Garden Party (The Office)

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"Garden Party"
The Office episode
Episode no. Season 8
Episode 4
Directed by David Rogers
Written by Justin Spitzer
Production code 804
Original air date October 13, 2011
Guest actors
Episode chronology
← Previous
"Lotto"
Next →
"Spooked"
List of The Office (U.S.) episodes

"Garden Party" is the fourth episode of the eighth season of the American comedy television series The Office, and the show's 156th episode overall. The episode originally aired on NBC in the United States on October 13, 2011. It was written by co-executive producer Justin Spitzer and was directed by David Rogers and marks Mindy Kaling's first credit as executive producer. "Garden Party" features a guest appearance from Josh Groban, Dee Wallace and Stephen Collins.

The series—presented as if it were a real documentary—depicts the everyday lives of office employees in the Scranton, Pennsylvania, branch of the fictional Dunder Mifflin Paper Company. In the episode, Andy Bernard (Ed Helms) throws a garden party at Schrute Farms to impress Robert California (James Spader), with his parents and brother in attendance. Meanwhile, Dwight Schrute (Rainn Wilson) works to make it a classy event.

"Garden Party" features a substantial appearance by Josh Groban; Kaling had asked Groban if he could guest star in the series, through Twitter. The episode received mixed reviews from critics, with The A.V. Club writer Myles McNutt criticizing the episode for repeating plot ideas. According to Nielsen Media Research, "Garden Party" drew more than 6 million viewers and received a 3.2 rating/8% share in the 18–49 demographic, staying even with the previous episode, "Lotto". It ranked third in its timeslot, and ranked as the highest-rated NBC series on Thursday.

Plot[edit]

Andy decides to throw a garden party at Schrute Farms to impress his parents and Robert California (James Spader). Andy is noticeably jealous at the amount of attention his younger brother Walter Bernard, Jr. (Josh Groban) receives from his father, and he thinks that by throwing an elaborate party he can ensure his father's blessings. At first, the party goes along smoothly. Andy decides to make a toast to Robert in order to get his fellow employees to toast him, as if to show to his parents and California that he is a respected individual among his employees. His plan backfires, however, and instead many people end up praising Robert. To get everybody's mind off of Robert, Andy decides to sing "More Than Words" as a duet with his father. This too goes awry as his visibly annoyed father corrects his playing and singing, and ultimately decides to sing a duet with Walter Jr. instead of Andy. Visibly upset, Andy stops their singing and storms off. Soon thereafter, Andy is confronted by his father for his "obnoxious attitude", which he turns into a browbeating on Andy as "manager of some rinky dink branch". This conversation is overheard by the other staff on the baby monitor Jim and Pam brought for their daughter, and Pam quickly turns off the monitor to let Andy save face. Darryl Philbin (Craig Robinson) and Oscar Martinez (Oscar Nunez) later confide to the camera that they now understand why Andy feels he needs to prove himself to everyone. After his family leaves, a dejected Andy, feeling unwanted by his family and co-workers, says goodbye to the office staff as they turn the garden party into a barbecue. Darryl and Oscar, however, manage to convince Andy to stay with a cheeseburger and a beer, and they all watch, satisfied, as Dwight performs the closing ceremonies to the garden party.

Meanwhile, Dwight Schrute (Rainn Wilson) works to make the garden party a classy event. Dwight thoroughly reads a book called Throwing A Garden Party that he bought online, thinking it was a great buy. However, the book is revealed to be an elaborate prank, secretly written by Jim Halpert (John Krasinski) under the pseudonym "James Trickington". The book gives outlandish advice such as announcing each guest's name as they arrive in an extremely loud manner among other absurd "duties" (imitating The Last Supper in the middle of a meal, randomly dancing with his party staff, etc.). Near the end of the episode, Andy and the staff look on in delight as Dwight and his workers perform a fire court dance (as part of the Trickington book) as a closing ceremonies. The episode then ends with footage of Jim abusing Dwight's announcing duties by walking past him and then walking back again, prompting Dwight to shout Jim's name each time Jim walks by and eventually shouting Jim's name when asked who the best salesman at Dunder Mifflin is.

Also, Pam Halpert (Jenna Fischer) feuds with co-worker Angela Lipton (Angela Kinsey) over baby names. Pam and Angela learn they've both chosen the name Phillip for their soon-to-be-born sons, with Pam choosing to name her child after her deceased grandfather and Angela after the name of her favorite cat. Angela, visibly annoyed that Pam doesn't relinquish the name right away, later makes a toast to "my son Phillip" at the garden party—only to have Pam make the same toast but describe in great detail how the name honors her now-dead grandfather. Angela, unwilling to reveal her feline-centric reasons for the name, grouses to the camera that Pam is always copying her.

Production[edit]

Josh Groban appeared as Andy's younger brother, Walter Bernard, Jr.

