G 9-38

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GJ 1116
Astrometry
Parallax (π) 191.3 ± 2.5[1] mas
Distance 17.0 ± 0.2 ly
(5.23 ± 0.07 pc)
Other designations
The system:
EI Cnc
G 9-38
G 47-14
G 41-11
LTT 12343
LDS 3836
LP 426-40
GJ 1116[1]
PLX 2144.03[2]
WDS J08582+1945AB
GSC 01397-01138
2MASS J08581519+1945470
A:
NLTT 20638[3]
LHS 2076[4]
B:
NLTT 20637[5]
LHS 2077[6]
Database references
SIMBAD The system
A
B

G 9-38, also known as EI Cancri and GJ 1116, is a binary star system consisting of two M-type stars.[7] At 17.04 light-years from the Sun, the system is relatively nearby.[8]

Distance[edit]

G 9-38 distance estimates

Source Parallax, mas Distance, pc Distance, ly Ref.
Gliese & Jahreiß (1991) 191.3 ± 2.5 5.23 ± 0.07 17.05+0.23
−0.22
[1]
van Altena et al. (1995) 191.2 ± 2.5 5.23 ± 0.07 17.06+0.23
−0.22
[2]
RECONS TOP100 (2012) 191.2 ± 2.5[nb 1] 5.23 ± 0.07 17.06+0.23
−0.22
[9]

Non-trigonometric distance estimates are marked in italic. The best estimate is marked in bold.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Gliese, W. and Jahreiß, H. (1991). "GJ 1116". Preliminary Version of the Third Catalogue of Nearby Stars. Retrieved 2014-11-23. 
  2. ^ a b Van Altena W. F., Lee J. T., Hoffleit E. D. (1995). "GCTP 2144.03". The General Catalogue of Trigonometric Stellar Parallaxes, Fourth Edition. Retrieved 2014-11-23. 
  3. ^ Luyten, Willem Jacob (1979). "NLTT 20638". NLTT Catalogue. 
  4. ^ Luyten, Willem Jacob (1979). "LHS 2076". LHS Catalogue, 2nd Edition. 
  5. ^ Luyten, Willem Jacob (1979). "NLTT 20637". NLTT Catalogue. 
  6. ^ Luyten, Willem Jacob (1979). "LHS 2077". LHS Catalogue, 2nd Edition. 
  7. ^ Vizier query: Name=G* 1116, Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg , accessed 30 December 2012.
  8. ^ Nearby Stars Catalog (NSC), Planetary Habitability Laboratory, University of Puerto Rico at Aerecibo accessed 31 December 2012.
  9. ^ "RECONS TOP100". THE ONE HUNDRED NEAREST STAR SYSTEMS brought to you by RECONS (Research Consortium On Nearby Stars). 2012. Retrieved 2014-11-23. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Parallax from van Altena et al. (1995).