Frederick Gordon-Lennox, 9th Duke of Richmond

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The Duke of Richmond
9th Duke of Richmond & Gordon 4th Duke of Lennox Allan Warren.jpg
Portrait by Allan Warren
Born (1904-02-05)5 February 1904
Died 2 November 1989(1989-11-02) (aged 85)
Title Duke of Richmond
Tenure 7 May 1935 – 2 November 1989
Other titles 9th Duke of Lennox
9th Duke of Aubigny (France)
4th Duke of Gordon
9th Earl of March
9th Earl of Darnley
4th Earl of Kinrara
9th Baron Settrington
9th Lord Torbolton
Hereditary Constable of Inverness Castle
Successor Charles Gordon-Lennox, 10th Duke
Spouse(s) Elizabeth Grace Hudson
Issue Charles Henry Gordon-Lennox
Nicholas Charles Gordon-Lennox
Parents Charles Gordon-Lennox, 8th Duke of Richmond
Hilda Madeline Brassey

Frederick Charles Gordon-Lennox, 9th Duke of Richmond, 9th Duke of Lennox, 9th Duke of Aubigny (French noble title) and 4th Duke of Gordon (5 February 1904 – 2 November 1989) was a British peer, engineer, racing driver and motor racing promoter.

Freddie Richmond, as he was known, was the son of Charles Gordon-Lennox, 8th Duke of Richmond. He was educated at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford. His interest in engineering started while he was at university and afterwards he was apprenticed to Bentley Motors. He began a motor racing career in 1929 when he took part in the JCC High Speed Trial. In the next year he became a member of the Austin team and won the Brooklands 500 Miles. He created his own team of MG Midgets in 1931 and won the Brooklands Double Twelve race, but then became more involved in the organisational side of motor sport.

He inherited the Dukedoms in 1935, along with the Goodwood Estate and the racecourse. Death duties meant he had to sell the family interests in Scotland, including Gordon Castle, and settle on the Goodwood Estate near Chichester. He designed and flew his own aircraft and served with the Royal Air Force during World War II. For a time he was based in Washington, working for the Ministry of Aircraft Production.

After the war he faced the task of rehabilitating Goodwood, and saw the potential for creating a motor racing circuit from the fighter station built at Goodwood during the Second World War. Horse racing was an important part of the Goodwood scene, but he did not share his ancestors' interest in the sport. The Goodwood Circuit became an important venue in motor racing. However, by 1966 the Duke was concerned at the increasing risks involved in motor racing and closed the circuit except for minor club activities and private testing.

The Duke was the longest-serving Vice President of the Royal Automobile Club, with which he was associated since 1948. As early as the thirties, he was the motoring correspondent of the Sunday Referee, and became the Founder President of the Guild of Motoring Writers.

The Duke appeared on the 14 December 1958 episode of the American version of What's My Line?.[1]

Marriage and children[edit]

He married Elizabeth Grace Hudson on 15 December 1927. She was the daughter of Rev. Thomas William Hudson and his wife Alethea Matheson, and sister of Bishop Noel Hudson. They were married for sixty-one years and had two children:

Ancestry[edit]

References[edit]

  • Times Obituary, November 1989
  1. ^ http://www.tv.com/whats-my-line/episode-444/episode/96038/summary.html?tag=ep_guide;ep_title;14

External links[edit]

Peerage of England
Preceded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Duke of Richmond
3rd creation
1935–1989
Succeeded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Duke of Lennox
2nd creation
1935–1989
Succeeded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox
Duke of Gordon
2nd creation
1935–1989
Succeeded by
Charles Gordon-Lennox