Galloway Township, New Jersey

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Galloway Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Galloway
Map of Galloway Township in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Galloway Township in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Galloway Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Galloway Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°29′29″N 74°28′26″W / 39.491453°N 74.473865°W / 39.491453; -74.473865Coordinates: 39°29′29″N 74°28′26″W / 39.491453°N 74.473865°W / 39.491453; -74.473865[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Atlantic
Royal charter April 4, 1774
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Joseph Galloway or
Mull of Galloway
Government[8]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor Don Purdy (R, 2015).[3][4]
 • Deputy Mayor Anthony Coppola, Jr. (R, 2015)
 • Township Manager Susan Jacobucci (since February 2014)[5][6]
 • Clerk Kelli Danieli (Acting)[7]
Area[2]
 • Total 115.213 sq mi (298.402 km2)
 • Land 89.074 sq mi (230.701 km2)
 • Water 26.139 sq mi (67.701 km2)  22.69%
Area rank 1st of 566 in state
1st of 23 in county[2]
Elevation[9] 30 ft (9 m)
Population (2010 Census)[10][11][12]
 • Total 37,349
 • Estimate (2013)[13] 37,646
 • Rank 61st of 566 in state
3rd of 23 in county[14]
 • Density 419.3/sq mi (161.9/km2)
 • Density rank 456th of 566 in state
13th of 23 in county[14]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08201, 08205[15][16]
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 404, 652, 748[17]
FIPS code 3400125560[18][2][19]
GNIS feature ID 0882052[20][2]
Website www.gtnj.org

Galloway Township is a township in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. At 115.2 square miles (298 km2) of total area, Galloway Township is the largest municipality in the State of New Jersey.[14][21][22] As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 37,349,[10][11][12] reflecting an increase of 6,140 (+19.7%) from the 31,209 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 7,879 (+33.8%) from the 23,330 counted in the 1990 Census; The increase of more than 14,000 in population since the 1990 Census was the 11th-highest in the state.[23]

Galloway Township was incorporated by Royal charter on April 4, 1774, from portions of Egg Harbor Township, when it was still part of Gloucester County. Galloway was incorporated as one of the initial group of 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. After becoming part of the newly formed Atlantic County in 1837, portions of the township were taken to create Mullica Township (March 13, 1838), Egg Harbor City (June 14, 1858), Absecon town (February 29, 1872), Brigantine Beach borough (now Brigantine city; June 14, 1890) and Port Republic (March 1, 1905).[24]

History[edit]

The Township of Galloway was created by Royal Patent of King George III of Great Britain on April 4, 1774. At that time it was part of Gloucester County, and comprised what is now Hammonton, Mullica Township, Egg Harbor City, Port Republic, Brigantine, Atlantic City, and the northern portion of Absecon. Galloway Township was incorporated by the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of the state's initial group of 104 townships under the Township Act of 1798.[24]

For thousands of years, the area of Galloway Township was occupied by different cultures of indigenous peoples. The Lenape Native Americans were the historic tribe who occupied the area at the time of European encounter. They were one of the many Algonguian language peoples of the East Coast.

They were followed by European settlers, primarily English in the early years of colonial settlement. Historians are uncertain of the source of Galloway Township's name. One theory is that is was named after an area known as Galloway now part of the modern region of Dumfries and Galloway in southern Scotland. An alternative derivation is that the Township was named for Joseph Galloway, a Loyalist delegate to the First Continental Congress in 1774, who was opposed to independence of the Thirteen colonies. During the American Revolutionary War, Galloway was the site of the Battle of Chestnut Neck, in what is now a part of Port Republic.[25]

During the spring of 2007, a large swath of oak and other hardwood trees were defoliated by the Gypsy moth caterpillar. Due to budget constraints, the township did not apply for spraying through the State of New Jersey, and the gypsy moths flourished.[26]

On the morning of August 28, 2011, Tropical Storm Irene made its second U.S. landfall in Brigantine, though initial reports placed it at the Little Egg Inlet on the border with Little Egg Harbor Township. At the time it was believed to be the first hurricane to make landfall in New Jersey since 1903,[27] but later analysis by the National Hurricane Center determined that the storm had weakened to tropical storm status by the time it made its second landfall.[28]

Geography[edit]

