GWR 1016 Class

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GWR 1016 Class
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer George Armstrong
Builder Wolverhampton, GWR[1]
Order number Lots: B, C, J, K, L[1]
Serial number Works Nos: 47–70, 131–66[1]
Build date 1867 (1867)–71[1]
Total produced 60[1]
Specifications
Configuration 0-6-0ST[1]
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Driver diameter 4 ft 6 in (1.372 m)[1]
Wheelbase 7 ft 4 in (2.24 m) + 8 ft 2 in (2.49 m), total 15 ft 6 in (4.72 m)[1]
Frame
  • Type: Double
  • Length: 26 ft 8 12 in (8.14 m)[2]
Axle load 13 long tons 0 cwt (29,100 lb or 13.2 t) full[1]
Locomotive weight 37 long tons 0 cwt (82,900 lb or 37.6 t) full[1]
Fuel type Coal
Water capacity 880 imp gal (4,000 l; 1,060 US gal)[1]
Boiler
  • Barrel: 11 ft 0 in (3.35 m)
  • Outside diameter: 4 ft 7 78 in (1.419 m)[1]
Boiler pressure 140 lbf/in2 (0.97 MPa)[1]
Firegrate area 16.25 sq ft (1.510 m2)[1]
Heating surface:
– Tubes
1,045.25 sq ft (97.107 m2)[1]
– Firebox 91.75 sq ft (8.524 m2)[1]
– Total 1,137.0 sq ft (105.63 m2)[1]
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size
  • Diameter: 16 in (406 mm)
  • Stroke: 24 in (610 mm)[1]
Performance figures
Tractive effort 13,540 lbf (60.23 kN)[1]
Locomotive brake Wooden blocks[a]
Career
Operator(s) GWR
Class GWR 1016
Number(s) 1016–75[1]
Locale GWR Northern and Southern divisions[1]
Withdrawn 1910 (1910)–35[4]
Disposition All scrapped[1]

The 1016 Class consisted of sixty double framed 0-6-0 saddle tank locomotives designed by George Armstrong and built at the Wolverhampton Works of the Great Western Railway between 1867 and 1871. Like the earlier 302 Class of Joseph Armstrong, the 1016s had 4'6" wheels and a 15'6" wheelbase, dimensions that would remain traditional for the larger GWR pannier tanks right through to Charles Collett's 5700 Class, and with little change to Frederick Hawksworth's 9400 Class of 1947.

The 1016 Class consisted of 60 engines and was built in five lots:

  • Nos. 1016–1027 (Lot B, 1867)
  • Nos. 1028–1039 (Lot C, 1867-8)
  • Nos. 1040–1051 (Lot J, 1870)
  • Nos. 1052–1063 (Lot K, 1870-1)
  • Nos. 1064–1075 (Lot L, 1871)

The class originally had very short saddle tanks. They were a Wolverhampton version of the Standard Goods class, which they resembled below the running plate. Between 1879 and 1895 the 16' × 24" cylinders were mostly enlarged to 17", and the wheels enlarged to 4'712" by means of thicker tyres. Most reboilering was done at Swindon rather than Wolverhampton, and with new boilers new, full-length tanks were fitted. From 1911 all but 11 of the class were rebuilt with pannier tanks, at the time that Belpaire fireboxes were fitted. After 1922 heavier boilers were used, and pressure increased. Many had new bunkers, of both Swindon and Wolverhampton design.

These engines were distributed between the Northern and southern Divisions of the GWR. Apart from four scrapped before 1914 all ran well over a million miles; No. 1047, aged 65, was the last survivor, in summer 1935.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ GWR ended the use of wooden blocks in the 1870s when cast iron blocks with steam brakes were introduced.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v le Fleming 1958, p. E15.
  2. ^ le Fleming 1958, p. E5.
  3. ^ le Fleming 1958, p. E11.
  4. ^ le Fleming 1958, pp. E17-E19.
  5. ^ le Fleming 1958, pp. E15-E19.

Sources[edit]

  • Jones, Robin (2014). Great Western Railway Pannier Tanks (1 ed.). Marlborough, UK: The Crowood Press. ISBN 978-1-84797-653-6. 
  • le Fleming, H.M. (1958). The Locomotives of the Great Western Railway, part five: Six-coupled Tank Engines. Kenilworth: RCTS. ISBN 0-901115-35-5. OCLC 500544510. 

External links[edit]