Fredericksburg Memorial Library (Texas)

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Fredericksburg Memorial Library
Fredericksburg memorial library 2008.jpg
Fredericksburg Memorial Library
Fredericksburg Memorial Library is located in Texas
Fredericksburg Memorial Library
Fredericksburg Memorial Library
Location Courthouse Square
Fredericksburg, Texas
Coordinates 30°16′31″N 98°52′24″W / 30.27528°N 98.87333°W / 30.27528; -98.87333Coordinates: 30°16′31″N 98°52′24″W / 30.27528°N 98.87333°W / 30.27528; -98.87333
Built 1882
Architect Alfred Giles
Architectural style Romanesque Revival
Governing body Gillespie County
NRHP Reference # 71000935[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP March 11, 1971
Designated RTHL 1967

The Fredericksburg Memorial Library, also known as the Pioneer Memorial Library or the Old Courthouse, is located at 115 W. Main Street, Fredericksburg, Gillespie County, in the U.S. state of Texas. Designed by Alfred Giles, it was built in 1882 to replace the original 1855 courthouse, and was later superseded by the current 1939 courthouse designed by Edward Stein.[2] The first floor houses the Pioneer Memorial Library, while the second floor functions as community hall.[3] It is often called the McDermott Building because of the 1967 and 1984 restorations funded by Mr. & Mrs. Eugene McDermott.[4] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and was designated a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark in 1967.[5][6]

Construction[edit]

The native limestone structure was designed in 1882 by architect Alfred Giles in the Romanesque Revival style. Giles also designed the Brooks County Courthouse, Live Oak County Courthouse, Presidio County Courthouse, Webb County Courthouse and Wilson County Courthouse, as well as courthouses in the counties of Goliad and Kerr.[7][8] In 1909, Giles designed the facade of the Kendall County Courthouse.[9] He also designed the 1885 Llano County courthouse, which burned down in 1892.[10] On November 28, 1881. Giles was commissioned for $1,000 by the Gillespie County Commissioners. Built of local limestone, the Dietz Quarries supplied the limestone for the main structure, while John Dechert Quarries of Luckenbach supplied the limestone for the trim.[5] Building contractors John Heinen & James A. Courtney erected the structure at a cost of $23,000.[11]

Restoration[edit]

When a new courthouse was built in 1939, the old building served a variety of uses, until its state of disrepair forced it to be condemned in 1963. The building was restored in 1967 as a home for the library, a gift from Texas Instruments founder and Dallas philanthropists Mr. & Mrs. Eugene McDermott.[12] Eugene McDermott died in 1973.[13] A second renovation of the library occurred in 1984 with matching funds from Mrs. McDermott and the community.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ "TE-Gillespie County Courthouse". Texas Escapes. Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
  3. ^ Zelade, Richard (2011). Lone Star Guide to the Texas Hill Country. Taylor Trade Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-1-58979-609-6. 
  4. ^ "Fredericksburg Der Paradise". Texas Monthly: 125. May 1980. 
  5. ^ a b c "THC-NRHP Old Courthouse". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "Old Gillespie County Courthouse". Groundspeak, Inc. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
  7. ^ George, Mary Carolyn Hollors. "Giles, Alfred". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
  8. ^ "Courthouses designed by Alfred Giles". Texas Escapes – Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
  9. ^ Zelade, Richard (2011). Lone Star Guide to the Texas Hill Country. Taylor Trade Publishing. p. 65. ISBN 978-1-58979-609-6. 
  10. ^ "THC-1885 Llano County Courthouse". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  11. ^ "THC-Contractors, Gillespie Courthouse". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
  12. ^ Perez, Joan Jenkins. "McDermott, Eugene". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
  13. ^ Eugene McDermott at Find a Grave