Fruit enzyme

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Fruit enzyme (Chinese 水果酵素) is a collective term for the liquid made by various fermentation processes, to claim that this liquid contains enzymes from those fruits. There is no scientific analysis offered to show what is actually in this liquid other than a high alcohol content and fruit juice residue. "Fruit enzyme" is quoted on the internet as being made by adding lemon and sugar to pieces of other fruit and letting it ferment at room temperature for 2 to 3 weeks. The resulting liquid is then decanted, refrigerated and consumed within 1 month, the dosage being about 30ml taken 1 hour before or after meals[1] and said to be beneficial for various ailments. Fruit enzyme preparation instructions usually specify that ingredients and utensils should be thoroughly air-dried in an attempt to avoid contamination by various molds[2] which can cause food poisoning.[3]

Benefits[edit]

According to the Chiropractic community the human population carries toxicants, which are manufactured chemical toxic compounds.[4] Crinnion (a chiropractor who believes in the use of alternative medicine) said “Promoting proper digestion and elimination can dramatically reduce the amount of antigens and endotoxins in your patients’ systems.” The digestive system is the main place where the body battles toxins and toxicants, and if the digestive system is not functioning correctly then the human will feel ill in many situations,.[4] Taking digestive enzymes can create the use for ATP for digestion allowing ATP to be used in other systems in the body creating a well working body in general.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "How to make fruit enzyme" on www.squidoo.com/Fruit-Enzyme-Health-Supplement (apparently a poor translation from a Chinese source); creating a link to that site is not currently possible
  2. ^ Fruit Enzyme DIY blog post by a Malaysian Chinese person
  3. ^ Molds On Food: Are They Dangerous? United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service
  4. ^ a b c Crinnion, Walter. enzymes "Digestive Enzymes and Detoxification". Retrieved 2 December 2011.