Galloway Township is located at 39°29′29″N 74°28′26″W / 39.491453°N 74.473865°W / 39.491453; -74.473865 (39.491453,-74.473865). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 115.213 square miles (298.402 km2), of which, 89.074 square miles (230.701 km2) of it was land and 26.139 square miles (67.701 km2) of it (22.69%) was water.[1][2]

Pomona (2010 Census population of 7,124[29]) and Smithville (2010 Census population of 7,242[30]) are census-designated places and unincorporated communities located within Galloway Township.[22][31][32][33] Other unincorporated areas within Galloway Township include Absecon Highlands, Cologne, Conovertown, Germania, Higbeetown, Leeds Point, Oceanville, Pinehurst, South Egg Harbor and the "Township Center".[34]

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[35] Parts of the township are included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Atlantic County, along with areas in Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[36]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820 1,648
1830 2,960 79.6%
1840 2,208 * −25.4%
1850 2,307 4.5%
1860 2,735 * 18.6%
1870 2,860 4.6%
1880 2,337 * −18.3%
1890 2,208 −5.5%
1900 2,469 11.8%
1910 1,976 * −20.0%
1920 2,115 7.0%
1930 3,416 61.5%
1940 3,457 1.2%
1950 4,140 19.8%
1960 5,634 36.1%
1970 8,276 46.9%
1980 12,176 47.1%
1990 23,330 91.6%
2000 31,209 33.8%
2010 37,349 19.7%
Est. 2013 37,646 [13][37] 0.8%
Population sources:
1820-1920[38] 1820-1830[39]
1840-2000[40] 1840[41] 1850-1870[42]
1850[43] 1870[44] 1880-1890[45]
1890-1910[46] 1910-1930[47]
1930-1990[48] 2000[49][50] 2010[10][11][12]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[24]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 37,349 people, 13,067 households, and 9,173 families residing in the township. The population density was 419.3 per square mile (161.9 /km2). There were 14,132 housing units at an average density of 158.7 per square mile (61.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 71.92% (26,860) White, 11.44% (4,271) Black or African American, 0.27% (99) Native American, 10.02% (3,744) Asian, 0.02% (9) Pacific Islander, 3.39% (1,266) from other races, and 2.95% (1,100) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.05% (3,752) of the population.[10]

There were 13,067 households, of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 13.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.8% were non-families. 23.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.12.[10]

In the township, 21.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 14.3% from 18 to 24, 22.5% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.6 years. For every 100 females there were 90.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $65,908 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,931) and the median family income was $76,106 (+/- $2,675). Males had a median income of $50,516 (+/- $3,544) versus $40,663 (+/- $2,096) for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,302 (+/- $2,134). About 5.0% of families and 6.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.3% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.[51]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 31,209 people, 10,772 households, and 7,680 families residing in the township. The population density was 344.9 people per square mile (133.2/km²). There were 11,406 housing units at an average density of 126.1 per square mile (48.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 77.16% White, 9.80% African American, 0.24% Native American, 8.00% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 2.59% from other races, and 2.16% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.16% of the population.[49][50]

There were 10,772 households out of which 38.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.7% were non-families. 21.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.18.[49][50]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.8% under the age of 18, 13.6% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.1 males.[49][50]

The median income for a household in the township was $51,595, and the median income for a family was $57,156. Males had a median income of $38,048 versus $31,167 for females. The per capita income for the township was $21,048. About 4.4% of families and 6.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 11.9% of those age 65 or over.[49][50]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Galloway Township operates under the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) within Plan E of the Council-Manager form of New Jersey municipal government, implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1976.[52] The governing body is the Township Council, which consists of seven members who are elected at-large in partisan elections to four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with an election every two years in which either three or four seats come up for vote as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting after each election, members of Council select one of their members to take the office of Mayor and another to serve as Deputy Mayor, who serve two-year terms in that office.[8] The Township Council is led by a Mayor whose role is to preside over meetings and sign certain documents on behalf of the township. The Council sets policy for the township as its the governing body, with the day-to-day operation of the Township and its municipal services delegated to the Township Manager.[53]

