Frederick Walker Mott

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Frederick Walker Mott.jpg
Frederick Walker Mott2.jpg

Sir Frederick Walker Mott FRS (23 October 1853 Brighton, Sussex – 8 June 1926 Birmingham, Warwickshire) was one of the pioneers of biochemistry in Britain. [1] He is noted for his work in neuropathology and endocrine glands in relation to mental disorder, and consequently as psychiatrist and sociologist. He was Croonian Lecturer to the Royal College of Physicians for the year 1900.[2]

Timeline[edit]

  • 1884 Lecturer in physiology at the Charing Cross Hospital Medical School
  • 1895 Director of the London County Council laboratory at Claybury Asylum. [3]
  • 1896 Fellow of the Royal Society [4]
  • 1909–12 Fullerian Professor of Physiology and Comparative Anatomy
  • 1910 The Brain And The Voice In Speech And Song
  • 1916 The Effects of High Explosives Upon the Central Nervous System The Lancet 1 (1916): 331–338
  • 1919 Knighthood
  • 1923 The Action of Alcohol on Man (London, New York: Longmans Green) with Ernest Henry Starling (1866–1927), Robert Hutchison (1871–)
  • 1925–26 President of the Medico-Psychological Association
  • 1926 President of the Royal Medico-Psychological Association, the Royal Charter having been granted in March 1926

References[edit]

  1. ^ Patron of the Royal Institution. Johnmadjackfuller.homestead.com. Retrieved on 8 June 2014.
  2. ^ "MOTT. Frederick Walker". Who's Who 59: 1266. 1907. 
  3. ^ Frederick Mott biography. Studymore.org.uk. Retrieved on 8 June 2014.
  4. ^ "Notes". Nature 54 (1389): 133. 1896. doi:10.1038/054133a0.  edit
Academic offices
Preceded by
William Stirling
Fullerian Professor of Physiology
1909–1912
Succeeded by
William Bateson