Frontbench team of David Shearer

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David Shearer's first frontbench team was announced in December 2011 following the New Zealand general election, 2011 and Shearer's own election to the Labour leadership;[1][2] on 25 February 2013 Shearer announced his first major portfolio reshuffle.[3] Additional portfolios were adjusted in June 2013 after the death of sitting MP and Maori Affairs spokesperson Parekura Horomia.[4][5]

Rank Shadow Minister Portfolio
1 David Shearer Leader of the Opposition
Spokesperson for the Security Intelligence Service
Spokesperson for Science & Innovation
2 Grant Robertson Deputy Leader
Spokesperson on Employment
Spokesperson for Arts, Culture & Heritage
3 David Parker Finance Spokesperson
Shadow Attorney-General
4 Jacinda Ardern Spokesperson for Social Development
Spokesperson for Children
Associate Spokesperson for Arts, Culture & Heritage
5 Clayton Cosgrove Spokesperson for State-Owned Enterprises
Spokesperson for Commerce
Spokesperson for Trade Negotiations
Associate Finance Spokesperson
6 Annette King Spokesperson for Health
7 Shane Jones Spokesperson for Māori Affairs
Spokesperson for Regional Development
Spokesperson for Forestry
Associate Finance Spokesperson
8 Phil Twyford Spokesperson for Housing
Spokesperson for Auckland Issues
Associate Spokesperson for the Environment
9 Maryan Street Spokesperson for the Environment
Spokesperson for Disarmament & Arms Control
Associate Spokesperson for Foreign Affairs
10 Chris Hipkins Chief Whip
Spokesperson for Education
11 Nanaia Mahuta Spokesperson for Youth Affairs
Spokesperson on Maori Development
Associate Spokesperson for Education (Maori)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Labour reveals new front bench nzherald.co.nz, 19 December 2011
  2. ^ "Shearer to chart new direction for Labour". stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  3. ^ "Labour unveils major reshuffle". Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  4. ^ "Today in politics: Saturday June 1, 2013". Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  5. ^ "MPs". labour.org.nz. Retrieved 2 June 2013.