GWR 655 Class

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GWR 655 Class
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer George Armstrong
Builder Wolverhampton, GWR[1]
Order number Lots: A3, B3, E3[1]
Serial number Works Nos: 563–74, 575–94, 605–24[1]
Build date 1892 (1892)–97[1]
Total produced 52[1]
Specifications
Configuration 0-6-0ST[1]
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Driver diameter 4 ft 6 in (1.372 m)[2]
Wheelbase 7 ft 3 in (2.21 m) + 8 ft 4 in (2.54 m), total 15 ft 6 in (4.72 m)[2]
Frame
  • Type: Inside
  • Length: 26 ft 6 in (8.077 m)[3]
Axle load
  • (1741) 13 long tons 18 cwt (31,100 lb or 14.1 t) full[2]
  • (2701) 14 long tons 6 cwt (32,000 lb or 14.5 t) full[2]
Locomotive weight
  • (1741) 41 long tons 4 cwt (92,300 lb or 41.9 t) full[2]
  • (2701) 42 long tons 5 cwt (94,600 lb or 42.9 t) full[2]
Fuel type Coal
Water capacity 1,000 imp gal (4,500 l; 1,200 US gal)[2]
Boiler
  • Barrel: 10 ft 6 in (3.20 m)
  • Outside diameter: 4 ft 2 in (1.27 m)
  • Pitch: 6 ft 4 34 in (1.949 m)[2]
Boiler pressure 140 lbf/in2 (0.97 MPa)[2]
Firegrate area 15.16 sq ft (1.408 m2)[2]
Heating surface:
– Tubes
1,125 sq ft (104.5 m2)[2]
– Firebox 103 sq ft (9.6 m2)[2]
– Total 1,228 sq ft (114.1 m2)[2]
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size
  • Diameter: 17 in (432 mm)
  • Stroke: 24 in (610 mm)[2]
Performance figures
Tractive effort 15,285 lbf (67.99 kN)[2]
Locomotive brake Steam[a]
Career
Operator(s) GWR
Class GWR 655
Number(s) 655, 767, 1741–50, 1771–90, 2701–20[1]
Locale Primarily GWR Northern division[5]
Withdrawn 1928 (1928)–50[6]

Class 655 of the Great Western Railway was a class of 52 0-6-0 saddle tank locomotives designed by George Armstrong and built at the GWR's Wolverhampton Works.

Design and construction[edit]

They were built in three lots between 1892 and 1897:

  • Nos. 655, 767 and 1741-1750 (Lot A3, 1892)
  • Nos. 1771-1790 (Lot B3, 1892-4)
  • Nos. 2701-2720 (Lot E3, 1896-7)

They were in effect a continuation of the 645 Class, with longer frames though using the same 4'6" wheels and 15'6" wheelbase, and they were the last of the larger type of tank engine to be built at Wolverhampton. Pannier tanks were later fitted to all of them, apart from No. 1772, between 1912 and 1930.

Use[edit]

They were nearly all Northern Division engines until the 1920s, though later Weymouth had as many as five. Withdrawal started in 1928, but 21 continued into British Railways ownership. Nos. 1782 and 2719 survived until November 1950. [7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Steam brakes with cast iron blocks became standard in the 1870s.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g le Fleming 1958, p. E40.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o le Fleming 1958, p. E41.
  3. ^ le Fleming 1958, p. E5.
  4. ^ le Fleming 1958, p. E11.
  5. ^ le Fleming 1958, p. E42.
  6. ^ le Fleming 1958, pp. E42-E50.
  7. ^ le Fleming 1958, pp. E33-E35.

Sources[edit]

  • le Fleming, H.M. (1958). The Locomotives of the Great Western Railway, part five: Six-coupled Tank Engines. Kenilworth: RCTS. 

External links[edit]