As of 2014, the members of the Galloway Township Council are Mayor Don Purdy (R, term ends December 31, 2017), Deputy Mayor Anthony J. Coppola, Jr. (R, 2015), Frank Gargione (R, 2017), Jim Gorman (D, 2015), Robert Maldonado (R, 2017), Timothy Meadows (R, 2017), and Brian Tyrrell (R, 2015).[3][54][55][56][57][58]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Galloway Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[59] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[11][60][61] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Galloway Township had been in the 2nd state legislative district.[62]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[63] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[64][65] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[66][67]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 9th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor Township).[68] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[69] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[70]

Atlantic County is governed by a directly elected executive and a nine-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, responsible for legislation. The executive serves a four-year term and the freeholders are elected to staggered three-year terms, of which four are elected from the county on an at-large basis and five of the freeholders represent equally populated districts.[71][72] As of 2014, Atlantic County's Executive is Republican Dennis Levinson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[73] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are Chairman Frank D. Formica, Freeholder District 2, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Linwood, Longport, Margate, Northfield, Somers Point and Ventnor (R, 2015),[74] Vice Chairman John W. Risley, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[75] Colin G. Bell, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2015),[76] James A. Bertino, Freeholder District 5, including Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth (R, 2015),[77] Ernest D. Coursey, Freeholder District 1, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville (R, 2016),[78] Richard Dase, Freeholder District 4, including Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic (D, 2016),[79] Alexander C. Marino, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[80] Will Pauls, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2016)[81] and Frank Sutton, Freeholder District 3, including Egg Harbor Township (part) and Hamilton Township (part) (R, 2014).[82][83][84] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Edward P. McGettigan (2016),[85] Sheriff Frank X. Balles (2014)[86] and Surrogate James Curcio (2015).[87][88]

Education[edit]

For pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade, students attend the Galloway Township Public Schools. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's six schools had an enrollment of 3,410 students and 308.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.07:1.[89] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[90]) are Pomona Preschool[91] (71) for Kindergarten, four K-6 elementary schools — Arthur Rann Elementary School[92] (657), Reeds Road Elementary School[93] (651), Roland Rogers Elementary School[94] (551) and Smithville Elementary School[95] (649) — along with Galloway Township Middle School[96] with 831 students in grades 7–8.[97][98]

Public school students in Ninth through twelfth grades attend Absegami High School, located in the township.[99] In addition, students in the western portion of the township have the option of attending Cedar Creek High School in neighboring Egg Harbor City under the school of choice program. Both high schools are part of the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District, a regional public high school district serving students from the constituent districts of Egg Harbor City, Galloway Township, Hamilton Township and Mullica Township. The district also serves students from the districts of the City of Port Republic and Washington Township (in Burlington County) as part of sending/receiving relationships.[100]

Township public school students are also eligible to attend the Atlantic County Institute of Technology[101] or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.[102]

The Galloway Community Charter School is a public school that serves students in kindergarten through eighth grade. The school operates independently of the Galloway Township Public Schools under a charter issued by the New Jersey Department of Education. There is no tuition charged; costs are paid on a per-student basis by each of the sending districts, with additional funding provided by the State of New Jersey. The school draws its students from throughout Atlantic County.[103]

Assumption Regional Catholic School is a Catholic elementary school for pre-Kindergarten through eighth grades with a specially designed Middle School system, operated under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Camden and serving students from the sending parishes of Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish (Galloway Township), St. Thomas the Apsotle Church (Brigantine) and St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish (Absecon).[104][105]

The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey is a four-year liberal arts college located in the Pomona section of Galloway Township.[106]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 253.48 miles (407.94 km) of roadways, of which 171.70 miles (276.32 km) are maintained by the municipality, 59.44 miles (95.66 km) by Atlantic County and 16.66 miles (26.81 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 5.68 miles (9.14 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[107]

The Garden State Parkway passes through the township, extending 5.7 miles (9.2 km) from Egg Harbor Township in the south to Port Republic in the north.[108] Included in the township are Interchange 40 for U.S. Route 30 White Horse Pike East and Interchange 44 for Route 575 Pomona.[109] It was on this stretch of the Parkway that Governor of New Jersey Jon Corzine was involved in a serious accident on April 12, 2007.[110]

Also passing through the township are Route 50 and U.S. Route 30, along with CR 561, CR 561 Alternate, CR 563 and CR 575.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to Atlantic City on routes 508 (from the Hamilton Mall), 554 (from Lindenwold station) and 559 (from Lakewood Township).[111][112]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Galloway Township include:

