Free to Be... You and Me

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"Free to Be You and Me" redirects here. For the Supernatural episode, see Free to Be You and Me (Supernatural).
Free to Be… You and Me
Soundtrack album by Various artists
Released November 1972
Label Bell Records (original issue)
Arista Records (reissue)

Free to Be… You and Me, a project of the Ms. Foundation for Women,[1] is a record album and illustrated book first released in November 1972 featuring songs and stories sung or told by celebrities of the day (credited as "Marlo Thomas and Friends") including Alan Alda, Rosey Grier, Cicely Tyson, Carol Channing, Michael Jackson, Shirley Jones, Jack Cassidy, and Diana Ross. An ABC Afterschool Special using poetry, songs, and sketches, followed two years later in March 1974. The basic concept was to encourage post-1960s gender neutrality, saluting values such as individuality, tolerance, and comfort with one's identity. A major thematic message is that anyone—whether a boy or a girl—can achieve anything.

Overview[edit]

The original idea to create the album was that of Thomas,[2] who wanted to teach her then-young niece Dionne about life, in particular that it is acceptable to refute or reject the gender stereotypes in children's books of that time. The album was produced by Carole Hart, with music produced by Stephen J. Lawrence and Bruce Hart, with stories and poems directed by Alan Alda. Proceeds went to the Ms. Foundation for Women. The album has been published by Arista Records since 1983 (it was first published by Bell Records) and is still in print today. As of 2006 it sold more than 500,000 copies (a well-received sequel, Free to Be... A Family, was produced in 1988).

Well-known songs include "It's All Right to Cry," sung by football hero Rosey Grier; the title track by the New Seekers; "Helping," a Shel Silverstein poem performed by Tom Smothers; "Sisters and Brothers" by the Voices of East Harlem; and "When We Grow Up" performed by Diana Ross on the album and by Roberta Flack and a teenage Michael Jackson on the special.

Other sketches, some of them animated in the television special, include "Atalanta," co-narrated by Thomas and Alda, a retelling of the ancient Greek legend of Atalanta; "Boy Meets Girl" with Thomas and Mel Brooks providing the voices for puppets, designed, performed and manipulated by Wayland Flowers, resembling human babies, who use cultural gender stereotypes to try to discover which is a boy and which a girl; "William's Doll", based on Charlotte Zolotow's picture book about a boy whose family resists his requests for a doll until his grandmother explains that William wishes to practice being a good father; and "Dudley Pippin" with Robert Morse and Billy De Wolfe, based on stories by Phil Ressner.

The children pictured on the original LP jacket were schoolmates of Abigail, Robin, and David Pogrebin, children of Letty Cottin Pogrebin, then editor of Ms.. Most of the children attended Corlears School.

Thomas "and friends" followed Free to Be... You and Me with a 1987 sequel, Free to Be a Family, the first primetime variety show created and produced in both the United States and the Soviet Union.

Television special[edit]

The television special, produced by Free to Be Productions in association with Teru Murakami-Fred Wolf Films, Inc. and cosponsored by the Ms. Foundation, first aired March 11, 1974, on ABC. It earned an 18.6 rating/27 share and went on to win an Emmy. 16-mm prints of the special were also struck, and some schoolchildren from the 1970s and 1980s remember seeing the television special, or the filmstrip based on the special, in their school during that period.

The special appeared occasionally on HBO in the 1980s. It was released on VHS in 1983. It was also seen on the cable channel TV Land, yet has not been aired on any network since.

A Region 1 DVD of the television special was released in November 2001, and in 2010, a newly remastered version was released with a previously unshown scene featuring Dustin Hoffman, and other extras.

TV cast[edit]

Track listing (New York Cast album)[edit]

Some material here is left out of the TV special and vice versa while other material appears only in the accompanying hardcover book.

