Garam dal

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The Indian National Congress was formed in 1885, in 1907 it split into two faction, extremists - Garam Dal (hot faction) led by Tilak and moderates Naram Dal (soft faction) led by Gokhale.[citation needed] They were termed so because of their attitude towards the British rule.[1] The Garam Dal is considered as a trimuvirate comprising apart from Tilak, Lala Lajpat Rai and Bipinchandra Pal.[citation needed] According to Bhatt and Bhargava, the differences between the two factions of the Congress paralyzed it, due to which "the agitation for independence ran out of steam and it remained so till the end of the first world war". The Naram Dal of the Congress helped the British in its war effort, on the other hand the Garam Dal led by Tilak and Annie Beasant started the Home Rule League agitation in 1917.[citation needed] Asgharali Engineer writes that the Garam Dal separated itself from the Congress, after the differences that came to fore during the Congress session of Surat in 1907.[citation needed] Motilal Nehru until 1915, was a follower of the moderates, however under persuasion of his son Jawaharlal Nehru, his politics led him to join the Garam Dal.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roy Jackson (2011). Mawlana Mawdudi and Political Islam: Authority and the Islamic State. Taylor & Francis. p. 58. ISBN 978-0-415-47411-5. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  2. ^ B. K. Chaturvedi. Chacha Nehru. Diamond Pocket Books (P) Ltd. pp. 19–. ISBN 978-81-7182-354-3. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 

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