GER Class S56

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GER Class S56 (and R24 rebuilt)
LNER Class J69
Stratford Locomotive Depot geograph-2380127-by-Ben-Brooksbank.jpg
LNER 8625 (ex-7059, exx-GER 59) at Stratford locomotive depot, 28 September 1946
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer James Holden
Builder Stratford Works
Build date 1904 (new)
Total produced 20 (new)
Rebuild date 1902–1921 from Class R24
Specifications
Configuration 0-6-0T
UIC classification C n2t
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Driver diameter 4 ft 0 in (1.219 m)
Wheelbase 13 ft 10 in (4.22 m)
Length 27 ft 8 in (8.43 m)
Locomotive weight 42 long tons 9 cwt (95,100 lb or 43.1 t)
Fuel type Coal
Fuel capacity 2 long tons 10 cwt (5,600 lb or 2.5 t)
Water capacity 1,200 imp gal (5,460 l; 1,440 US gal)
Boiler pressure 180 psi (1.24 MPa)
Firegrate area 14.5 sq ft (1.35 m2)
Heating surface:
– Total
996.17 sq ft (92.547 m2)
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size 16.5 in × 22 in (419 mm × 559 mm)
Performance figures
Tractive effort 19,091 lbf (84.92 kN)
Career
Operator(s) GER » London and North Eastern Railway » BR
Class GER: S56 or R24R
LNER: J69
Power class BR: 2F
Nicknames Bucks, Buckjumpers
Axle load class LNER/BR: RA 3
Retired 1940–1962
Disposition One preserved, remainder scrapped

The GER Class S56 was a class of 0-6-0T steam tank locomotives designed by James Holden for the Great Eastern Railway. Together with some rebuilt examples of GER Class R24, they passed to the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping in 1923, and received the LNER classification J69.

History[edit]

The Class S56 were a development of the Class R24, being almost identical, apart from higher boiler pressure and larger water tanks. Twenty were built in 1904 at Stratford Works.

Table of orders and numbers[1]
Year Order No. Quantity GER Nos. LNER Nos. 1946 Nos. Notes
1904 S56 10 51–60 7051–7060 8617–19, —, 8621, —, 8623, —, 8625–8626
1904 P57 10 81–90 7081–7090 —, 8628–8633, —, 8635–8636

All twenty passed to the LNER in 1923. Thirteen class J69 locomotives were lent to the War Department in October 1939,[2] of which five had been built as Class S56. They were sold to the War Department in October 1940,[3] where they were used on the Melbourne and Longmoor Military Railways.[2] The remaining locomotives were renumbered 8617–8636 in order of construction; however gaps were left where the locomotives sold to the War Department would have been. At nationalisation in 1948, the remainder passed to British Railways, who added 60000 to their number. Post-war withdrawals started in 1958, and by 1962 all had been retired.[4]

Table of withdrawals of S56-built locomotives[3][4]
Year Quantity in
service at
start of year
Quantity
withdrawn
Locomotives numbers Notes
1940 20 5 7054, 7056, 7058, 7081, 7088 to WD 86, 87, 83, 80, 91
1958 15 5 68617, 68618, 68628, 68631, 68632
1959 10 4 68625, 68629, 68630, 68636
1960 6 1 68633
1961 5 2 68619, 68623
1962 3 3 68621, 68626, 68635

Preservation[edit]

GER no. 87 (LNER 7087, 8633, BR 68633) has been preserved, initially at the Clapham Transport Museum,[5] and now at the National Railway Museum. It is currently on display at Bressingham Steam Museum.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Aldrich 1969, p. 102
  2. ^ a b Tourret 1995, p. 47
  3. ^ a b Aldrich 1969, p. 103
  4. ^ a b Aldrich 1969, pp. 124–125
  5. ^ Aldrich 1969, p. 104
  • Aldrich, C. Langley (1969). The Locomotives of the Great Eastern Railway 1862–1962 (7th ed.). Wickford, Essex: C. Langley Aldrich. OCLC 30278831. 
  • Tourret, R. (1995). Allied Military Locomotives of the Second World War. Abingdon, Oxon: Tourret Publishing. ISBN 0-905878-06-X. 
  • Ian Allan ABC of British Railways Locomotives, 1948 edition, part 4, pp 49–50

External links[edit]