Gander Lake

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Gander Lake
Gander Lake map.png
Map showing the location of Gander Lake
Location Newfoundland
Coordinates 48°55′52″N 54°44′03″W / 48.93111°N 54.73417°W / 48.93111; -54.73417Coordinates: 48°55′52″N 54°44′03″W / 48.93111°N 54.73417°W / 48.93111; -54.73417
Basin countries Canada
Max. length 56 km (35 mi)
Max. width 7 km
Surface area 113.2 km2 [1]
Average depth 105.4 m [1]
Max. depth 288 m [1]

Gander Lake is located in the central part of the Canadian island of Newfoundland in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. It is the third-largest lake on Newfoundland.[1]

Measuring 56 km (35 mi) in length and several kilometres in width, the lake is oriented roughly northwest–southeast. The town of Gander is located on the eastern shore at roughly its midpoint, and the towns of Appleton and Glenwood are situated on the northern extremity of the lake, on the banks of the Gander River. Gander Lake has been measured to 288 m (945 ft) in some areas, but has been estimated to much deeper depths, though not validated due to unclear openings in the "bottom" of the lake.[citation needed] The extreme depth is the result of being situated on the Dover Fault line, similar to Loch Ness in Scotland. It is the main source of water for the towns of Gander, Appleton and Glenwood.

Near the southeastern end of the lake, just over 12 km (7.5 mi) outside of the town of Gander, there is a small, quarry-cut, artificial harbour, commonly known as "Little Harbour". This area is a common public boat launch for owners of pleasure craft. The area hosts three separate boat launch docks, the largest of which was rebuilt in the summer of 1997. The docks are commonly used by the local swimmers as diving platforms. The harbour also contains a concrete boat launch and a fire pit area for day trips. Camping is frowned upon, if not outright forbidden in the immediate area of the boat launch. However there are several pebble beaches which are used by tenters, accessible from a hiking trail over a rocky hill to the northwest. Boaters have much better access to both pebble and sand beaches. There are many long stretches of beaches, such as one commonly known as the "fifteen mile brook", which are excellent for camping (as long as you don't forget to bring bug spray). Other well known areas throughout the lake include "Hunt's Cove", "Southwest" and "Gander River".

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d O'Connell, Michael F.; Dempson, J. Brian; Power, Michael (December 2005), "Ecology and Trophic Relationships of the Fishes of Gander Lake, a Large, Deep, Oligotrophic Lake in Newfoundland, Canada", International Review of Hydrobiology 90 (5–6): 486–510, doi:10.1002/iroh.200510804, ISSN 1434-2944