Fumiyo Kōno

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Fumiyo Kōno (こうの史代 Kōno Fuyumi?, born 28 September 1968[1]) is a Japanese manga artist from Nishi-ku, Hiroshima, known for her Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms. She was born in Hiroshima in 1968 and began drawing manga when she was in junior high school.[2] She states that she began drawing manga because her parents would not often buy her manga.[3] Kōno studied science at Hiroshima University and moved to Tokyo, becoming an assistant to Katsuyuki Toda, Aki Morino, and Fumiko Tanigawa. Kōno made her commercial debut in 1995 with Machikado Hana Dayori.[2] She feels that Osamu Tezuka and Fujiko Fujio were among her early influences, but then she was inspired by Sanpei Shirato's literary style and at present, she takes inspiration from Yu Takita's versatility.[3] She graduated from University of the Air in 2001 with a major in Humanities.[2]

Selected works[edit]

  • Machikado Hana Da yori (街角花だより?) (serialized 1995–1996 and 2002–2003, collected 2007, Futabasha), 1 volume [4]
  • Pippira Noto (ぴっぴら帳?) (serialized 1997–2004, collected 2009, Futabasha),[5][6] 2 volumes
    • Pippira Nōto 1 (2000 Futabasha)[7]
    • Pippira Nōto: Kanketsuhen (2004 Futabasha)[8]
  • Kokko-san (こっこさん?) (serialized 1999–2001, collected 2005, Ohzora Shuppan)[9]
  • Nagai Michi (長い道?) (serialized 2001–2004, collected 2005, Futabasha)[10] (2009 reprint Futabasha)[11]
  • Kappa no Neneko (かっぱのねね子?) (serialized 2001–2002, Fukuinkan Shoten Publishers)
  • Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms (夕凪の街 桜の国 Yūnagi no Machi, Sakura no Kuni?) (2003–2004, serialized in Manga Action, Futabasha) (serialized 2002 and 2004, collected 2004, Futabasha)[12][13]
  • San-san Roku (さんさん録?) (serialized 2004–2006, collected 2006, Futabasha)[14][15]
  • Kono Sekai no Katasumi ni (この世界の片隅に In a Corner of this World?) (serialized 2007-2009, collected 2008–2009, Futabasha)[16][17][18]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "朝日新聞手塚治虫文化賞" [Asahi Shimbun Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize] (in Japanese). Asahi Shimbun. Archived from the original on 17 June 2005. Retrieved 23 February 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d "2004 Japan Media Arts Festival Manga Division Grand Prize YUNAGI NO MACHI SAKURA NO KUNI". Japan Media Arts Festival. Retrieved 23 February 2010. 
  3. ^ a b http://www.jmanga.com/features/interview-with-kouno-sensei
  4. ^ "街角花だより" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  5. ^ "コミック文庫)ぴっぴら帳 1" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  6. ^ "コミック文庫)ぴっぴら帳 2" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  7. ^ "ぴっぴら帳 1" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  8. ^ "ぴっぴら帳 完結編" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  9. ^ "こっこさん" (in Japanese). Ohzora Shuppan. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  10. ^ "長い道" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  11. ^ "コミック文庫)長い道" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  12. ^ "夕凪の街 桜の国" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  13. ^ "コミック文庫)夕凪の街 桜の国" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  14. ^ "さんさん録 1" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  15. ^ "さんさん録 2" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  16. ^ "この世界の片隅に 上" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  17. ^ "この世界の片隅に 下" (in Japanese). Futabasha. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  18. ^ http://www.jpf.go.jp/JF_Contents/GetImage/img_pdf/jbn63.pdf?ContentNo=9&SubsystemNo=1&FileName=img_pdf/jbn63.pdf
  19. ^ "2009 Japan Media Arts Festival Manga Division Excellence Prize konosekai no katasumi ni". Japan Media Arts Festival. Retrieved 23 February 2010. 

External links[edit]