Garth Crooks

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Garth Crooks
Personal information
Full name Garth Anthony Crooks[1]
Date of birth (1958-03-10) 10 March 1958 (age 56)[1]
Place of birth Stoke-on-Trent, England[1]
Height 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Playing position Forward
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1976–1980 Stoke City 147 (48)
1980–1985 Tottenham Hotspur 125 (48)
1983–1984 Manchester United (loan) 7 (2)
1985–1987 West Bromwich Albion 40 (16)
1987–1990 Charlton Athletic 56 (15)
Total 375 (129)
National team
1979–1980 England U21 4 (3)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Garth Anthony Crooks OBE (born 10 March 1958) is a retired English football player of Jamaican ancestry. He played for Stoke City, Tottenham Hotspur, Manchester United, West Bromwich Albion and Charlton Athletic.[1][2] Throughout his career he was an active member of the Professional Footballers' Association and was elected the first black chairman of the union. He currently works for the BBC as a pundit.

Club career[edit]

Crooks was born in Bucknall, Stoke-on-Trent, and progressed through the youth ranks at Stoke City signing professional contract forms in March 1976.[2] He made his debut in April at home to Coventry City becoming the first black player to play for Stoke since Roy Brown in the 1940s. In the 1976–77 season his first full season he was top-scorer albeit with just six goals as Stoke's financial problems saw them relegated to the Second Division.[2] Many black players at the time suffered racist abuse from the stands. Crooks was no exception, but his "cocky arrogance" meant it did little to affect him.[2] His pace caused problems for Second Division defences as he again top-scored with 19 in 1977–78 as Stoke failed to mount a serious promotion attempt. Manager Alan Durban decided to play Crooks as a winger at the start of the 1978–79 season, a decision which Crooks openly criticised.[2] He was restored to his striker role with the season coming to an end which saw Stoke gain promotion by beating Notts County on the final day of the season.[2] He scored 14 goals in 1979–80 as Stoke safely avoided relegation but tensions between Crooks and Durban resurfaced which led to Crooks handing in a transfer request.[2]

He was sold to Tottenham Hotspur in the summer of 1980 for a fee of £650,000, where he formed a successful striking partnership with Steve Archibald. With Crooks leading the line, Spurs won two FA Cups, and the 1984 UEFA Cup against Anderlecht (he was an unused substitute in the final's second leg). Crooks is frequently credited as the first black player to score in an FA Cup final for his equalising goal in a 3–2 win over Manchester City in 1981,[3] though this was pre-dated by Mike Trebilcock in 1966.[4] He later went on loan to Manchester United and had spells at West Bromwich Albion and Charlton Athletic before a knee injury forced his retirement in 1990.[5]

International career[edit]

Crooks represented England at international level making four appearances for the England Under-21s for whom he scored three goals.

Media career[edit]

In 1988, Crooks became the first black chairman of the Professional Footballers' Association but gave up the role after retiring in 1990.[5] He first worked in the media as a match analyst at the 1982 and 1990 World Cups and later worked as Match of the Day's reporter at the England camp at Euro 2000 and the 2002 World Cup.[5] In the late 1990s, Crooks became presenter of the political television show Despatch Box. In 1999 he was awarded an OBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours for his services to football punditry, specifically citing his ability to bring passion to football.[5] He currently appears regularly on Final Score as a pundit and on rare occasions still appears on Match of the Day as a replacement for regular pundits (Alan Shearer, Alan Hansen and Mark Lawrenson). He is occasionally seen interviewing players for BBC television after league football matches. He also names his team of the week (Premier League) each week on the BBC website.[6]

Career statistics[edit]

Club Season League FA Cup League Cup Europe Other[A] Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Stoke City 1975–76 First Division 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
1976–77 First Division 23 6 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 26 6
1977–78 Second Division 42 18 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 45 19
1978–79 Second Division 40 12 1 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 46 14
1979–80 First Division 40 12 1 0 4 2 0 0 0 0 45 14
Total 147 48 5 1 12 3 0 0 0 0 164 53
Tottenham Hotspur 1980–81 First Division 40 16 9 4 6 2 0 0 0 0 55 22
1981–82 First Division 27 13 7 3 7 0 5 2 0 0 46 18
1982–83 First Division 26 8 2 1 4 3 4 3 1 0 37 15
1983–84 First Division 10 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 12 2
1984–85 First Division 22 10 3 1 2 4 6 3 0 0 33 18
Total 125 48 21 9 20 9 16 9 1 0 183 75
Manchester United (loan) 1983–84 First Division 7 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2
Total 7 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2
West Bromwich Albion 1985–86 First Division 19 5 0 0 6 2 0 0 3 3 28 10
1986–87 Second Division 21 11 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 23 11
Total 40 16 1 0 6 2 0 0 4 3 51 21
Charlton Athletic 1986–87 First Division 7 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 12 2
1987–88 First Division 28 10 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 32 12
1988–89 First Division 14 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 3
1989–90 First Division 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
1990–91 Second Division 7 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 9 1
Total 56 15 4 1 4 2 0 0 7 0 71 18
Career Total 375 129 31 11 42 16 16 9 12 3 476 168
A. ^ The "Other" column constitutes appearances and goals in the FA Charity Shield, Football League play-offs and Full Members Cup.

Honours[edit]

Tottenham Hotspur

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Matthews, Tony (1994). The Encyclopaedia of Stoke City. Lion Press. ISBN 0-9524151-0-0. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Stoke City 101 Golden Greats. Desert Islands Books. 2002. ISBN 1-874287554. 
  3. ^ Football: Halcyon days for a political footballer, Alan Hubbard, The Independent, 11 April 1999
  4. ^ See how your Everton FC knowledge compares to our FA Cup final fact file, Liverpool Echo, 28 May 2009.
  5. ^ a b c d "Garth Crooks". BBC. 10 August 2001. Retrieved 11 December 2007. 
  6. ^ Team of the week Retrieved 3 September 2008

External links[edit]