Gallipolis, Ohio

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Gallipolis, Ohio
village
Nickname(s): City of the Gauls[1]
Location of Gallipolis, Ohio
Location of Gallipolis, Ohio
Coordinates: 38°48′55″N 82°11′51″W / 38.81528°N 82.19750°W / 38.81528; -82.19750Coordinates: 38°48′55″N 82°11′51″W / 38.81528°N 82.19750°W / 38.81528; -82.19750
Country United States
State Ohio
County Gallia
Township Gallipolis
Area[2]
 • Total 3.83 sq mi (9.92 km2)
 • Land 3.60 sq mi (9.32 km2)
 • Water 0.23 sq mi (0.60 km2)
Elevation [3] 574 ft (175 m)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Total 3,641
 • Estimate (2012[5]) 3,637
 • Density 1,011.4/sq mi (390.5/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45631
Area code(s) 740
FIPS code 39-29204[6]
GNIS feature ID 1077526[3]
Website Village of Gallipolis website

Gallipolis is a chartered village in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Gallia County.[7] The municipality is located in Southeast Ohio on the Ohio River. The population was 3,641 at the 2010 census. When the population dropped below 5,000, Gallipolis became a village,[8] but continues to operate under its existing city charter.[9]

Gallipolis is the second-largest community in the Point Pleasant Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Gallia County, Ohio and Mason County, West Virginia.

History[edit]

Gallipolis was settled in 1790 by French aristocrats known as the "French Five Hundred". Escaping punishment in post-Bastille Day, pre-revolutionary France, the promise of a new life in the boundless American frontier was tempting. However, the French were swindled. The Scioto Company encouraged investors in France to purchase lands in Ohio by describing a virtual Garden of Eden. However, the deeds that they had purchased proved worthless upon their arrival via riverboat. The Scioto Company did not actually own the land, which was not the land of milk and honey that they anticipated. So the disillusioned settlers petitioned Congress and President George Washington for aid, and as a result, the Ohio Company sent a group of woodsmen from Marietta to build a log cabin settlement on what is now the city park. In 1803 Gallia County (in honor of the Gauls), was established by the Ohio state legislature. The first U.S. census was conducted in 1820, and those accounted for at that time are known locally as the "first families." The early 19th Century also brought a large influx of Welsh people, who settled in Gallipolis and nearby Rio Grande. In the late 1960s, Gallipolis gained notoriety for the collapse of the Silver Bridge, which spanned the Ohio River from Gallipolis to Point Pleasant, West Virginia.

Geography[edit]

Gallipolis is located at 38°48′55″N 82°11′51″W / 38.81528°N 82.19750°W / 38.81528; -82.19750 (38.815222, -82.197550),[10] along the Ohio River.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 3.83 square miles (9.92 km2), of which, 3.60 square miles (9.32 km2) is land and 0.23 square miles (0.60 km2) is water.[2] Gallipolis is located in the unglaciated hills of southeastern Ohio.

Public lands[edit]

Gallipolis City Park is located centrally. Cassius M. Canaday Memorial Playground is in the city's east end. Sports facilities include Memorial Field and Cliffside Golf Club. There are also ball fields at the waterworks facility on Chestnut Street. Haskins Memorial Park is contiguous with the golf club. The Elizabeth L. Evans Waterfowl and Bird Sanctuary are adjacent to Memorial Field, which also features a skate park. The Texas Road Wildlife Area is located close by. The city owns and operates the Pine Street and Mound Hill Cemeteries. Mound Hill Park is adjacent to the cemetery.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 1,686
1860 3,418 102.7%
1870 3,711 8.6%
1880 4,400 18.6%
1890 4,498 2.2%
1900 5,432 20.8%
1910 5,560 2.4%
1920 6,670 20.0%
1930 7,106 6.5%
1940 7,833 10.2%
1950 7,871 0.5%
1960 8,775 11.5%
1970 7,490 −14.6%
1980 5,601 −25.2%
1990 4,831 −13.7%
2000 4,180 −13.5%
2010 3,641 −12.9%

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 3,641 people, 1,576 households, and 854 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,011.4 inhabitants per square mile (390.5 /km2). There were 1,869 housing units at an average density of 519.2 per square mile (200.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the village was 89.7% White, 5.1% African American, 0.6% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 3.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.2% of the population.

