Fred Savage

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Fred Savage
FredSavage1989.jpg
Savage in 1989
Born Fredrick Aaron Savage
(1976-07-09) July 9, 1976 (age 37)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Alma mater Stanford University
Occupation Actor, television director, television producer
Years active 1986–present
Spouse(s) Jennifer Lynn Stone (m. 2004)
Children 3
Awards See Awards

Fredrick Aaron "Fred" Savage (born July 9, 1976)[1] is an American actor, director and producer of television and film.[2] He is best known for his role as Kevin Arnold in the American television series The Wonder Years and as the grandson in The Princess Bride. For his successes, Savage has earned several awards and nominations such as citations from the People's Choice Awards and the Young Artist Awards.

Early life[edit]

Savage was born in Chicago, the son of Joanne and Lewis Savage, who was an industrial real estate broker and consultant.[1] His brother is actor Ben Savage, and his sister is actress/musician Kala Savage. His grandparents were Jewish immigrants from Poland, Ukraine, Germany, and Latvia.[3]

Acting career[edit]

Savage's first screen performance was in the television show Morningstar/Eveningstar, at age 9. He then appeared onscreen in The Boy Who Could Fly, Dinosaurs!, and several television shows, including The Twilight Zone and Crime Story before gaining national attention as the grandson in the 1987 film The Princess Bride opposite Peter Falk.

In 1988, Savage appeared as Kevin Arnold on The Wonder Years, the role for which he is best known, and for which he received two Golden Globe nominations and two Emmy[4] nominations for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. At the age of thirteen he was the youngest actor ever to receive these honors. He remained on the show until it ended in 1993. During this period, he appeared in several films, most notably Vice Versa (1988), and also starred in Little Monsters. After The Wonder Years, Savage primarily did guest and supporting roles, such as the show Boy Meets World (which starred his brother Ben) and in the film Austin Powers in Goldmember as Number Three.

He has lent his voice to several animated projects, including Family Guy, Kim Possible, Justice League Unlimited, Oswald, and Holidaze: The Christmas That Almost Didn't Happen. His two lead roles since The Wonder Years were on the short-lived sitcoms Working and Crumbs.

Savage appeared as a serial rapist on a 2003 episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit and as a womanizing professor on Boy Meets World. He ranked at #27 on VH1's 100 Greatest Kid Stars.

In July 2008, Savage guest-starred in the web series The Rascal on Crackle.[5]

Behind-the-scenes career[edit]

In 1999, Savage began his directing career in which he helmed episodes of over a dozen television series. His credits include Boy Meets World, Drake & Josh and Ned's Declassified for Nickelodeon, as well as That's So Raven, Hannah Montana and Wizards of Waverly Place for Disney Channel.

Besides directing several episodes, Savage co-produced the Disney Channel Original Series Phil of the Future. In 2007, he was nominated for a Directors Guild award for the Phil episode "Not-So-Great-Great Grandpa".

He has served as a producer for several episodes of It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Friends with Benefits, Party Down, Phil of the Future, and Happy Endings.

In 2007, he made his feature film directing debut with the film Daddy Day Camp.

Personal life[edit]

He is married to his childhood friend, Jennifer Lynn Stone. They have three children: two sons and a daughter.[6]

Filmography[edit]

Films[edit]

Television[edit]

Directing credits[edit]

Awards[edit]

Directors Guild of America[edit]

Year Result Category
2006 Nominated Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Children's Programs for: Phil of the Future (episode "Not So Great Great Great Grandpa")
2007 Nominated Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Children's Programs for: Wizards of Waverly Place (episode "The Crazy 10 Minute Sale")
2009 Nominated Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Children's Programs for: Zeke and Luther (pilot episode)

Emmy Award[edit]

Year Result Category
1989 Nominated Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series for: The Wonder Years
1990 Nominated Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series for: The Wonder Years

Golden Globe Award[edit]

Year Result Category
1989 Nominated Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical for: The Wonder Years
1990 Nominated Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical for The Wonder Years

People's Choice Awards[edit]

Year Result Category
1989 Won Favorite Young TV Performer for: The Wonder Years
1990 Won Favorite Young TV Performer for: The Wonder Years

Saturn Award[edit]

Year Result Category
1988 Won Best Performance by a Younger Actor for: Vice Versa

Young Artist Awards[edit]

Year Result Category
1986 Won Exceptional Performance by a Young Actor, Supporting Role, Feature Film - Comedy, Fantasy or Drama for: The Boy Who Could Fly
1987 Won Best Young Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama for: The Princess Bride
1988 Won Best Young Actor Starring in a Television Comedy Series for: The Wonder Years
1989 Nominated Best Young Actor Starring in a Motion Picture for: The Wizard
1989 Won Best Young Actor Starring in a Television Series for: The Wonder Years

Golden Raspberry Award[edit]

Year Result Category
2008 Nominated Worst Director for: Daddy Day Camp

Viewers for Quality Television "Q" Awards[edit]

Year Result Category
1989 Won Best Actor in a Quality Comedy Series for: The Wonder Years
1990 Won Best Actor in a Quality Comedy Series for: The Wonder Years

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Fred Savage Biography (1976-)". Filmreference.com. Retrieved 2013-03-22. 
  2. ^ Lee, Felicia R. (2006-01-19). "A Sitcom 70's Child Grows Up to Be an Alter Ego". New York Times. Retrieved 2010-08-11. 
  3. ^ Shirley, Don (2001-12-16). "LA Times: Theater; Not Just Acting Like an Adult; Fred Savage contemplates his roots – as a performer and a Jew – for 'Last Night of Ballyhoo". Articles.latimes.com. Retrieved 2013-03-22. 
  4. ^ "Fred Savage Emmy Nominated". Emmys.com. Retrieved 2013-03-22. 
  5. ^ "International Espionage and Comedy with ‘The Rascal’". Tilzy.TV. 2008-08-12. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  6. ^ White, Nicholas (January 28, 2008). "Fred Savage & Wife Expecting Second Child". People. Retrieved January 3, 2012. 

External links[edit]