Gajim

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Not to be confused with Gaim.
Gajim
framless
Developer(s) Gajim Developers
Initial release May 21, 2004[1]
Stable release 0.15.4 (May 25, 2013; 14 months ago (2013-05-25)) [±]
Preview release SVN
Written in Python
Operating system BSD, GNU/Linux, Microsoft Windows
Available in Multi language[2]
Type Instant messaging client
License GNU GPLv3 only
Website www.gajim.org

Gajim /ɡɛˈʒm/[3] is an instant messaging client for the XMPP protocol which uses the GTK+ toolkit. The name Gajim is a recursive acronym for Gajim's a jabber instant messenger. Gajim runs on GNU/Linux, BSD and Microsoft Windows. Released under the GNU General Public License, Gajim is free software. A 2009 round-up of similar software on Tom's Hardware found version 0.12.1 "the lightest and fastest jabber IM client".[4]

Philosophy and features[edit]

The goal of the Gajim project is to provide a full-featured and easy to use XMPP client for GTK+ users. Gajim uses PyGTK as GUI library, so it does not require full GNOME to run, though it works nicely under a GNOME environment. Some of its features:

  • Tabbed chat windows
  • Group chat support (with MUC protocol)
  • Emoticons, Avatars, File transfer, URL grabber, Bookmarks
  • Systray icon, Speller
  • TLS, OpenPGP and end-to-end encryption support (OpenPGP not available under Windows until version 0.15),[5] including SSL legacy support
  • Transport Registration support
  • Service Discovery including Nodes
  • Wikipedia, dictionary and search engine lookup
  • Multiple accounts support
  • D-Bus Capabilities
  • XML Console
  • Jingle voice and video support[6] (using the "python-farsight" library, no support in Windows yet)

Gajim is available in Basque, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, English, Esperanto, French, German, Italian, Norwegian (Bokmål), Polish, Russian, Spanish, Slovak, Swedish and Ukrainian.[2]

Security[edit]

Despite being written in Python (and thus generally invulnerable to buffer overflow attacks), Gajim has a history of a critical vulnerabilities. Up until late 2011, it was possible to forge a link such that when a receiving Gajim user clicks on it, arbitrary code would be executed on the Gajim user's machine.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Reviews

External links[edit]