Frederick Mayes

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Major General
Frederick Mayes
CB FRCS
Born (1934-08-24) 24 August 1934 (age 80)
Allegiance  United Kingdom
Service/branch  British Army
Years of service 1960 – 1996
Rank Major General
Service number 464204
Commands held Director General Army Medical Services
Awards Commander of the Venerable Order of Saint John (CStJ)
Companion of the Order of the Bath (CB)

Major General Frederick Brian Mayes, CB, FRCS (born 24 August 1934) is a retired senior British Army officer. He was Director General of the Army Medical Services from 1993 to 1996.

Early life[edit]

Mayes was born on 24 August 1934 to Harry Frederick Mayes and Constance Enid Mayes.[1] He was educated at Wyggeston Grammar School, Leicester from 1945 to 1952. He studied at St Mary's Hospital Medical School, graduating with a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MB BS) in 1958.[1]

Military career[edit]

On 1 February 1960, as part of National Service, Mayers was commissioned into Royal Army Medical Corps as a lieutenant. He was given the service number 464204.[2] On 9 March 1960, he transferred to a short service commission in the regular army. He maintained the rank of lieutenant and was given seniority from 14 December 1959.[3] He was promoted to captain on 14 December 1960.[4] He transferred to a regular commission on 4 March 1964, with seniority in the rank of captain from 14 December 1959.[5] He was promoted to major on 14 December 1964.[6] During his early career, he served in Aden, most likely during the Aden Emergency of 1963 to 1967, in East Africa, in West Germany with the British Army of the Rhine and in the United Kingdom.[1]

On 14 December 1972, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel.[7] In the same year, he was made a Consultant in Surgery.[1] He was promoted to colonel on 14 December 1982.[8] From 1984 to 1987, he was Commanding Officer of the British Military Hospital in Hannover. From 1987 to 1988, he was Commanding Officer of Cambridge Military Hospital, Aldershot Garrison.[1] He was promoted to brigadier on 19 December 1988.[9] He was then once more posted to West Germany as a Consultant Surgeon attached to HQ BAOR in 1988.[1] He was promoted to major general on 31 December 1990.[10] He was Commander Medical, HQ BAOR from 1990 to 1993. He served as Director General Army Medical Services from 1993 to 1996.[1]

He retired from the British Army on 26 May 1996.[11]

Later life[edit]

In retirement, Mayes lives in the town of Farnham, Surrey.[1]

Personal life[edit]

In 1962, Mayes married Mary Anna Georgina Roche. Together they had two sons and two daughters. One of their two sons pre-deceased his parents.[1]

Honours and decorations[edit]

On 31 December 1990, Mayes was appointed Honorary Surgeon to the Queen (QHS).[10] His tenure expired on 1 April 1996.[12] He was appointed Commander of the Venerable Order of Saint John (CStJ) in December 1993.[13] In the 1995 Queen's Birthday Honours, he was appointed Companion of the Order of the Bath (CB).[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "MAYES, Maj.-Gen. Frederick Brian". Who's Who 2012. A & C Black. December 2011. 
  2. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 41962. p. 1384. 19 February 1960. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  3. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 41997. p. 2363. 29 March 1960. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  4. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 42219. p. 8625. 13 December 1960. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  5. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 43362. p. 5458. 19 June 1964. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  6. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 43514. p. 10652. 11 December 1964. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  7. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 45853. p. 15058. 19 December 1972. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  8. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 49237. p. 749. 17 January 1983. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  9. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 51564. p. 14244. 19 December 1988. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  10. ^ a b The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 52427. p. 1044. 21 January 1991. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  11. ^ The London Gazette: no. 54408. p. 7305. 28 May 1996. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  12. ^ The London Gazette: no. 54378. p. 5714. 22 April 1996. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  13. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 53513. p. 19802. 14 December 1993. Retrieved 2012-10-19.
  14. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 54066. p. 2. 16 June 1995. Retrieved 2012-10-19.