G. T. Boag

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Sir
George Townsend Boag
KCIE CSI
Diwan of Cochin
In office
1943–1944
Preceded by A. F. W. Dickinson
Succeeded by C. P. Karunakara Menon
Member of the Advisory Council of the Governor of Madras
In office
1939–1943
Governor John Erskine, Lord Erskine,
Arthur Hope, 2nd Baron Rankeillour
Governor of Odisha (acting)
In office
August 11, 1938 – December 8, 1938
Premier Biswanath Das
Preceded by John Austen Hubback
Succeeded by John Austen Hubback
Chief Secretary of Madras Presidency
In office
1925–1928
Governor George Goschen, 2nd Viscount Goschen
Municipal Commissioner of Madras
In office
1923–1925
Personal details
Born 1884
Died 1969 (age 85)
United Kingdom
Nationality British
Religion Christian

Sir George Townsend Boag KCIE CSI (1884–1969) was a British Indian civil servant, statistician and administrator who served as the Acting Governor of Odisha from August 11, 1938 to December 8, 1938.

Early life[edit]

George Townsend Boag was born on November 12, 1884 to Rev. George Boag, the Vicar of Winster in Westmorland.[1] He gained admission to Westminster School on January 21, 1897[1] and studied at the school from 1897 to 1903.[2] He was a Mure Scholar for the year 1901.[1] He obtained his baccalaureate and master's degrees from the University of Cambridge.[2] In 1907, he passed the Indian Civil Service examinations and was allotted to the Madras Presidency.[3]

In India[edit]

Madras Presidency[edit]

Boag arrived in India in 1908 and served as a special settlement officer from 1912 to 1918.[3] He was appointed to the Indian Nutrition Board and served as the Collector of Transtuffs from 1912 to 1918.[3] From 1920 to 1922, Boag served as Superintendent of Census Operations for the Presidency succeeding J. C. Molony.[3] Boag served as the Municipal Commissioner for Madras from 1923 to 1925.[3] He was the Chief Secretary of Madras Presidency from 1925 to 1928 and 1934 to 1938.[4] Boag served as the District Collector of West Godavari in 1930 [4] before being appointed the Superintendent of the Madras Presidency Archives succeeding A. V. Venkatarama Ayyar on August 19, 1930.[5] Boag served as a member of the Indian Tariff Board from 1931 to 1933.[4]

Odisha[edit]

On August 11, 1938, the Governor of Odisha, Sir John Austen Hubback proceeded on a leave.[6] Boag was appointed Acting Governor of Odisha in his stead and served from August 11, 1938 to December 8, 1938.[7] As the Acting Governor of Odisha, he inaugurated the opening session of the Odisha Legislative Assembly on August 29, 1938.[8]

On September 12, 1938, severe agitations broke out in the princely state of Dhenkanal demanding the abolition of stringent taxes.[9] The situation turned violent as the agitations intensified.[9] The Eastern States Agency, a federation of princely states of which Dhenkanal formed a part, resorted to police action.[9] Large scale arrests were carried out and there was police firing in some areas.[9] As a result of the disturbances in the neighbouring Dhenkanal, a large number of refugees poured into Odisha.[10] Boag kept the Viceroy of India regularly updated with the events at Dhenkanal.[10] The influx of refugees reached such alarming proportions that refugee camps had to be established along the border towns.[11]

On December 8, 1938, Sir John Austen Hubback returned from leave and resumed his duties as Governor of Odisha. Boag was transferred back to Madras Presidency where he served as a member of the Special Advisory Council during Governor's rule and was given charge of the public, finance and revenue departments.[12] He served in the Council from 1939 to 1943.[13] On 1943, he was appointed Diwan of Cochin and served from 1943 to 1944.[13][14]

Honours[edit]

George Townsend Boag was made a Companion of the Indian Empire in 1928 and a Companion of the Star of India in 1936.[2] He was made a Knight Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire in 1941.[2]

Boag's residence[edit]

Boag's official residence in Madras city was located at T. Nagar.[15] The street in which it was situated was named Boag Road in his honour. The house was later purchased by Kurma Venkata Reddy Naidu.[15] In 1959, it was bought by Tamil film actor Sivaji Ganesan who renamed it Annai Illam.[15] Today, the house is owned by the actor's family who continue to reside here.[15]

Works[edit]

  • George Townsend Boag (1933). The Madras Presidency, 1881-1931. Government Press. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c George Fisher Russell Barker, Alan Herbert Stenning, Geoffrey Reynolds Yonge Radcliffe, John Beach Whitmore, David Crighton Simpson (1928). The record of old Westminsters: a biographical list of all those who are known to have been educated at Westminster school from the earliest times to 1927. Chiswick press. p. 100. 
  2. ^ a b c d The Times of India directory and year book including who's who. Bennett, Coleman. 1948. p. 1150. 
  3. ^ a b c d e M. Sundararaj (1999). A manual of archival systems and the world of archives. Siva Publications. p. 225. 
  4. ^ a b c Who's who in India, Burma & Ceylon. Who's Who Publishers (India) Ltd. 1941. p. 114. 
  5. ^ M. Sundararaj (1999). A manual of archival systems and the world of archives. Siva Publications. p. 254. 
  6. ^ B. B. Jena (1980). Odisha, People, Culture, and Polity: People, Culture and Polity. Kalyani Publications. p. 261. 
  7. ^ "Provinces of British India: Odisha". World Statesmen. 
  8. ^ G. A. Natesan (1938). The Indian Review. G. A. NAtesan & Co. p. 616. 
  9. ^ a b c d D. P. (Debi Prasad) Mishra (1998). People's revolt in Odisha: a study of Talcher. Atlantic Publishers & Distributors. p. 31. ISBN 81-7156-739-8. ISBN 978-81-7156-739-3. 
  10. ^ a b D. P. (Debi Prasad) Mishra (1998). People's revolt in Odisha: a study of Talcher. Atlantic Publishers & Distributors. p. 32. ISBN 81-7156-739-8. ISBN 978-81-7156-739-3. 
  11. ^ D. P. (Debi Prasad) Mishra (1998). People's revolt in Odisha: a study of Talcher. Atlantic Publishers & Distributors. p. 33. ISBN 81-7156-739-8. ISBN 978-81-7156-739-3. 
  12. ^ Who's who in India, Burma & Ceylon. Who's Who Publishers (India) Ltd. 1941. p. 9. 
  13. ^ a b India Office Library and Records (1983). Portraits in the India Office Library and Records. British Library. p. 22. ISBN 0-7123-0015-5. ISBN 978-0-7123-0015-5. 
  14. ^ "Indian Princely States, Cochin - Dewans". World Statesmen. 
  15. ^ a b c d V. Sriram (November 2008). "Historic Residences in Chennai-2". Madras Musings 18 (11). 
Preceded by
Collector of Transtuffs (Indian Nutrition Board)
1912-1918
Succeeded by
Preceded by
J. C. Molony
Superintendent of Census Operations for the Madras Presidency
1921-22
Succeeded by
M. W. M. Yeats
Preceded by
Municipal Commissioner of Madras city
1923-1925
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Chief Secretary of Madras Presidency
1925-1928
Succeeded by
A. Y. G. Campbell
Preceded by
John Austen Hubback
Governor of Odisha (acting)
August 11, 1938 - December 8, 1938
Succeeded by
John Austen Hubback
Preceded by
Member of Governor of Madras Advisory Council
1939-1943
Succeeded by
Preceded by
A. F. W. Dickinson
Diwan of Cochin
1943-1944
Succeeded by
C. P. Karunakara Menon