Gap, Hautes-Alpes

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Gap
Jean Marcellin Square
Jean Marcellin Square
Coat of arms of Gap
Coat of arms
Gap is located in France
Gap
Gap
Coordinates: 44°33′34″N 6°04′43″E / 44.5594°N 6.0786°E / 44.5594; 6.0786Coordinates: 44°33′34″N 6°04′43″E / 44.5594°N 6.0786°E / 44.5594; 6.0786
Country France
Region Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Department Hautes-Alpes
Arrondissement Gap
Government
 • Mayor (2008–2014) Roger Didier
Area1 110.43 km2 (42.64 sq mi)
Population (2009)2 41,170
 • Density 370/km2 (970/sq mi)
INSEE/Postal code 05061 / 05000
Elevation 625–2,360 m (2,051–7,743 ft)
(avg. 745 m or 2,444 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Gap (French: [ɡap]; Occitan: Gap) is a commune in south-eastern France, the capital and largest settlement of the Hautes-Alpes department. At 750m above sea level, it is France's highest prefecture (departmental capital). Together with other Alpine towns Gap engages in the Alpine Town of the Year Association for the implementation of the Alpine Convention to achieve sustainable development in the Alpine Arc. Gap was awarded Alpine Town of the Year 2002.

Geography[edit]

An Alpine crossroads at the intersection of D994 and the Route nationale 85 or Route Napoléon, Gap lies 745 metres (2,400 ft) above sea level along the right bank of the Luye River (fr) (close to where it joins the Durance River). The region around Gap is known as Gapençais (fr).

History[edit]

Originally founded by the Gauls, the Roman emperor Augustus seized the town in 14 BC and renamed it Vapincum. Eight years later, a Roman road was started, which linked the city to what is now Valencia, Spain. Vapincum grew as a transportation hub and was fortified by later Roman Emperors to protect it against Barbarians. From 28 December 986, the Bishop of Gap had sovereignty over the city due to concerns about future Muslim invasions, and held that power until Revolutionary reforms in 1801 despite Gap being annexed by the French crown in 1512.[1]

When the former royal province of Dauphiné was re-organised by the French Revolutionary government in 1790, Gap was made prefecture of the new Hautes-Alpes department, which it remains to this day.[1]

Napoleon I left Elba in February 1815 and had reached Gap on 15 March with 40 horsemen and 10 grenadiers where he had thousands of copies of his Proclamations printed. The whole population of the city accompanied Napoleon when he left Gap.

Gap ran a bid to host the 2018 Winter Olympics,[2] but lost out as France's candidate to nearby Annecy. The games were eventually awarded to Pyeongchang in South Korea.[3]

People[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1793 6,014 —    
1800 8,050 +33.9%
1806 8,891 +10.4%
1821 6,714 −24.5%
1831 7,215 +7.5%
1836 7,854 +8.9%
1841 8,599 +9.5%
1846 8,724 +1.5%
1851 8,797 +0.8%
1856 8,912 +1.3%
1861 8,219 −7.8%
1866 8,165 −0.7%
1872 8,927 +9.3%
1876 9,294 +4.1%
1881 10,765 +15.8%
1886 11,621 +8.0%
1891 10,478 −9.8%
1896 11,376 +8.6%
1901 11,018 −3.1%
1906 10,823 −1.8%
1911 10,647 −1.6%
1921 9,859 −7.4%
1926 10,660 +8.1%
1931 11,717 +9.9%
1936 13,600 +16.1%
1946 16,371 +20.4%
1954 17,317 +5.8%
1962 20,478 +18.3%
1968 23,994 +17.2%
1975 28,233 +17.7%
1982 30,676 +8.7%
1990 33,444 +9.0%
1999 36,269 +8.4%
2008 38,584 +6.4%
41,170 —    

Sights[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Gap, Briançon, Hautes Alpes (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) - Die, Drôme (Rhône-Alpes)". LaRocheUSA.org. Retrieved 2013-04-17. 
  2. ^ "gap-2018.fr". gap-2018.fr. Retrieved 2013-04-17. 
  3. ^ "BBC Sport - Winter Sports - Pyeongchang will host the 2018 Winter Olympics". BBC News. 2011-07-06. Retrieved 2013-04-17. 

External links[edit]