Gabriel Dover

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Gabriel A. Dover (Gabby Dover) is a British geneticist. He is best known for coining the term molecular drive in 1982 to describe a putative third evolutionary force operating distinctly from natural selection and genetic drift.[1] More generally, his research has been on the evolution of genes and genomes, particularly the complex processes that occur in multigene families such as ribosomal RNA genes. His recent work has focused on development in flies, in particular the co-evolution between the developmental regulatory elements involved in morphogenesis.

His BSc in botany and genetics is from the University of Leeds; his PhD, from the University of Cambridge, is in the field of chromosomal genetics. The majority of his career was spent at the Department of Genetics at the University of Cambridge. In 1992, Dover became a Professor of Genetics at the University of Leicester.[2] He was awarded a Research Fellowship in 1997 and an Emeritus Fellowship in 2002 by the Leverhulme Trust.[3][4]

Dover co-edited the textbook Genome Evolution (Academic Press, 1982) with Richard Flavell. He has also written a popular book on evolution, Dear Mr Darwin: Letters on the Evolution of Life and Human Nature (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2000), framed as an exchange of letters with Charles Darwin from beyond the grave. The book seeks to refute the selfish gene theory promulgated by Richard Dawkins.

Key paper[edit]

  • Dover GA (1982) Molecular drive: A cohesive mode of species evolution. Nature 299: 111–7.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dover GA (1982) Molecular drive: A cohesive mode of species evolution. Nature 299: 111–7.
  2. ^ Dover G. Dear Mr Darwin: Letters on the Evolution of Life and Human Nature (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2000); biographical note, p.4.
  3. ^ Williams L. Fellowships. Times Higher Educational Supplement (24 October 1997) (accessed 21 March 2010).
  4. ^ Awards to Individuals 2002, The Leverhulme Trust (accessed 21 March 2010).