Garchen Rinpoche

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Garchen Rinpoche

Garchen Rinpoche (born 1936, east Tibet) is a Tibetan Buddhist teacher in the Drikung Kagyu lineage.[1] He is believed to be an incarnation of Siddha Gar Chodingpa, a heart-disciple of Jigten Sumgön, founder of the Drikung Kagyu lineage in the thirteenth century, C.E. He is also believed to have incarnated as Mahasiddha Aryadeva in ancient India - the lotus-born disciple of Nagarjuna himself. He was known as Lonpo Gar, the minister of Tibetan dharma king Songsten Gampo in the seventh century CE.

Life[edit]

Garchen Rinpoche was born in 1936 in Nangchen, Kham in eastern Tibet.[1] When Garchen Rinpoche was seven years old he was brought to Lho Miyal Monastery[1][2] after he was recognized by the former Drikung Kyabgon Zhiwe Lodro where he was instructed by Siddha Chime Dorje.[1]

When he was 22 he was imprisoned by the Chinese for 20 years and put in a labor camp during the Chinese Cultural Revolution.[1] During that time he met with Khenpo Munsel [1][3] who became his root guru. Khenpo Munsel was a Nyingma master who taught him during the whole 20 years of his imprisonment. During that time, while enduring the labor camp hardships, Garchen Rinpoche kept on practicing in secret,[1] according to his guru's instructions until he achieved the wisdom-mind which Khenpo Musel called "an emanation of a Bodhisattva".

Garchen Rinpoche was released from prison in 1979.[1] As soon as he was released, he took it upon himself to rebuild the Drikung Kagyu monasteries,[1] reestablish the Buddhist teachings, and build two boarding schools for local children in eastern Tibet.[4]

Garchen Rinpoche first came to North America in 1997, teaching in Canada and the United States.

Current activities and expertise[edit]

Garchen Rinpoche is the founder and spiritual director of the Garchen Buddhist Institute in Chino Valley, Arizona,[1] the Drikung Mahayana Center in North Potomac, Maryland[1] and Gar Drolma Choling in Dayton, Ohio.[1] Rinpoche is also the spiritual director of many other Dharma centers[5] and teaches throughout North America, Asia, and Europe.

Rinpoche is a master of dzogchen, the fivefold practice Mahamudra, the six yogas of Naropa, and the preliminary practices (Tib. ngondro). He widely promotes Thogme Zangpo's Thirty-Seven Practices of a Bodhisattva and White Tara practice.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l His Eminence Garchen Rinpoche
  2. ^ Farber, Don; Rebecca McClen Novick (2005). Portraits of Tibetan Buddhist Masters. University of California Press. p. 108. ISBN 978-0-520-23973-9. 
  3. ^ Chhosphel, Samten (March 2013). "Khenpo Munsel". The Treasury of Lives: Biographies of Himalayan Religious Masters. Retrieved 2013-08-19. 
  4. ^ Ettenborough, Kelly (2003). Arizona's Sanctuaries, Retreats, and Sacred Places. Big Earth Publishing. p. 147. ISBN 978-1-56579-438-2. 
  5. ^ Staff. "Garchen Buddhist Institute - Resources for the Sangha: Affiliated Centers". Garchen Buddhist Institute. Retrieved 2010-02-04. 
  6. ^ White Tara Practice with H.E. Garchen Rinpoche

External links[edit]