The episode was written by co-executive producer Justin Spitzer, his 10th writing credit for the series. It was directed by series editor David Rogers, his 4th directing credit for the series. Beginning with this episode, Mindy Kaling was promoted to executive producer.[3] Before this, it was speculated that she might not return to the series as a writer.[4] The episode features guest appearance from Stephen Collins, Dee Wallace and Josh Groban as Andy's father, mother and brother, respectively. Collins and Wallace were reported to appear on the series by Joyce Eng of TV Guide.[1] Josh Groban was later reported to appear on the series the next day.[2] Writer Mindy Kaling had sent Groban a message through Twitter asking if he would want to appear on the series.[5] He responded yes with the filming week of the episode lining up with his Los Angeles concert for his Straight to You Tour.[5]

Reception[edit]

Ratings[edit]

In its original American broadcast on October 13, 2011, "Garden Party" was viewed by an estimated 6.050 million viewers and received a 3.2 rating/8% share among adults between the ages of 18 and 49.[6] This means that it was seen by 3.2% of all 18- to 49-year-olds, and 8% of all 18- to 49-year-olds watching television at the time of the broadcast. Although seeing a 3.8% increase in viewership, the episode matched the 18-49 demo rating from the previous episode, "Lotto".[7] The episode ranked third in its timeslot beating Person of Interest which received a 2.7 rating/7% share in the 18–49 demographic and The Secret Circle which received a 0.8 rating/2% share, but was defeated by Grey's Anatomy which received a 3.4 rating/9% share and The X Factor which received a 3.6 rating/10% share.[6]

Reviews[edit]

The episode received mixed reviews from critics. HitFix writer Alan Sepinwall stated that the episode "offered more laughs than some of this season's other episodes".[8] Despite this, he criticized the episode's main plot with Andy commenting that "where giving Michael Scott power made him a funnier character than he would have been were he just another salesman, Andy has somehow become less funny since the promotion".[8] Chris Plante of New York called the episode "funny, weird, touching, and unpredictable. A gem, really".[9] National Post writer Barry Hertz compared the episode to "Booze Cruise", "Beach Games" and "The Search".[10] M. Giant of Television without Pity gave the episode a B-.[11] Several critics praised the return of former Office writer, Michael Schur as Mose Schrute.[8][12] Barry Hertz said that "the sight gag of him running atop a field of cars like a watered-down Evel Knievel was enough to give this episode an easy A".[10]

Despite this, the episode received some negative reviews. The A.V. Club reviewer Myles McNutt was more negative towards the episode writing that "Here, we have a case where an episode could have signaled at least some sense of what else the show might be interested in other than Andy as the well-meaning but hapless boss and Pam and Angela’s dueling pregnancies, and all we got were variations on those storylines with no new angle either narratively".[12] He ultimately gave the episode a C.[12] IGN writer Cindy White considered the episode superior to previous "external" episodes "Christening" and "Phyllis's Wedding", but considered it inferior to the "Niagara" and the "classic" "Booze Cruise".[13] She criticized the main plot for rehashing previous plot lines.[13] She ultimately gave the episode a 7.0/10.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Eng, Joyce (August 17, 2011). "Stephen Collins, Dee Wallace to Appear on The Office". TV Guide. Retrieved August 18, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (August 18, 2011). "Josh Groban To Play Ed Helms' Brother On 'The Office'". Deadline. Retrieved August 18, 2011. 
  3. ^ Moaba, Alex (September 15, 2011). "Mindy Kaling Gets 'Office' Promotion to Executive Producer". Aol TV. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  4. ^ Keller, Joel (May 12, 2011). "Is Mindy Kaling Done Writing for 'The Office'?". Aol TV. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b "Q&A: Josh Groban on his Office role". National Post. October 14, 2011. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b Gorman, Bill (October 14, 2011). "TV Ratings Thursday: ‘X Factor’ Drops, Still Leads Fox Win; On A Mixed Night Of Advances & Declines". TV by the Numbers. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  7. ^ Seidman, Robert (October 7, 2011). "Thursday Final Ratings: ‘X Factor,’ ‘The Big Bang Theory,’ ‘Grey’s Anatomy,’ ‘The Office,’ ‘Person of Interest,’ ‘Parks & Rec’ Adjusted Up; ‘Private Practice’ Down". TV by the Numbers. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  8. ^ a b c Sepinwall, Alan (October 13, 2011). "Review: The Office - Garden Party: The host with the most". HitFix. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  9. ^ Plante, Chris (October 14, 2011). "The Office Recap: Ain’t No Party Like a Garden Party". New York. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  10. ^ a b Hertz, Barry (October 13, 2011). "Recap: The Office, Season 8, Episode 4". National Post. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  11. ^ M. Giant (October 13, 2011). "The Office TV Show - Garden Party". Television without a Pity. Retrieved November 20, 2011. 
  12. ^ a b c McNutt, Myles (October 13, 2011). "Garden Party". The A.V. Club. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  13. ^ a b c White, Cindy (October 14, 2011). "The Office: "Garden Party" Review". IGN. Retrieved November 20, 2011. 

External links[edit]