Act One[edit]

  1. "Free To Be... You And Me" – Music by Stephen J. Lawrence, Lyrics by Bruce Hart, Performed by The New Seekers
  2. "Boy Meets Girl" – Written by Carl Reiner and Peter Stone, Performed by Mel Brooks and Marlo Thomas
  3. "When We Grow Up" – Music by Stephen J. Lawrence, Lyrics by Shelly Miller, Performed by Roberta Flack and Michael Jackson on the special and Diana Ross on the soundtrack CD.
  4. "Don't Dress Your Cat In An Apron" – Written by Dan Greenburg, Performed by Billy De Wolfe

Act Two[edit]

  1. "Parents Are People" – Music and Lyrics by Carol Hall, Performed by Harry Belafonte and Marlo Thomas
  2. "Housework" – Written by Sheldon Harnick, Performed by Carol Channing
  3. "Helping" – Written by Shel Silverstein, Performed by Tom Smothers
  4. "Ladies First" – Performed by Marlo Thomas (based on a Shel Silverstein poem about a girl whose insistence on always getting to "go first" simply because she is a girl ends up making her the chosen meal of hungry tigers)
  5. "Dudley Pippin And The Principal" – Written by Phil Ressner, Performed by Billy De Wolfe, Bobby Morse, and Marlo Thomas

Act Three[edit]

  1. "It's All Right to Cry" – Music and Lyrics by Carol Hall, Performed by Rosey Grier
  2. "Sisters and Brothers" – Music by Stephen J. Lawrence, Lyrics by Bruce Hart, Performed by Sisters and Brothers
  3. "William's Doll" – Music by Mary Rodgers, Lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, Performed by Alan Alda and Marlo Thomas (based on the children's book of the same name, about a boy whose family is perplexed by his desire for a doll to care for)
  4. "My Dog is a Plumber" – Written by Dan Greenburg, Performed by Dick Cavett.

Act Four[edit]

  1. "Atalanta" – Written by Betty Miles, Performed by Alan Alda and Marlo Thomas
  2. "Grandma" – Written by Carole Hart, Performed by Diana Sands
  3. "Girl Land" – Music by Mary Rodgers, Lyrics by Bruce Hart, Performed by Jack Cassidy and Shirley Jones
  4. "Dudley Pippin And His No-Friend" – Written by Phil Ressner, Performed by Bobby Morse and Marlo Thomas
  5. "Glad To Have A Friend Like You" – Music and Lyrics by Carol Hall, Performed by Marlo Thomas

Epilogue[edit]

  1. "Free To Be... You And Me" – Reprise

Bonus Tracks[edit]

Different performances than those included in the film – and not included on the original LP/CD

  1. "I'd Rather Be The Sun" – Performed by Dionne Warwick
  2. "Love Goes Around in a Circle" – Performed by Kris Kristofferson, Rita Coolidge & Cast

40th Anniversary[edit]

The Paley Center for Media hosted an event that was co-moderated by Marlo Thomas and Gloria Steinem, and included many of the participants in the original project.[3]

Book[edit]

To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the original project, a book called When We Were Free to Be Looking Back at a Children's Classic and the Difference It Made was published.[4][5][6]

Criticism[edit]

Kyle Smith from the New York Post claimed the project emasculated men.[7] A rebuttal to the claim was posted to The Daily Beast.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Martin, Rachel (7 December 2012). "40 Years On, 'Free To Be' Still Resonates" (Audio interview). NPR. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  2. ^ Thomas, Marlo. "Birth of "Free to Be... You and Me"" (Video interview). Makers. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  3. ^ "The Paley Center Celebrates: Free to Be…You and Me at 40" (Video - moderated panel). The Paley Center for Media. 11 March 2014. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  4. ^ Kois, Dan (23 October 2012). "Free To Be: Forty years ago, a bunch of feminists made an album. They wanted to change ... … everything.". Slate. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  5. ^ Thomas, Marlo (30 January 2013). "Free to Be... You and Me -- Forty Years Later". Huffington Post. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  6. ^ Gumbrecht, Jamie (11 March 2014). "Remembering 'Free to Be... You and Me,' 40 years later". CNN. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  7. ^ Smith, Kyle (8 March 2014). "How ‘Free to Be … You and Me’ emasculated men". New York Post. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  8. ^ Shire, Emily (11 March 2014). "‘Free to Be…You and Me’ Did Not Emasculate Men". The Daily Beast. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]