Freedom Support Act

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FREEDOM Support Act
Great Seal of the United States
Other short titles Freedom for Russia and Emerging Eurasian Democracies and Open Markets Support Act of 1992
Long title An Act to support freedom and open markets in the independent states of the former Soviet Union, and for other purposes.
Nicknames American Agribusiness Centers and Practitioners Exchange Act of 1992
Enacted by the 102nd United States Congress
Effective October 24, 1992
Citations
Public Law 102-511
Statutes at Large 106 Stat. 3320
Legislative history
  • Introduced in the Senate as S. 2532 by Claiborne Pell (D-RI) on April 7, 1992
  • Committee consideration by Senate Foreign Relations
  • Passed the Senate on July 2, 1992 (76-20, Roll call vote 148, via Senate.gov)
  • Passed the House on August 6, 1992 (passed without objection)
  • Reported by the joint conference committee on October 1, 1992; agreed to by the Senate on October 1, 1992 (agreed voice vote) and by the House on October 3, 1992 (232-164, Roll call vote 462, via Clerk.House.gov)
  • Signed into law by President George H.W. Bush on October 24, 1992

The FREEDOM Support Act of 1992 (Freedom for Russia and Emerging Eurasian Democracies and Open Markets Support Act,[1] FSA, HR 282) is an act passed by the United States Congress. It is not to be confused with the Iran Freedom and Support Act of 2005 (S 333).

Formation of the Act[edit]

The bill H.R.4547 was sponsored by Rep Dante B. Fascell and introduced March 24, 1992. It was passed by the House on August 6, 1992.[2]

The bill was introduced as S.2532 into the Senate on April 7, 1992 and sponsored by Sen Claiborne Pell. It passed the Senate on July 2, 1992.[3]

The FSA was signed into law on October 24, 1992, by President George H.W. Bush and assigned Public Law No. 102 - 511 [1]

Provisions of the Act[edit]

Created through the act are the U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation, the Armenia School Connectivity Program and other organizations founded to foster growth in the former Soviet Union.

Section 102 of the FREEDOM Support Act creates the position of a Coordinator within the Department of State.

In 1992, funding from the FREEDOM Support Act and USAID helped create American Business Centers (ABCs) under the United States Commercial Service, designed to operate in the developing markets of Russia and the Newly Independent States to stimulate economic growth and create jobs in the United States.

Section 907 specifically prohibits Azerbaijan from participating in programs created by the act.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Peters, Gerhard; Woolley, John T. "George Bush: "Statement on Signing the FREEDOM Support Act," October 24, 1992". The American Presidency Project. University of California - Santa Barbara. 
  2. ^ http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.uscongress/legislation.102hr4547
  3. ^ "Policy Archive". Retrieved 10 February 2011. 

See also[edit]

History of U.S. Assistance to the New Independent States in the Clinton Administration on the State Department's Website