From Eroica with Love

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From Eroica with Love
Eroica vol34.jpg
Cover of Japanese volume 34
エロイカより愛をこめて
(Eroica Yori Ai o Komete)
Genre Comedy
Manga
Written by Yasuko Aoike
Published by Akita Shoten
English publisher
Demographic Shōjo
Magazine Princess
Original run 1976 – ongoing
Volumes 39
Anime and Manga portal

From Eroica with Love (Japanese: エロイカより愛をこめて Hepburn: Eroica Yori Ai o Komete?) is a shōjo manga by Yasuko Aoike which originally began publication in 1976 by Akita Shoten. The series ran irregularly in the Japanese anthology magazine Viva Princess from December 1976 to April 1979, then moved to the sister publication Princess beginning in September 1979.[1] It was featured regularly in Princess, with several later side stories appearing in Viva Princess, until August 1989. It went on hiatus for several years, then reappeared in Princess in May 1995 and ran irregularly through December 2007. As of January 2009, it is once again regularly featured in Princess Gold. The English translation by CMX began publication in 2004. It has also been translated to Chinese, as Romantic Hero, with 21 volumes; as well as to Thai, with 20 volumes.

The series revolves around the adventures of Dorian Red Gloria, Earl of Gloria, an openly gay English lord who is an art thief known as "Eroica", and Major Klaus Heinz von dem Eberbach, an uptight West German NATO major.

The series is driven by frequent inadvertent encounters between Dorian and Klaus, with Dorian often disrupting Klaus's missions. Dorian has developed a fondness for and flirts incessantly with Klaus, who typically reacts with extreme disgust. Other reoccurring characters include Dorian and Klaus's respective subordinates and Klaus's enemies from the Russian KGB.

The series is generally comedic, although it involves violence, theft, and bizarre international incidents. Much of the series spoofs spy stories, as indicated by the title, a play on the James Bond novel From Russia, with Love.

Plot[edit]

Release[edit]

No. Original release date Original ISBN English release date English ISBN
1 1978 ISBN 4-253-07109-0 November 28, 2004 ISBN 1-4012-0519-4
A Thousand Kisses, Iron Klaus and Achillies' Last Stand
2 1980 ISBN 4-253-07110-4 January 12, 2005 ISBN 1-4012-0520-8
Love in Greece and Dramatic Spring, also a non-Eroica-story I.V.Y. Navy
3 1981 ISBN 4-253-07111-2 April 13, 2005 ISBN 1-4012-0521-6
In'shallah and Hallelujah Express
4 1981 ISBN 4-253-07112-0 July 13, 2005 ISBN 1-4012-0523-2
Veni, Vidi, Vici and Alaskan Front (part 1)
5 1981 ISBN 4-253-07113-9 October 12, 2005 ISBN 1-4012-0522-4
Alaskan Front (part 2)
6 1982 ISBN 4-253-07114-7 February 8, 2006 ISBN 1-4012-0875-4
Special Vacation Orders and Glass Target (part 1)
7 1982 ISBN 4-253-07115-5 September 30, 2006 ISBN 1-4012-0876-2
Glass Target (part 2) and Midnight Collector
8 1982 ISBN 4-253-07116-3 January 31, 2007 ISBN 1-4012-0877-0
Seven Days in September (part 1)
9 1983 ISBN 4-253-07117-1 May 2, 2007 ISBN 1-4012-0878-9
Seven Days in September (part 2)
10 1983 ISBN 4-253-07118-X September 30, 2007 ISBN 1-4012-0879-7
Seven Days in September (part 3), Party and The Laughing Cardinals (part 1)
11 1983 ISBN 4-253-07119-8 December 31, 2007 ISBN 1-4012-0880-0
The Laughing Cardinals (part 2)
12 1984 ISBN 4-253-07120-1 March 31, 2008 ISBN 9781401208813
The Laughing Cardinals (part 3), A Tale of Alaska, From Lawrence with Love and The Seventh Seal (part 1)
13 1985 ISBN 4-253-07121-X July 9, 2008 ISBN 9781401208820
The Seventh Seal (part 2)
14 1985 ISBN 4-253-07122-8 July 21, 2009 ISBN 9781401208837
The Seventh Seal (part 3)
15 1986 ISBN 4-253-07123-6 March 16, 2010[2] ISBN 978-1401208844
The Seventh Seal (part 4), Mr Lawrence Writes A Letter, Intermission and Eau de Cologne
No. Release date ISBN
16 1987 ISBN 4-253-07124-4
17 1987 ISBN 4-253-07125-2
18 1988 ISBN 4-253-07126-0
19 1988 ISBN 4-253-07127-9
20 1996 ISBN 4-253-07128-7
21 1997 ISBN 4-253-07129-5
22 1997 ISBN 4-253-07130-9
23 1998 ISBN 4-253-07131-7
24 1999 ISBN 4-253-07132-5
25 1999 ISBN 4-253-07460-X
26 2000 ISBN 4-253-07461-8
27 2002 ISBN 4-253-07462-6
28 2003 ISBN 978-4-253-07477-3
29 2003 ISBN 4-253-07480-4
30 2004 ISBN 4-253-07481-2
31 2005 ISBN 4-253-19451-6
32 2005 ISBN 978-4-253-19452-5
33 2006 ISBN 4-253-19453-2
34 2006/12/15[3] ISBN 978-4253194549
35 2009/6/16[4] ISBN 978-4253194556
36 2010/2/16[5] ISBN 978-4253194563
37 2010/12/16[6] ISBN 978-4253194570
38 2011/08/12 ISBN 9784253194587
39 2012

Reception[edit]

As of the mid-1980s, fan translations of From Eroica with Love began to circulate through the slash fiction community,[7] creating a "tenuous link" between slash and shōnen-ai.[8] From Eroica with Love is more popular with slash fans than it has been with dōjinshi artists.[7] The series has been described as an example of a movement in shōnen-ai and yaoi to depict more masculine men, as part of the audience's increasing comfort with objectifying males.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Aoike Yasuko Official Website". Retrieved 2010-05-09. 
  2. ^ http://www.amazon.com/dp/1401208843
  3. ^ http://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/4253194540
  4. ^ http://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/4253194559
  5. ^ http://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/4253194567
  6. ^ http://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/4253194575
  7. ^ a b Thorn, Matthew (2004) Girls And Women Getting Out Of Hand: The Pleasure And Politics Of Japan's Amateur Comics Community in Fanning the Flames: Fans and Consumer Culture in Contemporary Japan William W. Kelly, ed., State University of New York Press
  8. ^ "Girls' Stuff, May (?) '94". 
  9. ^ Suzuki, Kazuko. (1999) "Pornography or Therapy? Japanese Girls Creating the Yaoi Phenomenon". In Sherrie Inness, ed., Millennium Girls: Today's Girls Around the World. London: Rowman & Littlefield, p.251 ISBN 0-8476-9136-5, ISBN 0-8476-9137-3.

External links[edit]