Fredrik Pettersson

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Fredrik Pettersson
Fredrik Pettersson.jpg
Born (1987-06-10) June 10, 1987 (age 26)
Gothenburg, Sweden
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Right Wing
Shoots Right
National League A team
Former teams
HC Lugano
HC Donbass, Frölunda HC
National team  Sweden
NHL Draft 158th overall, 2005
Edmonton Oilers
Playing career 2007–present

John Fredrik Michael Pettersson (born June 10, 1987) is a Swedish professional ice hockey right winger, currently playing for HC Lugano in the Swiss National League A (NLA) and previously played for HC Donbass (KHL) and Frölunda HC of the Elitserien. He has played with the Swedish national team on several occasions and was a member of gold and bronze medal winning squads at the World Hockey Championship.

Playing career[edit]

Junior[edit]

A native of Gothenburg, Sweden, Pettersson played junior hockey in his hometown for hometown Frölunda HC's Under-18 and J20 SuperElit teams between 2002 and 2005.[1] Pettersson described himself as being an "energy player", using his skating ability and hard work to help his team.[2] He was a member of Frölunda teams that won the J18 gold medal in 2003, 2004 and 2005, and also won gold with the J20 team in 2005.[3]

The Edmonton Oilers selected Pettersson in the fifth round of the 2005 National Hockey League (NHL) Entry Draft, 157th overall.[1] He chose to complete his junior career in North America. He joined the Western Hockey League (WHL)'s Calgary Hitmen, who selected him with the 48th pick in the 2005 Canadian Hockey League import draft.[4] Pettersson adapted quickly; he scored 10 goals and 17 points in his first 19 WHL games,[2] en route to a 22-goal, 43-point season in 2005–06.[1] He improved to 50 points in 2006–07,[1] but after the Oilers declined to sign him to an NHL contract, Pettersson returned to Sweden to begin his professional career.[5]

Professional[edit]

Pettersson returned to Frölunda HC on a one-year contract for the 2007–08 Elitserien season. He made his professional debut and scored his first goal on September 24, 2007, against HV71.[3] A 13 point rookie season earned Pettersson a contract extension, and he doubled his offensive output to 26 points in 2008–09.[1] He scored 20 goals and improved to 38 points in 58 games in 2009–10.[3] After playing only 7–10 minutes per game in his first season, his improvements saw him playing as much as 25 minutes per night by his third. He caught the attention of the Atlanta Thrashers, who convinced Pettersson to return to North America and take a second chance at making the NHL and signed him to a contract.[5] He failed to make the Thrashers' roster, and was assigned to their American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate, the Chicago Wolves for the 2010–11 season.[6] He scored 11 goals and 32 points in 67 games for Chicago before again returning to Frölunda.[1]

Pettersson recorded a career high 40 points in his return season with Frölunda in 2011–12 before moving to the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL), signing with Ukrainian club HC Donbass for its inaugural season in Europe's top hockey league.[3] Appearing in 47 games with Donbass in 2012–13, Pettersson scored 7 goals and added 6 assists.[3]

International[edit]

Medal record
Competitor for  Sweden
Ice hockey
World Championship
Gold 2013 Sweden/Finland
Bronze 2010 Germany
World U18 Championship
Bronze 2005 Czech Republic

As a junior, Pettersson made three appearances with the Swedish under-20 team. He was a member of the under-18 squad that won the bronze medal at the 2005 IIHF World U18 Championships, and helped guide the Swedes to fifth and fourth place finishes in the 2006 and 2007 World Junior Hockey Championships.[7] Pettersson made his first senior world championship appearance with the Swedish national team in 2010. He had two points in seven games for the bronze medal-winning Swedes.[7] He returned for the 2013 World Championship where he scored seven points in nine games.[8] The Swedes defeated Switzerland, 5–1, in the final at Stockholm to become the first nation in 27 years to win the gold medal in their home country.[9]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2003–04 Frölunda HC J20 6 4 1 5 2 2 0 0 0 0
2004–05 Frölunda HC J20 24 9 8 17 32 6 5 3 8 16
2005–06 Calgary Hitmen WHL 59 22 21 43 47
2006–07 Calgary Hitmen WHL 52 21 29 50 50
2007–08 Frölunda HC J20 2 1 0 1 0
2007–08 Frölunda HC SEL 53 6 7 13 38 7 2 1 3 6
2008–09 Frölunda HC SEL 53 8 18 26 67 10 5 1 6 4
2009–10 Frölunda HC SEL 54 20 18 38 67 7 3 1 4 10
2010–11 Chicago Wolves AHL 67 11 21 32 46
2011–12 Frölunda HC SEL 54 16 24 40 58 6 1 2 3 6
2012–13 HC Donbass KHL 47 7 6 13 41
SEL totals 214 50 67 117 230 30 11 5 16 26
KHL totals 47 7 6 13 41

International[edit]

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
2005 Sweden Jr. WJC U18 7 1 2 3 6
2006 Sweden Jr. WJC 6 3 2 5 8
2007 Sweden Jr. WJC 6 1 1 2 8
2010 Sweden WC 7 1 1 2 4
2012 Sweden WC 1 0 0 0 0
2013 Sweden WC 9 3 4 7 4
Junior totals[10] 51 16 10 26 87
Senior totals[10] 52 10 9 19 28

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Fredrik Pettersson player profile". National Hockey League. Retrieved 2013-06-28. 
  2. ^ a b Wiebe, Karl (2005–06). "Home away from home". The Zone (Calgary Hitmen Hockey Club) 8 (2): 2–3. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "Fredrik Pettersson profile". Elite Hockey Prospects. Retrieved 2013-06-28. 
  4. ^ Flett, Cory; Watts, Jesse, eds. (2012). 2012–13 WHL Official Guide. Western Hockey League. p. 228. 
  5. ^ a b Vivlamore, Chris (2010-09-14). "Thrashers give Pettersson second chance at NHL". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved 2013-06-28. 
  6. ^ Casey, Elizabeth (2011-03-19). "Sweet home Chicago". Chicago Wolves Hockey Club. Retrieved 2013-06-28. 
  7. ^ a b Podnieks, Andrew, ed. (2011). IIHF Guide & Record Book 2012. International Ice Hockey Federation. p. 422. ISBN 978-0-7710-9598-6. 
  8. ^ "Player statistics by team – Sweden". International Ice Hockey Federation. 2013-05-19. Retrieved 2013-06-28. 
  9. ^ Podnieks, Andrew (2013-05-19). "Tre Kronor ends home-ice curse". International Ice Hockey Federaion. Retrieved 2013-06-28. 
  10. ^ a b "12. FREDRIK PETTERSSON". Swedish Ice Hockey Association. Retrieved 2013-07-19. 

External links[edit]