Points of interest[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 19, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Mayor and Council, Galloway Township. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  4. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 19, 2013. As of date accessed Purdy is listed as mayor with a term-end date incorrectly listed as December 31, 2014.
  5. ^ Township Manager, Galloway Township. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  6. ^ Lemongello, Steven. "Galloway Township to welcome new town manager", Press of Atlantic City, Accessed February 23, 2014
  7. ^ Clerk's Office, Galloway Township. Accessed October 5, 2014.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 13.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Galloway, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Galloway township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 8, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 5. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Galloway township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 8, 2012.
  13. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
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  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 10, 2011.
  16. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Galloway, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  18. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
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  21. ^ Barlas, Thomas. "Step aside, Hamilton twp.: Galloway is bigger / 'Largest' N.J. town a little smaller than neighbor, data show", The Press of Atlantic City, July 9, 2007. Accessed October 3, 2012. "But Hamilton Township residents might want to take another look at the numbers before becoming too smug with its bigness: The federal government says neighboring Galloway Township is actually larger."
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  25. ^ "History", Galloway Township. Accessed August 2, 2012. Quote: "Historians are unsure as to how Galloway got its name. One opinion is that is was named after an area in Scotland known as Galloway Mull. The other theory is that it was named after Joseph Galloway, a Loyalist delegate to the Continental Congress."
  26. ^ Prisament, Steve. "State approach on gypsy moth spraying really bugs council", Current of Galloway, June 13, 2007. Accessed June 29, 2007.
  27. ^ Staff. "Hurricane Irene makes landfall in New Jersey; storm should be gone by mid-afternoon, meteorologist predicts - UPDATE", The Express-Times, August 28, 2011. Accessed September 29, 2014. "Hurricane Irene made landfall at 5:35 this morning in Little Egg Inlet, near Atlantic City, according to Hackettstown-based WeatherWorks meteorologist Nick Troiano, with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph, 1 mile an hour above the level at which a hurricane is defined. It was 1903 the last time a hurricane -- also a category one storm -- Troiano said."
  28. ^ Avila, Lixion A.; and Cangialosi, John. "Tropical Cyclone Report Hurricane Irene (AL092011) 21-28 August 2011", National Hurricane Center, December 14, 2011, updated April 11, 2012. Accessed September 29, 2014. "Irene then continued north-northeastward, just offshore of the Delmarva peninsula, and made another landfall very near Atlantic City, New Jersey, at Brigantine Island, at 0935 UTC 28 August. Although Irene’s intensity at the New Jersey landfall was 60 kt, winds of that strength were confined to the waters east of the track of the center."
  29. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Pomona CDP, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 8, 2012.
  30. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Smithville CDP, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  31. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 22, 2012.
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  34. ^ Fast Facts Brochure 2009, Galloway Township. Accessed August 2, 2012. "UNINCORPORATED AREAS WITHIN GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP: Absecon Highlands, Cologne, Conovertown, Germania, Higbeetown, Leeds Point, Oceanville, Pinehurst, Pomona, Smithville and South Egg Harbor, and the 'Township Center'"
  35. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  36. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed November 18, 2013.
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  43. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  44. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  45. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed August 2, 2012.
  46. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed August 2, 2012.
  47. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed August 2, 2012.
  48. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed January 8, 2012.
  49. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Galloway township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 2, 2012.
  50. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Galloway township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 2, 2012.
  51. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Galloway township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 8, 2012.
  52. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  53. ^ Form of Municipal Government, Galloway Township. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  54. ^ Municipal Governments in Atlantic County, Atlantic County, New Jersey, last updated October 31, 2013. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  55. ^ Result.htm Atlantic County GENERAL ELECTION - UNOFFICIAL RESULTS November 5, 2013, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 4, 2014.
  56. ^ Atlantic County General Election November 8, 2011, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  57. ^ "Republicans Win Four Seats on Township Council", Galloway Patch. Accessed January 2, 2014.
  58. ^ Bergen, Douglas. "Don Purdy Re-Elected as Galloway Mayor; Anthony Coppola Jr. returns as deputy mayor after Township Council's reorganization meeting on Jan. 2.", Galloway Patch, January 5, 2014. Accessed September 29, 2014.
  59. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  60. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  61. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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