Frederick L. Barry

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For other people named Frederick Barry, see Frederick Barry (disambiguation).

The Right Reverend Frederick Lehrle Barry (1897–1960)[1] was the fourth Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Albany in the United States from 1950 to 1960, during which he re-built a diocese.

Early life[edit]

Barry was ordained a priest in 1925.[2] He was a curate at St. Paul's, Flatbush.[2] He served as rector at St. Gabriel's, Hollis, St. John's, Bridgeport, Connecticut, and St. Luke's, Evanston, Illinois.[2] He was a bachelor his entire life.[2]

Work as Bishop[edit]

"On May 2, 1945, ... Barry was elected Bishop Coadjutor of Albany."[2] He was consecrated, in a "magnificent demonstration,"[2] at the Cathedral of All Saints by Presiding Bishop Most Reverend Henry St. George Tucker, incumbent Albany Bishop George Ashton Oldham, and "Bishop Stires, retired Bishop of Long Island, who had ordained Frederick Barry to the priesthood."[2] Upon Bishop Oldham's retirement, Bishop Barry was "enthroned" in the cathedra in the Cathedral of All Saints on January 25, 1950.[2]

Bishop Barry travelled widely though the 19-county diocese to confirm parishioners, to ordain priests, and to preach.[3][4][5][6] He specifically "was assigned jurisdiction over the missionary work of the Diocese."[2] He founded "the Adirondack Mission... [f]or more than forty years, a team of clergy" to service the spiritual needs of several small parishes in the Adirondack Mountains area.[3] He was an active leader in the Episcopal church.[2][7]

In May 1950, at the end of a stormy Diocesan convention held at the Lake Placid Club, he nominated David E. Richards, then a priest at St. George's Church, Schenectady, who was elected his first suffragan bishop.[2] Richards served until 1957, when he was elected to be the Missionary Bishop of Central America.[2]

He asked for a replacement, and the Very Rev. Allen W. Brown, then Dean of the Cathedral of All Saints, was elected Suffragan Bishop of Albany in October 1958,[8] over Charles Bowen Persell, Jr., his only close competitor.[2][9] Brown was consecrated on February 22, 1959, at St. John's Church, Ogdensburg, by Presiding Bishop the Most Reverend Arthur C. Lichtenberger.[2] In 1960, Bishop Barry died in a hospital after some time in ill health, and the see was left vacant.[2][9] Brown was elected and consecrated bishop in 1961 to replace Barry.[9] Barry is buried in the Lady Chapel of the Cathedral of All Saints.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sarcophagus of Frederick Lehrle Barry, Lady chapel, Cathedral of All Saints.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o George E. DeMille, Project Canterbury: The Episcopate of Frederick Barry (Albany: Diocesan Book Store, 1962), found at Anglican History website page on DeMille, 1962. Retrieved January 9, 2009.
  3. ^ a b Full Homely Divinity website. Retrieved January 9, 2009.
  4. ^ "Greene Assigned To Fort Edward Church," Alumni News, A Publication of Indiana Central College, October 4, 1958, found at University of Indiana archives. Retrieved January 9, 2009.
  5. ^ "TO HOLD LENTEN SERVICE TONIGHT: Albany Episcopal Bishop Coadjutor to Preach at Christ Church," Oswego Palladium Times, February 27, 1947, found at Fulton History website Oswego pages. Retrieved January 9, 2009.
  6. ^ "IMPRESSIVE RITES MARK ORDINATION AT CHERRY VALLEY", Richfield Springs (N.Y.) Mercury, July 31, 1947, found at Fulton History website Richfield Springs pages. Retrieved January 9, 2009.
  7. ^ Year Book Of American Churches For 1956, found at Yearbook Archives website. Retrieved January 9, 2009.
  8. ^ "Allen W. Brown, Bishop, 81," New York Times, January 24, 1990, found at [1]. Retrieved January 9, 2009.
  9. ^ a b c Albany Episcopal Disocese website History page. Retrieved January 9, 2009.

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

Episcopal Church (USA) titles
Preceded by
George Ashton Oldham
4th Bishop of Albany
1950 – 1960
Succeeded by
Allen W. Brown