Games of Love and Chance

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Games of Love and Chance
GamesOfLoveAndChance.jpg
Directed by Abdellatif Kechiche
Produced by Jacques Ouaniche
Written by Abdellatif Kechiche
Ghalia Lacroix
Starring Osman Elkharraz
Sara Forestier
Sabrina Ouazani
Cinematography Lubomir Bakchev
Edited by Antonella Bevenja
Ghalia Lacroix
Distributed by New Yorker Films (USA)
Release date(s) November 25, 2003
Running time 117 minutess (France)
123 minutess (USA)
Country France
Language French

Games of Love and Chance (French: L'Esquive) is a 2003 French drama film directed by Abdellatif Kechiche and starring Sara Forestier. It won the César Award for Best Film, Best Director, Best Writing and Most Promising Actress.

The film was shot in Seine-Saint-Denis in 6 weeks in October and November 2002.[1]

Synopsis[edit]

A group of teenagers from the housing projects of the Paris suburbs practice a passage from the play Games of Love and Chance by Marivaux for their French class. Abdelkrim, or Krimo, who initially does not act in the play, falls in love with Lydia. In order to try to seduce her, he accepts the role of Arlequin and joins the rehearsal. But his timidness and awkwardness keeps him from participating in the play as well as succeeding with Lydia.

Cast[edit]

Other than Sara Forestier, many of the actors in this film were inexperienced in cinema and recruited specifically for the film.[2]

  • Osman Elkharraz as Krimo
  • Sara Forestier as Lydia
  • Sabrina Ouazani as Frida
  • Nanou Benhamou as Nanou, the sister of Krimo
  • Hafet Ben-Ahmed as Fathi, Krimo's best friend
  • Aurélie Ganito as Magalie, the girlfriend of Krimo (broke up near the beginning of the film)
  • Carole Franck as French professor
  • Hajar Hamlili as Zina
  • Rachid Hami as Rachid / Arlequin
  • Meryem Serbah as the mother of Krimo
  • Hanane Mazouz as Hanane
  • Sylvain Phan as Slam
  • Olivier Loustau, Rosalie Symon, Patrick Kodjo Topou, Lucien Tipaldi as the police
  • Reinaldo Wong as The couturier
  • Nu Du, Ki Hong, Brigitte Bellony-Riskwait, Ariyapitipum Naruemol, Fatima Lahbi

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rice, Anne-Christine (2007). Cinema for French Conversation. Focus Publishing. p. 142. ISBN 978-1-58510-268-6. 
  2. ^ Rice, Anne-Christine (2007). Cinema for French Conversation. Focus Publishing. p. 138. ISBN 978-1-58510-268-6. 

External links[edit]

Awards
Preceded by
The Barbarian Invasions
César Award for Best Film
2005
Succeeded by
The Beat That My Heart Skipped