Fredegond Shove

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Fredegond Shove, photographed by Lady Ottoline Morrell.

Fredegond Shove (/ˈfrɛdɪɡɒnd ˈʃvv/ FRED-igond-SHOHV)[1] (née Maitland, 1889–1949) was an English poet.

Fredegond was the daughter of the legal historian Frederic William Maitland and his wife Florence Henrietta Fisher. She married the economist Gerald Shove, a Cambridge Apostle.

Her work was included in the 1918–19 Georgian poetry volume. She was the first of only two women to be included in that series, the second (in the 1920-22 volume) being Vita Sackville-West. Socially Fredegond was on the fringe of the Bloomsbury group,[2] but mostly resident in Cambridge.

Her poems "Motion and Stillness", "Four Nights", "The New Ghost", and "The Water Mill" were set to music by Ralph Vaughan Williams in Four Poems by Fredegond Shove for baritone and piano (1922). Vaughan Williams' wife Adeline Fisher was Fredegond's aunt.

She continued to write poetry throughout her life. After her death, her sister Ermengard had a small book privately issued, Fredegond and Gerald Shove (1954) containing the poet's brief memoirs of her early years and married life. The introduction to this volume quoted several of the author's poems, which led to a small selection being issued by Cambridge University Press in 1956.

She is buried at the Parish of the Ascension Burial Ground in Cambridge, where her mother and step-father Sir Francis Darwin are also buried.

Her sister Ermengard, in the foreword to the 1956 selection,[3] suggests "one can trace the putting off of Bloomsbury, the putting on of Catholicism, the growing ardour of her love for animals, her deepening fears".

Bibliography[edit]

  • Dreams and Journeys (1918)
  • Daybreak (1922)
  • Christina Rossetti: A Study (1931), ISBN 0-8414-7536-9
  • Fredegond and Gerald Shove (1954)
  • Poems by Fredegond Shove (a selection of 32 poems and extracts) (1956)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ G. M. Miller, BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names (Oxford University Press, 1971), p. 135.
  2. ^ Noel Annan, Leslie Stephen (1984), note p. 159.
  3. ^ Ermengard Maitland, 'Poems by Fredegond Shove' (1956), p. viii.

External links[edit]