Fred W. Hammond

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Fred W. Hammond (1902)

Fred W. Hammond (July 21, 1872 – January 7, 1942) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.

Life[edit]

He was born on July 21, 1872, in Canastota, Madison County, New York, the son of Henry Clay Hammond (1844–1918) and Amorette A. (Brown) Hammond (1846–1939). The family removed to Utica where he attended the graded schools. In 1885, the family removed to Syracuse. There he attended grammar school, and graduated from Syracuse High School in 1891. Then he attended business college, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1894, and practiced in Syracuse. He was a member of the Board of Supervisors of Onandaga County (Syracuse, 13th Ward) from 1897 to 1900.[1]

Hammond was a member of the New York State Assembly in 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909 and 1911;[2] and was Chairman of the Committee on Revision in 1903, and Chairman of the Committee on Affairs of Cities in 1908 and 1909.

He was Clerk of the New York State Assembly in 1912, and from 1914 to 1934, officiating in the 135th, 137th, 138th, 139th, 140th, 141st, 142nd, 143rd, 144th, 145th, 146th, 147th, 148th, 149th, 150th, 151st, 152nd, 153rd, 154th, 155th, 156th and 157th New York State Legislatures. At the beginning of the 157th Session, the Republican Party was split, and no Clerk could be elected. On January 12, Speaker Joseph A. McGinnies appointed Hammond without election.[3] At the end of this term, Hammond retired, citing health problems.[4]

He died on January 7, 1942, at his home in Syracuse, New York; and was buried at the Oakwood Cemetery there.[5]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ The New York Red Book by Edgar L. Murlin (1903; pg. 138f)
  2. ^ Official New York from Cleveland to Hughes by Charles Elliott Fitch (Hurd Publishing Co., New York and Buffalo, 1911, Vol. IV; pg. 344, 346f, 349, 351f, 354, 356f and 360)
  3. ^ HAMMOND IS NAMED CLERK BY SPEAKER UNDER LEGAL RULING in the New York Times on January 13, 1934 (subscription required)
  4. ^ HAMMOND TO QUIT AT END OF HIS TERM in the New York Times on July 19, 1934 (subscription required)
  5. ^ FRED W. HAMMOND, EX-ASSEMBLYMAN in the New York Times on January 9, 1942 (subscription required)

External links[edit]

New York Assembly
Preceded by
John T. Delaney
New York State Assembly
Onondaga County, 4th District

1901–1906
Succeeded by
district abolished
Preceded by
Edward Schoeneck
New York State Assembly
Onondaga County, 2nd District

1907–1909
Succeeded by
John T. Roberts
Preceded by
John T. Roberts
New York State Assembly
Onondaga County, 2nd District

1911
Succeeded by
David L. Edwards