Fu (surname)

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Fu is a common spelling for some Chinese surnames, such as 傅, 符, 苻, 付, 扶, 伏, and 富.

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(Mandarin: Fù) (Hokkien: Poh) is an ancient Han Chinese surname of imperial origin which is at least 4,000 years old.

The great-great-great-grandson of the Yellow Emperor, Dayou, bestowed this surname to his son Fu Yi and his descendants. Dayou is the eldest son of Danzhu and grandson of Emperor Yao.

It is also a sinicized surname for several clans of Manchurian nobility. During the Qing Dynasty, there was an ongoing process of Sinicization of surnames and many Manchurian clans such as the Fu, Fuca, Fugiya, Fuciri, Fulkuru, Fujuri and Fulha adopted 傅 or 富 as their Han surname.


Notable People (in chronological order)[edit]

  • Fu Yue (傅說) (1200 BC) - A Shang Dynasty premier during the reign of Emperor Wu Ding.
  • Fu Kuan (傅寬) (d. 189 BC) - Marquis of Yangling (posthumously Marquis Jing), a follower of Liu Bang.[1]
  • Fu Jing (傅精) (d. 165 BC) - 2nd Marquis Jing.[2]
  • Fu Ze (傅則) (d. 153 BC) - 3rd Marquis Jing.[3]
  • Fu Yan (傅偃) (d. 122 BC) - 4th and final Marquis Jing. In 122 BC he was tried for plotting a rebellion with the King of Huainan, Liu An. His state was abolished when he died.[4]
  • Fu Jiezi (傅介子) - A Han Dynasty officer who assassinated the king of the Xiongnu in 77 BC.[5]
  • Consort Fu (傅昭儀) (? - 3 BC) - A Han Dynasty imperial consort and favorite of Emperor Yuan
  • Fu Xi (傅喜) - A Han Dynasty Marshall of State from 6 - 1 BC.[6]
  • Empress Fu (Ai) (傅皇后) ( (? - 1 BC) - A Han Dynasty Empress.
  • Fu Jun (傅俊) (1st century AD) - One of the Yuntai 28 generals who served Emperor Guangwu of Han.
  • Fu Yu (? - 87 AD) - Colonel-Protector in Han Dynasty China. Killed in a Ch'iang rebellion in 87 AD.[7]
  • Fu Xie (187 AD) - Han dynasty imperial court adviser.[8]
  • Fu Rong (? - 222 AD) - A general of Liu Bei's state of Shu Han during the Three Kingdoms period who was legendary for his bravery in the face of certain death against Sun Quan's forces.
  • Fu Xun (傅巽) - A Politician of the state of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period.
  • Fu Jia - An official of Cao Wei (aka Fu Gu[9]) (209 - 255 AD)
  • Fu Qian (傅僉) (216 - 263 AD) - A General of Shu Han during the Three Kingdoms period.
  • Fu Xuan (傅玄) (217 - 278 AD) - A politician, scholar, writer, and poet during the period from the Cao Wei to Western Jin Dynasty.
  • Fu Hu (傅虎) (? - 312 AD) - A Han Zhao dynasty general who sacrificed his life to save Emperor Liu Yao.
  • Fu Chang (? - 330) - A writer of the Later Zhao dynasty.[10]
  • Fu Liang (傅亮) (374 - 426 AD) - A high level official of the Liu Song Dynasty, who, along with his colleagues Xu Xianzhi and Xie Hui, deposed Emperor Shao.
  • Fu Qi (6th century AD) (傅岐) - An adviser to Emperor Wu of Liang.
  • Fu Yi (傅奕) (554 - 639) - A Sui Dynasty official and historiographer during the reign of Emperor Gaozu of the Tang Dynasty.
  • Fu Youyi (傅遊藝) (? - 691 AD) - An official of Wu Zetian's Zhou Dynasty.
  • Fu Wenjing (傅文靜) - A Tang Dynasty magistrate instrumental in the early rise of Niu Xianke.
  • Fu Yaoyu (1024 - 1091 AD)
  • Fu Youde (傅友德) (? - 1394) - A General and Navy Commander of the Ming Dynasty who subdued the Mongols with an army of 300,000 soldiers.
  • Fu An (? - 1429 AD)
  • Fu Shan (1607 - 1684 AD) - A Ming and Qing dynasty artist [11]
  • Fu Honglie (傅弘烈) (? - 1680 AD)
  • Fu Nai (1758 - 1811 AD)
  • Fu Zuoyi (1895 - 1974 AD)
  • Fu Daqing (1900 - c.1944 AD)
  • Alexander Fu Sheng (傅聲) (1954 - 1983 AD) - Hong Kong Martial Arts Film Star
  • Fu Haitao (born 1993) - Chinese triple jumper

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Li Cunshen(862-June 16, 924); which Surname Li was given by emperor.

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Fu Pi (? - 386 AD)

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Fu Bi (1004 - 1083 AD)[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ssu-ma Chien, The Grand Scribes Records, Vol. VIII, ed. William H. Nienhauser, Jr.
  2. ^ Ssu-ma Chien, The Grand Scribes Records, Vol. VIII, ed. William H. Nienhauser, Jr.
  3. ^ Ssu-ma Chien, The Grand Scribes Records, Vol. VIII, ed. William H. Nienhauser, Jr.
  4. ^ Ssu-ma Chien, The Grand Scribes Records, Vol. VIII, ed. William H. Nienhauser, Jr.
  5. ^ The Cambridge History of China Vol. 1, p. 409
  6. ^ The Cambridge History of China Vol. 1, p. 218
  7. ^ The Cambridge History of China Vol. 1, p. 428
  8. ^ The Cambridge History of China Vol. 1, p. 434
  9. ^ David R. Knechtges and Taiping Chang, Ancient and Early Medieval Chinese Literature (vol.I): A Reference Guide, p. 236.
  10. ^ David R. Knechtges an Taiping Chan, Ancient an Early Medieval Chinese Literature, p. 235.
  11. ^ http://history.cultural-china.com/en/49History2629.html
  12. ^ http://blog.voc.com.cn/blog_showone_type_blog_id_636856_p_1.html