French legislative election, 2002

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French legislative election, 2002
France
1997 ←
9 June and 16 June 2002 → 2007

All 577 seats to the French National Assembly
289 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Jean-Pierre Raffarin par Guillaume Kretz.jpg Socialist rally Zenith 2007 05 29 n3.jpg Francois bayrou close.jpg
Leader Jean-Pierre Raffarin François Hollande François Bayrou
Party UMP PS UDF
Leader's seat Vienne
(Senate)
Corrèze-1st Pyrénées-Atlantiques-2nd
Last election new party 255 seats 112 seats
Seats won 357 140 29
Seat change Increase357 Decrease115 Decrease83
Popular vote 8,408,023 (1st round)
10,026,669 (2nd round)
6,086,599 (1st round)
7,482,169 (2nd round)
1,226,462 (1st round)
832,785 (2nd round)
Percentage 33.30% (1st round)
47.26% (2nd round)
24.11% (1st round)
35.26% (2nd round)
4.86% (1st round)
3.92% (2nd round)

Legislatives2002.png

Colours denote the winning party, as shown in the main table of results.

Prime Minister before election

Jean-Pierre Raffarin
UMP

Prime Minister-designate

Jean-Pierre Raffarin
UMP

Armoiries république française.svg
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The French legislative elections took place on 9 June and 16 June 2002 to elect the 12th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic, in a context of political crisis.

The Socialist Prime Minister Lionel Jospin announced his political retirement after his elimination at the first round of the 2002 French presidential election. President Jacques Chirac was easily reelected, all the Republican parties having called to block far-right leader Jean-Marie Le Pen. Chirac's conservative supporters created the Union for the Presidential Majority (Union pour la majorité présidentielle or UMP) to prepare for the legislative elections.

The first round of the presidential election was a shock for the two main coalitions. The candidates of the parliamentary right obtained 32% of votes, and the candidates of the "Plural Left" only 27%. In the first polls, for the legislative elections, they were equal.

The UMP campaigned against "cohabitation", which is blamed for causing confusion profitable to the far-right and far-left. Jean-Pierre Raffarin, a relatively low-profile politician who said he would listen to "France at the bottom", was chosen as the party's candidate for Prime Minister.

Without a real leader, and staggered by the results of 21 April, the left was in difficulty. The Socialist chairman François Hollande tried to revive the "Plural Left" under the name of "United Left"; but the effort was undermined by the fact that it didn't have a real programme. Furthermore, the left-wing parties could not motivate their voters against an unrecognized and apparently uncontroversial politician like Jean-Pierre Raffarin. In addition part of the left-wing electorate did not want a new "cohabitation". Finally, the polls indicated a growing advantage for the Presidential Majority.

The right won the elections and the UMP obtained a large parliamentary majority of 394 seats. For the third time under the Fifth Republic, a party acquired an absolute majority (the "blue surge"). Five months later, it became the Union for a Popular Movement.

On the left, the Socialist Party achieved a better result than at the winning 1997 elections, but its allies were crushed. The far-left returned towards its usual level. In far-right, the National Front lost the half of its 5 May voters.

Results[edit]

e • d Summary of the 9 and 16 June 2002 French National Assembly elections results
Parties and coalitions 1st round 2nd round Total
seats
Votes  % Seats Votes  %
Union for a Popular Movement (Union pour un mouvement populaire) UMP 8,408,023 33.30 48 10,026,669 47.26 357
Union for French Democracy (Union pour la démocratie française) UDF 1,226,462 4.86 6 832,785 3.92 29
Miscellaneous Right DVD 921,973 3.65 3 274,374 1.29 8
Movement for France (Mouvement pour la France) MPF 202,831 0.80 1 1
Liberal Democracy (Démocratie libérale) DL 104,767 0.41 1 2
Rally for France (Rassemblement pour la France) RPF 94,222 0.37 0 61,605 0.29 2
Presidential Majority (Right) 10,958,278 43.39 59 11,195,433 52.76 399
Socialist Party (Parti socialiste) PS 6,086,599 24.11 1 7,482,169 35.26 140
French Communist Party (Parti communiste français) PCF 1,216,178 4.82 0 690,807 3.26 21
The Greens (Les Verts) VEC 1,138,222 4.51 0 677,933 3.19 3
Radical Party of the Left (Parti radical de gauche) PRG 388,891 1.54 0 455,360 2.15 7
Miscellaneous Left DVG 275,533 1.09 0 268,715 1.27 6
United Left 9,105,423 36.07 1 9,574,984 45.13 178
National Front (Front national) FN 2,862,960 11.34 0 393,205 1.85
Hunting, Fishing, Nature, Traditions (Chasse, pêche, nature, traditions) CPNT 422,448 1.67 0 0
Revolutionary Communist League (Ligue communiste révolutionnaire) LCR 320,467 1.27 0 0
Workers' Struggle (Lutte ouvrière) LO 301,984 1.20 0 0
Republican Pole (Pôle républicain) 299,897 1.19 0 12,679 0.06 0
Other Ecologists 295,899 1.17 0 0
National Republican Movement (Mouvement national républicain) MNR 276,376 1.09 0 0
Miscellaneous DIV 194,946 0.77 0 13,036 0.06 1
Far left ExG 81,558 0.32 0 0
Regionalists 66,240 0.26 0 28,689 0.14 0
Other Far right ExD 59,549 0.24 0 0
Total 25,246,045 100.00 60 21,221,026 100.00 577
Abstention: 35.58% (1st round), 39.68% (2nd round)
Popular vote (first round)
UMP
  
33.30%
PS
  
24.11%
FN
  
11.34%
UDF
  
4.86%
PCF
  
4.82%
The Greens
  
4.51%
DVD
  
3.65%
CPTNT
  
1.67%
PRG
  
1.54%
LCR
  
1.27%
LO
  
1.20%
PR
  
1.19%
Other Ecologists
  
1.17%
MNR
  
1.09%
DVG
  
1.09%
Others
  
3.19%

12th Assembly by Parliamentary Group[edit]

Group Members
  UMP Group 364
  Socialist Group 149
  UDF Group 30
  Communist Group 22
  Non-Inscrits 12
Total: 577