Funeral biscuits

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Funeral biscuits were a type of biscuit traditionally served at funerals in England and North America.

The Gentleman's Magazine described funeral biscuits in 1790.[1] The writer described them as "a kind of sugared biscuit, which are wrapped up, generally two of them together, in a sheet of wax paper, sealed with black wax". The biscuits were given to each person attending the funeral, and were a custom of the funerals of "lower and the middling class of people".[1]

In early North America the biscuits were stamped with a winged head or cherub, or an hourglass or skull.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gentleman's Magazine and Historical Review. 1790. pp. 118–. 
  2. ^ Jacqueline S. Thursby (1 January 2006). Funeral Festivals in America: Rituals for the Living. University Press of Kentucky. pp. 84–. ISBN 978-0-8131-7183-8.