GER Class D27

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GER Class D27
GER 2-2-2 Class D27 No1000.jpg
GER 1000, the first of the 1893 batch
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer James Holden
Builder Stratford Works
Build date 1889–1893
Total produced 21
Specifications
Configuration 2-2-2
UIC classification 1A1 n2
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Leading wheel
diameter
4 ft 0 in (1.219 m)
Driver diameter 7 ft 0 in (2.134 m)
Trailing wheel
diameter
4 ft 0 in (1.219 m)
Wheelbase 36 ft 7 in (11.15 m)
Length 48 ft 2 in (14.68 m) over buffers
Weight on drivers 17 long tons 10 cwt (39,200 lb or 17.8 t)
Locomotive weight 40 long tons 3.5 cwt (90,000 lb or 40.8 t)
Fuel type Coal, some fuel oil
Boiler pressure 140 lbf/in2 (965 kPa) later 160 lbf/in2 (1,103 kPa)
Firegrate area 18.0 sq ft (1.67 m2)
Heating surface:
– Total
1,199.5 sq ft (111.44 m2)
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size 18 in × 24 in (460 mm × 610 mm), later 18 in × 24 in (460 mm × 610 mm)
Performance figures
Tractive effort 11,016 lbf (49.00 kN), later 13,114 lbf (58.33 kN)
Career
Operator(s) Great Eastern Railway
Class D27
Scrapped 1901–1907

The GER Class D27 was a class of 2-2-2 steam tender locomotives designed by James Holden for the Great Eastern Railway.

History[edit]

In 1888 Holden experimented by removing the side rods of T19 No. 721 to form a 2-2-2.[1] In 1889 the first of a new class appeared: initially No. 740 (later 789 and 780) which had been built on a 'Locomotive and Machinery' account. This was followed by two batches of ten on the more normal 'Letter' account.[2] in 1893. They were built with 18-by-24-inch (457 mm × 610 mm)[3] inside cylinders powered by a 140-pound-force-per-square-inch (965 kPa) boiler. They were later rebuilt with 18-by-25-inch (457 mm × 635 mm) and 160-pound-force-per-square-inch (1,103 kPa) boilers.[2]

Table of orders and numbers[2]
Year Order no. Manufacturer Quantity GER Nos. Notes
1889 LM68 Stratford Works 1 740 Renumbered 789, then 780
1891 D27 Stratford Works 10 770–779
1893 F32 Stratford Works 10 1000–1009

One of their main spheres was on the Joint Line working expresses to York. In 1896 the class inaugurated the epic making non-stop run to North Walsham using oil-firing. Rous-Martin[4] found that the singles climbed Brentwood Bank more rapidly than the 2-4-0s. See also Ahrons (1951).

Nine locomotives were withdrawn between 1901 and 1903. The surviving eight locomotives in the 770-series were transferred to the duplicate list in July 1904, and had their number prefixed with a "0". The remaining fourteen were withdrawn between 1904 and 1907.[5]

Table of withdrawals[5]
Year Quantity in
service at
start of year
Quantity
withdrawn
Locomotive numbers
1901 21 4 1000, 1002, 1005, 1007
1902 17 3 773, 1001, 1003
1903 14 2 1008, 1009
1904 12 4 775, 0771, 1004, 1006
1905 8 4 0772, 0774, 0777, 0780
1906 4 1 0770
1907 3 3 0776, 0778, 0779

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allen 1961, p. 114
  2. ^ a b c Aldrich 1969, p. 34
  3. ^ Rous-Marten 1902, p. 272
  4. ^ Rous-Marten 1898a
  5. ^ a b Aldrich 1969, p. 35
  • Ahrons, E. L. (1951). Asher, L. L., ed. Locomotive and train working in the latter part of the nineteenth century. (Volume 1). Cambridge: Heffer. 
  • Aldrich, C. Langley (1969). The Locomotives of the Great Eastern Railway 1862–1962 (7th ed.). Wickford, Essex: C. Langley Aldrich. OCLC 30278831. 
  • Allen, C. J. (1961). The Great Eastern Railway, 3rd edition (3rd ed.). London: Ian Allan. 
  • Rous-Marten, C. (1898a). British express engines. Int. Rly Congress. 
  • Rous-Marten, C. (1902). Railway Magazine 11: 272. 

External links[edit]