Gary Auerbach

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Gary Auerbach
Gauerbachdc.jpg
Gary Auerbach
Born (1948-04-24)April 24, 1948
Monticello, New York
Nationality American
Education Chiropractic
Alma mater Palmer College of Chiropractic
Occupation Chiropractor, Farmer, Politician, Photographer
Years active 1978 - present
Known for Founding the World Federation of Chiropractic, Politician
Home town Tucson, Arizona
Title Chiropractor, (DC)
Spouse(s) Christine Tamulaitis Auerbach

Gary Alan Auerbach (born 1948) is an American chiropractor and photographer.

He was born April 24, 1948 in Monticello, New York, to Norman and Judith Auerbach. He received his BS in accounting in 1971 from the University of Arizona in Tucson, and worked for Coopers & Lybrand in San Francisco. He received his Doctor of Chiropractic Degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1975. Auerbach is notable for having been the founding President of the World Federation of Chiropractic; and for being the Democratic candidate for Arizona's 5th congressional district in 1994.[1] He was Vice-President of "Triple A Pistachios", owned and operated by his family in Cochise, Arizona.[2] Subsequently he became one of the leading artists of Platinum Photography, with his works appearing in the Smithsonian Institution,[3] Library of Congress,[4] and the private collections of Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Walter Cronkite, among others.[2] He is married to Christine Tamulaitis Auerbach, and they have three children.

Biography[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

We Walk in Beauty - G. Auerbach, 2008 - ISBN 0-9773062-0-8[3][5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Political Graveyard". Retrieved 12, 2009.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  2. ^ a b c d Lockwood, Ryan (May 20, 2002). "Never a Still Life". Dynamic Chiropractic 20 (11). 
  3. ^ a b "Gary Auerbach Native American Portraits". Retrieved 2009-12-20. 
  4. ^ "Gary Auerbach". Retrieved 2009-12-20. 
  5. ^ Auerbach, Gary (2008). We Walk in Beauty. Self. p. 88. ISBN 0-9773062-0-8. 
  6. ^ "Letter from Smithsonian Institution". April 5, 2004. Retrieved 2009-12-20. 

External links[edit]