009. 
  10. ^ "British Placings in IAAF World Cup in Athletics". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 20 March 2009. 
  11. ^ "AAA Championships (Men)". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 20 March 2009.