GWR 3200 Class

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GWR 3200 class
BLUEBELL1.JPG
Preserved GWR 9017 Earl of Berkeley at Horsted Keynes railway station
Specifications
Power type Steam
Designer Charles Collett (rebuild)
Rebuilder GWR Swindon Works
Rebuild date 1936–1939
Number rebuilt 30
Configuration 4-4-0
UIC classification 2'B h
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Leading wheel
diameter
3 ft 8 in (1.118 m)
Driver diameter 5 ft 8 in (1.727 m)
Minimum curve 6 chains (400 ft; 120 m) normal,
5 chains (330 ft; 100 m) slow
Length 56 ft 2 14 in (17.13 m)
Width 8 ft 9 12 in (2.68 m)
Height 12 ft 10 in (3.91 m)
Axle load 15 tons 8 cwt (34,500 lb or 15.6 t) full
Weight on drivers 30 tons 8 cwt (68,100 lb or 30.9 t) full
Locomotive weight 49 tons 0 cwt (109,800 lb or 49.8 t) full
Tender weight 40 tons 0 cwt (89,600 lb or 40.6 t) full
Fuel type Coal
Fuel capacity 6 tons 0 cwt (13,400 lb or 6.1 t) full
Water capacity 3,500 imp gal (16,000 l; 4,200 US gal)
Boiler pressure 180 lbf/in2 (1.24 MPa)
Firegrate area 17.0 sq ft (1.58 m2)
Heating surface:
– Tubes
1,001.0 sq ft (93.00 m2)
– Firebox 108.0 sq ft (10.03 m2)
Superheater area 81.2 sq ft (7.54 m2)
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size 18 in × 26 in (460 mm × 660 mm)
Valve gear Stephenson
Valve type Slide valves
Tractive effort 18,955 lbf (84.32 kN)
Career
Operator(s) GWR » BR
Power class GWR: B,
BR: 2P
Number(s) 3265, 3200–3228; renumbered 9065, 9000–9028
Nicknames Dukedog
Axle load class Yellow
Withdrawn 1948–1960
Preserved 9017
Disposition One preserved, remainder scrapped

The Great Western Railway 3200 Class (or 'Earl' Class) was a design of 4-4-0 steam locomotive for passenger train work. The nickname for this class was Dukedog since the locomotives were composed of former Duke Class boilers on Bulldog Class frames. As such they were one of the last steam locomotive classes to retain outside frames.

Background[edit]

The GWR absorbed the Cambrian Railways in 1923, but with the Cambrian main line being lightly built, permanent way restrictions debarred the use of heavier locomotives, meaning that only a few classes of GWR locomotive were allowed to run over it.[1] The result was the extension of the life of the Duke class locomotives, which had been built from 1895 at Swindon Works for express work in Cornwall. However, by the 1930s many of the Duke class were becoming uneconomical to repair, particularly with regard to the curved outside frames, which were weaker than the later straight-topped version.[2]

Construction[edit]

In December 1929, Duke No.3265 Tre Pol and Pen was withdrawn, and the cylinders and motion, together with a spare Duke boiler and smokebox, were fitted to the straight-topped frames and cab of Bulldog no. 3365 Charles Grey Mott. The rebuilt locomotive retained the name and number of the Duke. The reduction in axle weight, as compared to the Bulldogs, allowed for working over the Cambrian section.[1]

From 1936 a further twenty-nine of the Dukes were withdrawn and replaced by Bulldogs fitted with Duke boilers and motion, reclassified as GWR 3200 "Earl" Class locomotives.[3] The onset of World War II brought a halt to the program, the last replacement being in November 1939, leaving ten Dukes to pass into British Railways ownership. These were scrapped between June 1949 and July 1951, the last survivor being No. 9089, formerly no. 3289 St Austell of July 1899.[4]

Naming[edit]

The first prototype conversion retained its Duke number and name (3265 Tre Pol and Pen), but the others took new numbers in the 32xx series (3200-3228). The conversions were to have carried the original Duke Class names, but a decision was taken to name the class after living Earls who had some connection with the GWR.

