Gallinger Municipal Hospital Psychopathic Ward

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Gallinger Municipal Hospital Psychopathic Ward
Gallinger Municipal Hospital Psychopathic Ward is located in Washington, D.C.
Gallinger Municipal Hospital Psychopathic Ward
Location Reservation 13, 19th St. and Massachusetts Ave., SE, Washington, District of Columbia
Coordinates 38°53′4″N 76°58′37″W / 38.88444°N 76.97694°W / 38.88444; -76.97694Coordinates: 38°53′4″N 76°58′37″W / 38.88444°N 76.97694°W / 38.88444; -76.97694
Area 3 acres (1.2 ha)
Built 1920
Architectural style Colonial Revival
Governing body State
NRHP Reference # 89000074[1]
Added to NRHP February 27, 1989

The Gallinger Municipal Hospital Psychopathic Ward consisted of three hospital buildings in the Southwestern Quadrant of Washington, D.C.

History[edit]

These buildings were built in 1920-1923 to the Colonial Revival design of Washington architect Snowden Ashford. Local contractor George H. Wynne constructed the buildings for $766,200. By 1924 it had been featured in the journal Modern Hospital and was also described in 1928 in the standard text The American Hospital of the Twentieth Century.[2]

Prison built on the site.

The hospital was named for Senator Jacob Harold Gallinger of New Hampshire, who sponsored the bill for its construction in the Senate.[3]

It was renamed D.C.General Hospital in 1953, and closed in 2001.[4]

Construction of a prison on the site was planned in 1986, with preservationists contesting the plan until 1989.[5] The buildings were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in February, 1989 and were demolished c. 1990.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  2. ^ Bushong, William B. (1988). "NRHP Nomination, Gallinger Municipal Hospital Psychopathic Ward". National Register of Historic Places. Retrieved March 28, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Municipal Hospital". The garment worker: official organ of the United Garment Workers of America 22: 16. 1922. Retrieved March 28, 2012. 
  4. ^ http://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/medtour/dcgeneral.html
  5. ^ D.C. Appeals Court Clears Way For Building of Prison Here; Panel Refuses to Block Gallinger Demolition, Elsa Walsh, Washington Post, June 9, 1989.
  6. ^ DC Inventory of Historic Sites - G

External links[edit]