GURPS Discworld

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GURPS Discworld
DiscworldRPGCover.jpg
Discworld Roleplaying Game rulebook cover, art by Paul Kidby
Designer(s) Phil Masters
Publisher(s) Steve Jackson Games
Publication date

1998 (GURPS Discworld)

2002 (Discworld Role-Playing Game)
Genre(s) Comedic Fantasy
System(s) GURPS Lite

GURPS Discworld and the related supplements are role-playing game sourcebooks set in Terry Pratchett's Discworld fantasy universe using the GURPS role-playing game system.

Contents[edit]

The game included a lot of detail about Discworld, appealing to both roleplaying and Discworld fans.[1] It has also been attributed to introducing roleplayers to the series of Discworld books.[2][3][4]

Publication history[edit]

GURPS Discworld was written by Phil Masters and Terry Pratchett. Cover and illustrations were done by Paul Kidby. It was published by Steve Jackson Games in 1998.[5] GURPS Discworld was the first book to include GURPS Lite in it.[6] The GURPS Lite rules were included as an appendix, meaning it was not necessary to purchase GURPS Basic in order to play.[7]

In March 2001, Steve Jackson Games published a sequel under the title GURPS Discworld Also.[8] It was written by Phil Masters, again with the assistance of Terry Pratchett. Cover and illustrations were done by Sean Murray.[9] The supplement covered recent events in the book series,[10] including details about the Unseen University.[11] Among the scenarios included is EckEckEcksEcksian Cart Wars, based on the Mad Max parody segments of The Last Continent and Steve Jackson Games' own Car Wars and GURPS Autoduel setting.[10] It also included the first detailed rules for mechanical semaphore telegraphy, based on the "clacks" network in the books.[12]

The original book was republished in 2002 by Steve Jackson Games with the GURPS Lite rules integrated throughout the text. The title was changed from GURPS Discworld to Discworld Roleplaying Game to reinforce its stand-alone capabilities.[13] Illustrations were once again done by Paul Kidby.[13] Later publications, including the second edition of Discworld, were labelled "Powered by GURPS" without including "GURPS" in the book title, primarily to make it easier for fans to find the books at mass-market retailers.[6]

Reception[edit]

Books[edit]

  • GURPS Discworld (1998), Steve Jackson Games
  • GURPS Discworld Also (2001), Steve Jackson Games
  • Discworld Role-Playing Game (2002), Steve Jackson Games

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Higgins, Dave (1974). Ramtop to Rimfall. Discworld Newsletter. 
  2. ^ Hite, Kenneth (1998-09-11). Review of GURPS Discworld. MANIA Magazine. 
  3. ^ Weiss, Phillip. "What people are saying about GURPS Discworld". Retrieved 2007-09-15. 
  4. ^ Lindsay-Levine, Sam. "RPGnet review of GURPS Discworld". RPGnet. Retrieved 2007-09-15. [dead link]
  5. ^ Masters, Phil; Pratchett, Terry (1998). GURPS Discworld. Steve Jackson Games. 
  6. ^ a b Shannon Appelcline (2011). Designers & Dragons. Mongoose Publishing. p. 111. ISBN 978-1-907702-58-7. 
  7. ^ Review of GURPS Discworld. InQuest Gamer (February 1999). 
  8. ^ "GURPS Discworld Also (Steve Jackson Games)". Warehouse 23. Retrieved 2007-09-15. 
  9. ^ Masters, Paul; Pratchett, Terry (2001). GURPS Discworld Also. Steve Jackson Games. ISBN 1-55634-447-3. 
  10. ^ a b Robert A. Rodger (2001-07-05). "GURPS Discworld Also". RPGnet. Retrieved 2007-09-15. 
  11. ^ "Discworld Also". Steve Jackson Games. Retrieved 2007-09-15. 
  12. ^ Phil Masters (2001-12-15). "GURPS Discworld Also". RPGnet. Retrieved 2007-09-15. 
  13. ^ a b Masters, Paul; Pratchett, Terry (2002). Discworld Roleplaying Game. Steve Jackson Games. ISBN 1-55634-687-5.