Frey's procedure

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Pancreas.

Frey's procedure is a surgical technique used in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis in which the diseased portions of the pancreas head are cored out. A lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (LRLPJ) is then performed in which a loop of the jejunum is then mobilized and attached over the exposed pancreatic duct to allow better drainage of the pancreas, including its head.[1]

Indication[edit]

Frey's operation is indicated on patients with chronic pancreatitis who have "head dominant" disease.

Comparison to Puestow procedure[edit]

Compared with a Puestow procedure, a Frey's procedure allows for better drainage of the pancreatic head.

Complications[edit]

Postoperative complications after LRLPJ are usually septic in nature and are likely to occur more often in patients in whom endoscopic pancreatic stenting has been performed before surgical intervention.[2] Pancreatic endocrine insufficiency occurs in 60% of patients.

Eponym[edit]

It is named for the American surgeon C. F. Frey, who together with G. J. Smith first described it in 1987.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gourgiotis S, Germanos S, Ridolfini MP (2007). "Surgical management of chronic pancreatitis". Hbpd Int 6 (2): 121–33. PMID 17374569. 
  2. ^ Chaudhary A, Negi SS, Masood S, Thombare M (2004). "Complications after Frey's procedure for chronic pancreatitis". Am. J. Surg. 188 (3): 277–281. doi:10.1016/j.amjsurg.2004.06.012. PMID 15450834. 
  3. ^ Frey, CF; Smith GJ (1987). "Description and rationale of a new operation for chronic pancreatitis.". Pancreas 2 (6): 701–7. doi:10.1097/00006676-198711000-00014. 

Additional reading[edit]

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