Gülbahar Hatun

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Gülbahar Hatun
Born Ayşe
c. 1447
Trabzon
Died c. 1510
Trabzon
Resting place
Gülbahar Hatun Camii, Trabzon
Religion Islam
Spouse(s) Bayezid II
Parents The daughter of Abd-us-Samed

Gülbahar Hatun[1] (Ottoman Turkish: گلبهار خاتون; c. 1447 – c. 1510) was one of the wives of Ottoman Sultan Bayezid II. She was married to Bayezid in 1469 at Amasya. Little is known of her family background, apart from the fact that an Ottoman inscription (vakfiye) describes her as Hātun binti Abd-us-Samed (Daughter of Abd-us-Samed), which supports the widespread view that her father was a Pontic Greek who had "turned Turk", that is converted to Islam and joined the Turkish Millet. Abd-us-Samed, meaning Servant of God, was the anonym that was applied to many Balkan and Anatolian Christians who converted to Islam in the classical Ottoman period. Gülbahar hatun's son, Selim became Ottoman Sultan as Selim I, although she herself never became recognised as a Valide Sultan because she died before his accession to the sultanate.

Some sources have suggested that Gülbahar Hatun was the mother of Selim I however chronological analysis suggests that this is highly improbable[2] and that his biological mother was in fact Ayşe Hatun, the first wife of Bayezid II and the daughter of Alaüddevle Bozkurt Bey, the eleventh ruler of the Dulkadirids centered around Elbistan in Kahramanmaraş.[3][4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yavuz Bahadıroğlu, Resimli Osmanlı Tarihi, Nesil Yayınları (Ottoman History with Illustrations, Nesil Publications), 15th Ed., 2009, page 157, ISBN 978-975-269-299-2
  2. ^ Dijkema, F.TH (1977), The Ottoman Historical Monumental Inscriptions in Edirne, BRILL, p. 32, ISBN 9004050620 
  3. ^ Babinger, Franz (1992), Mehmed the Conqueror and His Time, Princeton University Press, p. 57, ISBN 0691010781 
  4. ^ Freely, John (2001), Inside the Seraglio: private lives of the sultans in Istanbul, Penguin, p. 32, ISBN 0140270566 
  5. ^ Agoston, Gabor (2011), "The Ottomans: From Frontier Principality to Empire", in Olsen, John Andreas; Gray, Colin S., The Practice of Strategy: From Alexander the Great to the Present, Oxford University Press, p. 116, ISBN 0140270566 

See also[edit]