Apparently, as a riposte to repeated requests from aristocratic GWR directors for engines to be named after them, the CME of Great Western, Charles Collett decided that these hotch-potch engines, with their decidedly old-fashioned Victorian appearance, should be given the names of those directors. When the directors assembled at Paddington Station for the unveiling of the "new" class, the group were not impressed at Collett's joke.[5]

Hence, the first batch of twenty were allocated names, but, following the construction and naming of no. 3212 Earl of Eldon in May 1937, the nameplates were removed and the names given to nos. 5043-5062 of the express Castle class instead.[6] All these locomotives were renumbered 90xx in 1946 upon delivery of new 2251 Class engines.

Operations[edit]

Mainly allocated to the Cambrian main line, it remained one of the few classes of locomotive that British Rail inherited (others were the GWR 2251 Class and the LMS Ivatt Class 2 2-6-0), that was light enough to be permitted on the wooden Barmouth Bridge. As a result, they remained in regular use until the 1950s.[7]

Preservation[edit]

GWR 9017 in early British Railways livery, departing from Sheffield Park on the Bluebell Line, 18 October 2009

One locomotive, No. 9017 Earl of Berkeley, survives in preservation at the Bluebell Railway. It is currently on static display at Sheffield Park shed, awaiting overhaul after being withdrawn with boiler failures in June 2011 just 2 years before the expiry of her boiler ticket in 2013

Numbering[edit]

NB: In the table below, names in parentheses were allocated but never actually carried in GWR/BR service.

Numbers Rebuilt from Name
3265 / 9065 3265 & 3365 Tre Pol and Pen
3200 / 9000 3288 & 3422 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe
3201 / 9001 3263 & 3412 Earl of Dunraven
3202 / 9002 3286 & 3416 Earl of Dudley
3203 / 9003 3275 & 3424 Earl Cawdor
3204 / 9004 3271 & 3439 Earl of Dartmouth
3205 / 9005 3255 & 3413 Earl of Devon
3206 / 9006 3267 & 3428 Earl of Plymouth
3207 / 9007 3274 & 3410 Earl of St. Germans
3208 / 9008 3285 & 3403 Earl Bathurst
3209 / 9009 3277 & 3392 Earl of Radnor
3210 / 9010 3269 & 3402 Earl Cairns
3211 / 9011 3281 & 3415 Earl of Ducie
3212 / 9012 3261 & 3405 Earl of Eldon
3213 / 9013 3257 & 3374 (Earl of Powis)
3214 / 9014 3252 & 3434 (Earl Waldegrave)
3215 / 9015 3262 & 3420 (Earl of Clancarty)
3216 / 9016 3282 & 3404 (Earl St Aldwyn)
3217 / 9017 3258 & 3425 (Earl of Berkeley)
3218 / 9018 3266 & 3380 (Earl of Birkenhead)
3219 / 9019 3260 & 3427 (Earl of Shaftesbury)
3220 / 9020 3279 & 3414
3221 / 9021 3259 & 3411
3222 / 9022 3278 & 3436
3223 / 9023 3253 & 3423
3224 / 9024 3290 & 3409
3225 / 9025 3268 & 3437
3226 / 9026 3270 & 3390
3227 / 9027 3280 & 3433
3228 / 9028 3256 & 3429

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Nock 1978, p. 74
  2. ^ Nock 1978, p. 73
  3. ^ Nock 1977, p. 30
  4. ^ Nock 1978, p. 75
  5. ^ Charles Collett biography, The Great Western Archive, accessed 3 August 2013
  6. ^ Nock 1978, pp. 74–75
  7. ^ Nock 1978, p. 70

Bibliography[edit]

  • Nock, O.S. (1977). Standard Gauge Great Western 4-4-0s Part 1 Inside Cylinder Classes 1894-1910. Newton Abbot: David & Charles. ISBN 0-7153-7411-7. 
  • Nock, O.S. (1978). Standard Gauge Great Western 4-4-0s Part 2 Counties to the Close 1904-1961. Newton Abbot: David & Charles. ISBN 0-7153-7684-5. 
  • Ian Allan ABC of British Railways Locomotives, winter 1957/8 edition, part 1, page 19
  • Whitehurst, Brian (1973). Great Western engines, names, numbers, types, classes: 1940 to preservation. Oxford: Oxford Publishing Company. pp. 72, 102, 141. ISBN 0-902888-21-8. OCLC 815661. 

External links[edit]