Gabriella Cristiani

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Gabriella Cristiani (born 1949) is an Italian film editor with about twenty feature film credits.[1] She has had a notable collaboration with director Bernardo Bertolucci. Early in her career she assisted editor Franco Arcalli on two of Bertolucci's films, Last Tango in Paris (1972) and 1900 (1976). Arcalli was the "supervising editor" on a 1977 film, Berlinguer, I Love You, that was one of Cristiani's first feature editing credits; the film was directed by Giuseppe Bertolucci - Bernardo's brother. Arcalli was to have edited Bernardo Bertolucci's next film, La Luna (1979), but he died during production; Cristiani, who was assisting, then took over as editor.[2]

Cristiani edited Bernardo Bertolucci's 1982 film Tragedy of a Ridulous Man. She won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing for The Last Emperor (1987), which won a total of 9 Oscars (including Best Picture and Best Director (for Bertolucci)) as well as numerous other honors. Cristiani's work on Bertolucci's next film, The Sheltering Sky (1990), is noted for a technical innovation, which was the "nonlinear" editing of the film using digital techniques.[3] Sheltering Sky was Cristiani's final film with Bertolucci. Cristiani has edited films over the last decade with several different directors, and she herself directed and edited the 1999 film, Ladies Room.

Filmography as editor[edit]

Filmography based primarily on the Internet Movie Database entries.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gabriella Cristiani at the Internet Movie Database
  2. ^ Marrone, Gaetana (2000). The gaze and the labyrinth: the cinema of Liliana Cavani. Princeton University Press. pp. 242–243. ISBN 978-0-691-00873-8. 
  3. ^ Rubin, Michael (2006). Michael Rubin on Non-Linear Editing History: Bertolucci's Sheltering Sky. Interview with Gary-Paul Prince. 

External links[edit]

  • Cristiani, Gabriella; Rice, Robin (May 30, 2007). The Power of Story in Films. Interview with Randall Libero. Spirit of Film: Conversations. Voice of America Talk Radio Network. Retrieved 2010-08-01.  56 minute recording.