Frederick Chien

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Fredrick Chien
錢復
T2009PressConference 20080225 Fredrick Chien.jpg
Fredrick Chien during a 2009 press conference for the Deaflympics
President of Control Yuan
In office
1 February 1999 – 1 February 2005
Preceded by Wang Tso-yung
Succeeded by Wang Chien-shien
Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of China
In office
1 June 1990 – 10 June 1996
Preceded by Lien Chan
Succeeded by John Chiang
Personal details
Born 17 February 1935 (1935-02-17) (age 79)
Hangzhou, Chekiang, China
Nationality  Republic of China
Political party Naval Jack of the Republic of China.svg Kuomintang
Relations Shu Chien (brother)
Chien Shih-Liang (father)
Carl Chien(son)
Alma mater National Taiwan University
Yale University
Profession Diplomat and politician

Fredrick Chien (Chinese: 錢復; pinyin: Qián Fù; born 17 February 1935), also spelled Fredrick Chien Foo, was the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of China on Taiwan from 1990 to 1996.[1]

Background[edit]

Chien is known as one of the "four princes of Taiwan" along with Chen Li-an, Lien Chan, and Shen Chun-shan, all of whose fathers attained prominence in politics prior to their sons' successes.[2] He attended National Taiwan University as an undergraduate, graduating in 1956. He went on to Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, where he earned his M.A. (1959) and Ph.D. (1962) in international relations.[1] He wrote his thesis on Qing Dynasty China's diplomacy in Joseon Dynasty Korea during the opening of Korea, focusing on the period between the Japan-Korea Treaty of 1876 until the 1885 Convention of Tientsin.[3]

Works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 《中華民國監察院院長錢復先生》 [Republic of China Control Yuan President Fredrick Chien], Republic of China: Government Information Office, 2003, retrieved 2009-11-04 
  2. ^ Liu, Lingbin (2007-04-19), 台湾"四大公子"的人生传奇/The legendary lives of Taiwan's "Four Princes", United Daily News (in Chinese), retrieved 2008-01-05 
  3. ^ Baker, Hugh D. R. (1969), Review — Fredrick Foo Chien: The opening of Korea ..., Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 32 (2): 461–462, doi:10.1017/S0041977X00056081