There were 1,576 households of which 24.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.9% were married couples living together, 15.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 45.8% were non-families. 39.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 18% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.81.

The median age in the village was 44.6 years. 18.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.6% were from 25 to 44; 28.7% were from 45 to 64; and 20.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 48.3% male and 51.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 4,180 people, 1,847 households, and 1,004 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,156.2 people per square mile (445.8/km²). There were 2,056 housing units at an average density of 568.7 per square mile (219.3/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 90.57% White, 6.44% African American, 0.43% Native American, 0.77% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 1.60% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.57% of the population. There were 1,847 households out of which 23.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.8% were married couples living together, 13.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.6% were non-families. 41.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the village the population was spread out with 20.1% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 25.7% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 21.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 86.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.9 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $25,846, and the median income for a family was $36,477. Males had a median income of $30,032 versus $22,473 for females. The per capita income for the village was $16,728. About 13.6% of families and 21.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.3% of those under age 18 and 15.1% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]

Gallipolis, looking north on State Route 7

Gallipolis is the hometown of Bob Evans, founder of Bob Evans Restaurants, the original one which was located in Rio Grande, Ohio. The Bob Evans Farm is located in nearby Rio Grande. The farm still is fully functioning[dubious ], and the original restaurant has been recently demolished, but they have rebuilt a new one. The farm has become a tourist attraction, featuring a picturesque windmill in a vast field, a canoe livery[dubious ], tours and the annual Bob Evans Farm Festival. This event, held on an October weekend, is a tourist attraction that draws several thousand visitors. Bob Evans Restaurants' corporate headquarters is located in Columbus.

Other major employers in Gallipolis/Gallia County include: American Electric Power (General James M. Gavin Plant), Ohio Valley Electric Company (Kyger Creek Power Plant), Holzer Medical Center and Holzer Clinic, University of Rio Grande and Gallipolis City Schools.

Education[edit]

There are four schools within the village. The public schools in the village limits are Gallia Academy Middle School and Washington Elementary, both of which belong to the Gallipolis City Schools. There is also a private school: Ohio Valley Christian School, both elementary and secondary. The public school district also controls Gallia Academy High School [1], Green Elementary and Rio Grande Elementary, which are located outside of the village limits.

The noted scientist Edward Alexander Bouchet, the first African American to earn a doctorate from an American university, served as principal of the city's Lincoln High School from 1908 to 1913.

On November 8, 2005, a bond issue was passed, allowing for both the construction of a new high school and the renovation of the three public elementary schools. The new Gallia Academy High School, scheduled to be completed by July 2009 is located at 2855 Centenary Road, which is a few miles outside of the village limits.

Transportation[edit]

Gallipolis is served by the Gallia-Meigs Regional Airport. US-35 traverses the community, and provides a link to West Virginia across the Ohio River. State routes include OH-7, OH-141, OH-160, and OH-588.

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The History of Gallipolis, Ohio". Retrieved 2008-09-04. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  3. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  5. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  6. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  8. ^ "Ohio Revised Code Section 703.01(A)". Retrieved 2007-09-15. 
  9. ^ Ohio Secretary of State. The Ohio Municipal, Township and School Board Roster 2006-2007. 
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  11. ^ "Michael Weldon Bartrum". databaseFootball.com. Retrieved December 21, 2012. 
  12. ^ http://www.oldies.com/artist-biography/Lionel-Cartwright.html
  13. ^ "CREMEANS, Frank, (1943 - 2003)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 21, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Carl George". NFL Enterprises LLC. Retrieved December 21, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Brereton C. Jones". NNDB. Retrieved December 21, 2012. 
  16. ^ "SWITZER, Robert Mauck, (1863 - 1952)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 21, 2012. 
  17. ^ "VINTON, Samuel Finley, (1792 - 1862)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 21, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Nancy Zimpher, UC's new president, at a glance". Retrieved 2008-09-04. 

External links[edit]