G. M. Young

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George Malcolm Young (1882 in Greenhithe, Kent – 1959) was an English historian, most famous for his long essay on Victorian times in England, Portrait of an Age (1936).

Biography[edit]

Young was educated at St Paul's School and Balliol College, Oxford. In 1905 he was elected a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. From 1908 to 1920 he was employed as a civil servant, initially with the Board of Education and from 1917 with the Ministry of Reconstruction. For many years he was a trustee of the National Portrait Gallery and the British Museum.

Portrait of an Age was an expanded version of the 89-page conclusion to Early Victorian England, a two-volume collection which Young had edited in 1934.[1] Simon Schama has described it as "An immortal classic, the greatest long essay ever written."[citation needed]

Works[edit]

  • Gibbon, 1932
  • (ed.) Early Victorian England, 1830-1865. 2 vols, 1934.
  • Charles I and Cromwell: An Essay, 1935
  • Portrait of an Age, 1936
  • Daylight and Champaign: essays, 1937
  • The Government of Britain, 1941
  • Burke, 1943
  • Today and Yesterday: Collected Essays and Addresses, 1948
  • Last Essays, 1950
  • Stanley Baldwin, 1952
  • Mr Gladstone
  • Rights and Duties in the Modern State
  • Scott and History
  • The Good Society

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Peter Stansky, Review of George Kitson Clark (ed.), Portrait of an Age, 1977 annotated edition, The American Historical Review (1979), pp. 165-6

External links[edit]